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24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago  c

 

While many things improve with age and advanced technology, there are some things that stand the test of time. What worked perfectly a century ago is still just as effective and useful today as it was then. Here are some great gardening tips from the early 1900’s.

100 years ago Gallaher Ltd printed a short “How-To” series, with clever hints for emergency situations. The cards were distributed with packs of cigarettes. All the pictures bellow are part of the George Arents Collection, The New York Public Library. Please enjoy the article.

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 14Vegetables

#1. How To Make Potatoes Yield Good Crops

Placing potato tubers in shallow boxes in a light location, safe from freezing temperatures in the early spring gets your crop off to a good start. Leave them there until March or April when it’s time to plant. Small shoots or sprouts should have emerged from the eyes. Leave only a few of the large ones on each tuber by rubbing off the smallest shoots. This will ensure that your crop will contain a minimum of the smaller tubers. Planting potatoes that are already sprouted versus those in a dormant state yields heavier crops.


#2. How To Make a Potato Clamp

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 15Potatoes, onions, apples, beets, pears and flower bulbs or roots such as dahlias and gladioli can be safely stored out in the open. A layer of straw is first put on the ground which the tubers and others are then placed upon. The second layer of about 6 inches of straw is then put over them. Around this heap, a trench should be dug with the soil being thrown up over the straw until it is also about 6 inches deep. At the top, a ventilation hole of about 6 inches in diameter should be left open and then stopped up with straw.


#3. How To Plant Potatoes

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 16Heavy soil preparation for potatoes starts in the fall with ridging up the ground. Raking it over in the spring and then digging it over just before planting are the next steps. The sprouted and dis-budded tubers are planted in March in rather shallow trenches that are about 2 feet apart and 7 inches deep. Be sure to amend the soil with manure before planting. Tubers are to be placed 12-15 inches apart with the soil lightly raked over them. Earth them up with a hoe once the stems are about 4 inches above the ground.


#4. How To Store Onions

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 17Onions should be pulled up when their leaves have browned. In order to ripen them, lay them on their sides in the sun. If it is wet, place them on sacks in a covered location until they can be put back in the sunshine, turning them several times to ripen evenly. A popular storage method is to plait the onions into a type of rope which can then be hung up on a hook or nail in a sheltered place. This “rope” is made by folding the onion leaves around a straw skein or core and then binding the leaves with heavy string.


#5. How To Divide and Replant Rhubarb

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 18Rhubarb is a plant that can be left alone in one spot for several years. Once it stops growing vigorously it is time to divide and replant. It does best in shady locations as full sun can dry the soil out too quickly. February and March are the best months to divide rhubarb. Use a spade to gently lift and divide large clumps ensuring that each clump has buds attached to the roots. Replant these pieces about 3 feet apart in ground that is deeply dug with manured soil. Cover the tops with approximately 3 inches of soil.


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 #6. How To Plant Cabbages

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 19To get a late fall and winter supply of cabbage, they must be planted in March. Sowing more at intervals until the beginning of August will provide spring and summer produce. 1 ounce of seed will cover approximately 5 square yards. The seedlings will need to be thinned in order for the strongest plants to survive and thrive. A spacing of 24 inches is enough for most varieties. Watering should be done before planting versus after.


#7. Cabbage Plants

I24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 20n February early cabbage varieties can be sown in a warm frame in pans or boxes. Hardening them off should happen before they become crowded and before planting. The seedlings will turn quickly and be ready for harvest in the summer. Don’t plant any that don’t have a heart or are blind.


#8. How to Grow Peas

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 21Peas need to be sown properly to ensure a good crop and to avoid wasting seed. To harvest peas in July and August, plant seeds in intervals of 7-10 days during March and April. Make a drill of about 12 inches wide and 1 ½ inches deep in well manured and deeply dug ground. Each of the drills will accommodate three rows of peas spaced about 3 inches apart and lightly covered with soil. Gorse clippings placed in the drill can help deter mice and rodents.


#9. Raising Early Peas

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 22Drench cut turves with a light brine solution and then lay them out (grass-side up) for the birds to clear the bugs and worms. Once this is done, sow the seed in thick lines on each turf, covering them with fine soil. Keep the frame closed until plants begin to appear. To plant seedlings in March or April, lift the turves from the frame and place the strips in the prepared ground. Shore them up with soil and stake them in your preferred manner.


#10. How To Plant Asparagus

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 23A bed for two rows of asparagus plants needs to be about 3 to 4 feet wide with a trench of about 2 feet wide and 1 foot deep between the beds. Plant the asparagus about 4 inches from the top with the roots spread to each side of the ridges. Do this quickly as their roots are very sensitive to the air. The rows should be 18-24 inches apart with at least 9 inches from the edges of the bed. 18 inches should be left between the plants as they do not like to be crowded or placed in soggy soil conditions.


#11. How To Grow Runner Beans

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 24There are two common methods to stake and train your runner beans. The first way is to place pairs of 8-10 foot stakes at intervals of 1 foot. Each pair should be crossed approximately 6 feet from the ground and then attached to a horizontal cross bar or stake. Use twine to secure them.

The second method is to build a support in the shape of a “T” and place it at the ends of each row. Connect the “T”s using three pieces of wire attached at the the bottom of the “T” and one at the end of each arm or crosspiece. Tie pieces of twine from the top wires to the bottom at intervals of about 1 foot.

Fruit Trees

#12. How To Plant Trees

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 1To plant a tree, dig a hole about a foot deep that is about a foot wider than the roots themselves. Allow for adequate drainage by forking up the bottom, adding 6 or 7 inches of good soil as you go. Before adding the tree, make sure the roots have been soaked and that any stragglers or damaged rootlets have been removed.

Place the tree in the hole with the roots spread out, don’t let them become bunched or knotted up and then cover them with soil. To settle the tree, shake it occasionally as you are backfilling the hole and tread the ground lightly to pack the soil. Don’t forget to drive a stout stake into the ground to help support the stem, but don’t attach it until about a month has passed.


#13. How to Espalier Apple Trees

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 2Apple trees in bloom, especially when trained to act as an espalier or hedge between gardens are a lovely addition. Plant two-year-old espaliers with four to five branches already in place in a sheltered location with good soil. During the first two years of growth allow the tree to blossom, but don’t let it set fruit.


#14. How To Prune Young Apple Trees

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 3Proper pruning of young fruit trees is important to encourage strong branches that can stand a heavy load. This may mean no harvest for the first two years but will ensure years full of fruit after that.

Plant the apple tree in the fall. That winter cut the branches back to about 18 inches to encourage bud growth in the spring. Make the cuts just above a bud that is pointed in the direction you will want the new branch to grow.


#15. How To Preserve the Flavor of Apples

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 4Store dessert apples in a cool, moist location such as a cellar or a small shed with a dirt floor and thatched roof to preserve these late fruits. By wrapping each apple in oiled paper and placing them in either a wooden box or storage tray, you can save them for months.

If you don’t have a storage room or building, you can bury the apples in the ground and cover them with about 6 inches of dirt or make apple sugar. Don’t try this with any varieties but the apples that ripen in the winter and later.


#16. How To Grease Band Fruit Trees

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 5Every September it is common to see bands of grease-proof paper ringing the trunks of fruit trees. This is an important maintenance task to ensure wingless moths won’t be able to lay their eggs in the fall. The caterpillars that hatch from these eggs can destroy entire crops. The bands are coated with a special grease to trap the moths and tied at the top and bottom to make sure the insects can’t go beneath the paper.


#17. How To Prune Root Cordon Fruit Trees

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 6Cordon fruit trees with their one to three stems are welcome in small and large gardens alike. They can be trained to grow on a trellis or against a fence or wall. Summer and fall pruning of branches must be done to keep the tree’s shape. Root pruning is advised as well or the tree will begin to bear less fruit even while growing well. This is best done in late October or November by exposing the thick roots and trimming them back to within about 15 inches of the base. Cover again with fresh soil to protect them.


Berry Bushes, Canes, and Vines

#18. How To Thin Raspberry Canes

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 7To encourage growth for the next summer, newly planted canes should be shortened and thinned out to a maximum of two suckers. It is always the wisest course to not allow too many suckers to grow as they will weaken the plant and cause a light crop. Keep only the strongest canes and thin the rest in following years.


24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 8#19. How To “Top” Raspberry Canes

Proper pruning of raspberry canes is the key to a heavy crop. Summer-fruiting raspberries are pruned twice a year. After harvest, the canes are cut to the ground with four or five of the new shoots being tied to the support as their replacements. In February the “topping” is done which consists of pruning the tops of any canes that reach above the wire supports. The fall-fruiting varieties are to be cut down in March.


#20. How To Prune Gooseberry Bushes

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 9October to the end of January is the best time to prune gooseberries. All wild growth and straggling tips must be removed while leaving the center of the bush open. During the winter the ground needs to be worked up, manure added if needed, and all weeds removed in order for the water and nutrients to sink in.


24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 10#21. How To Prune Black Currant Bushes

December is when any weak growth or dead wood should be cut away from black currant bushes. You can propagate black currants in two different manners. Take 8-inch cuttings with the buds removed from the lower half and plant them at about 4 inches deep in November.

The second method is removing and then replanting any suckers from October until pruning time in December. Out in the open black currant bushes need about 5 feet of space between them. 3 feet or so is sufficient if they have a wall or support behind them.


#22. How To Prune Young Red Currant Bushes

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 11Hard pruning of newly planted red currant bushes is required in winter to ensure well-branched bushes full of fruit buds in the spring. If the pruning is done lightly, the bush will only grow on top and leave the lower half bare. Autumn planted bushes should be taken down by one-half or two-thirds if the plant isn’t hardy in that first winter. If they are being planted in the winter or early spring, prune them before planting. Cut the small, weaker shoots and only leave the strongest branches.


Strawberries

#23. How To Protect a Strawberry Bed

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 12light wooden frame covered with netting is a great way to protect your fruit. Strawberries enjoy a light compost mixture consisting of two parts of rich, sandy loam with one part leaf mold and sand. Mulching with manure in March and surrounding the plants with straw in May will make for cleaner fruit at harvest. Water regularly in June and add a liquid manure fertilizer once the fruit color begins to change.


#24. How To Propagate Strawberries

24 Lost Gardening Tips from 100 Years Ago 13Strawberries are easy to multiply by simply pinning down runners from the main plant in June or July. Within a month or two, the new plants have rooted and are ready to be removed and planted elsewhere. For forcing, allow new runners to take root in pots that have been sunk in the soil near the main plant. When well-rooted, they can be potted up and put on an outdoors cinder bed until October. They can then be moved to the frame until January when the greenhouse treatment can finish them off.


 

 

Feng Shui says, this plant attracts money like magnet !! crassula1
Feng Shui says, this plant attracts money like magnet !! nurserylive products

Most of us have heard about the money plant, but there also exist a plant that is said to attract money like a magnet.

crasula  Feng Shui says, this plant attracts money like magnet !! crasula

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Though you need to work hard to earn money, still you may find a tight financial situation in life. There are many Vastu Shastra solutions for this problem, you may have received advice to keep money plant at home. It’s very common to find the plant in every home, but have you heard about “Crassula” plant.

Crassula-Ovata-  Feng Shui says, this plant attracts money like magnet !! Crassula Ovata

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It is also called the Money Tree. Let me tell you about it openly. As per Feng Shui, by just keeping the plant in the house, it starts attracting money in the house. It has mixed color leaves but not weak as other leaves, strong enough, not to get broken. 

crassula  Feng Shui says, this plant attracts money like magnet !! crassula

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Like Money plant, Crassula is also low maintenance plant. Can be watered in 2 to 3 alternate days. It is a shade loving the indoor plant and easily adjustable and kept in almost any part of the house.

crassula1  Feng Shui says, this plant attracts money like magnet !! crassula1

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Speaking about its properties, this plant attracts money towards our house with its positive energy. The plant should be kept at the entrance of the house. In a few days, the plant will start to show its impact. Peace in the home of every kind will remain intact.

Disclaimer: This is a user generated content, and could be unusually better or worse in quality. You too can write your own suggestions, tips, experiences on plant & gardening.
Content on this blog are the sole responsibility of their writers and the writer will take full responsibility & liability for issues / disputes that results from something written in or as a direct result of something written in a comment. The accuracy, completeness, veracity, honesty, exactitude, factuality and politeness of comments are not guaranteed.

 

 

Natural herbs have actually long been revered for both their medicinal as well as culinary value. They could heal colds, assist you rest as well as include flavor and zest to supper. Thankfully for house garden enthusiasts, growing natural herbs is fairly easy. They thrive in practically any kind of soil, do not need much plant food, as well as are not often bothered by insect or pest.

Specified as a plant without a woody stem that dies back at the end of each expanding season, herbs were once taken into consideration a gift of the gods. Today, herbs are popular in many home gardens, where their leaves are used for flavoring as well as an entire plant might be used for medicinal purposes.

 

7 clever herb gardening tips you absolutely love to try.

Tips for Growing Your Own Herbs

tips-for-growing-your-own-herbs  7 Clever Herb Gardening Tips You Absolutely Love To Try - I Love Herbalism Tips for growing your own herbs

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Nothing tastes better than fresh herbs. There’s nothing better than cooking something and walking outside and picking some of your own fresh herbs to add to your dish. Once you start cooking with them, it’s difficult to imagine cooking without them. A side benefit of growing your own herbs is that you can dry them and store them for use later in the year when you may not be able to grow them because of the weather. You save so much money when you have your own herbs. Here’s a few tips for growing your own herbs at home. You can grow these directly in the ground, if you have the room, or in pots. They are easy to grow, you’ll save money, and your food will taste fantastic. >> Here are Tips for Growing Your Own Herbs


A better way to grow cilantro

A better way to grow cilantro  7 Clever Herb Gardening Tips You Absolutely Love To Try - I Love Herbalism A better way to grow cilantro

source.

Wouldn’t it be nice to have fresh cilantro growing right outside your kitchen door? Whenever you wanted to fix Mexican salsa or guacamole, or a Middle Eastern yogurt sauce for your lamb kabobs, there the lacy, sweetly pungent leaves would be, ready to harvest.

But if you’ve ever tried to grow it, you’ve probably noticed that cilantro yields a fast crop; plants are barely up before they try to flower and set seeds. So those tasty leaves aren’t around long, especially in warm weather. >> Here is a better way to grow cilantro

Mason Jar DIY Herb Garden

Mason Jar DIY Herb Garden  7 Clever Herb Gardening Tips You Absolutely Love To Try - I Love Herbalism Mason Jar DIY Herb Garden

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Growing herbs is one homesteader skill that everyone should know (in my opinion, that is). It may be a challenge though in case you don’t have any space outside or when winter is coming. This may pose a problem but don’t you worry, the solution is just inside your home, an indoor herb garden! If you haven’t considered it, well, these indoor herb garden ideas will show you how. >> Mason Jar DIY Herb Garden

 

15 DIY Indoor Herb Ideas

15 DIY Indoor Herb Ideas   7 Clever Herb Gardening Tips You Absolutely Love To Try - I Love Herbalism 15 DIY Indoor Herb Ideas

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In an attempt to be more healthy most of us are going organic nowadays and the best way is to grow our own vegetables. Growing your herbs indoor does not have to dull and unattractive. Here are some DIY indoor herb space ideas. Enjoy >> 15 DIY Indoor Herb Ideas

ALL ABOUT BASIL: HOW TO GROW, PROPAGATE, CHOP & FREEZE

all-about-basil-how-to-grow-propagate-chop-and-freeze  7 Clever Herb Gardening Tips You Absolutely Love To Try - I Love Herbalism ALL ABOUT BASIL HOW TO GROW PROPAGATE CHOP and FREEZE

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Today it’s all about basil: how to grow, propagate, chop & freeze this versatile herb. Basil is one of those plants that grows almost anywhere and needs minimal care. It was the very first herb I ever planted and has been part of my herb garden ever since. >> First up is how to propagate basil from cuttings.

 

15 Creative Ways to Make an Herb Garden

15 Creative Ways to Make an Herb Garden  7 Clever Herb Gardening Tips You Absolutely Love To Try - I Love Herbalism 15 Creative Ways to Make an Herb Gardensource.

If you are toying with the idea of planting an herb garden, it’s time to take the plunge. There are incredible benefits to growing herbs from home; the herbs are always available, they are good for you, and planting a herb garden can be practice for planting a bigger garden. Plus, gardening is scientifically proven to be a stress relieving hobby and you can grow the most exotic forms of basil (there are actually 30 in all, time to choose your favorite!) >> 15 Creative Ways to Make an Herb Garden

 

How to Grow Lavender and Propagate it!

How to Grow Lavender and Propagate it  7 Clever Herb Gardening Tips You Absolutely Love To Try - I Love Herbalism How to Grow Lavender and Propagate it

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Lavender plants are one of the world’s most popular garden plants, and why wouldn’t they be? Evergreen, tough as old boots, soft, silvery foliage and gorgeous scented flowers – it truly is a plant for everyone. Of course, buying lavender can prove expensive, but luckily they are very easy to take from cuttings.

Lavender makes great hedges and borders. Here are a few tips and tricks for growing successful lavender plants, and how to propagate them. >> How to Grow Lavender and Propagate it!

 

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Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden

Not just for construction purpose, PVC pipes can be used for a variety of purposes. As it is sturdy, waterproof, inexpensive and easy to get, it is the perfect material for many DIY homestead projects. Even if you’re not good at DIY, you can also drill, cut, paint and glue those PVC pipes easily. Spring is on its road, so this is proper time to look for some creative ways to take care of your garden or yard. If you love gardening, creating several useful PVC pipe projects to make your gardening experience a bit more easier and interesting is a good idea. Whether your passion is for landscaping or farming, I am pretty sure that you will be surprised by here’s PVC pipe garden projects. Take a look at the following ideas and get inspired!

1. pvc pipe for coiled hose storage.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 1

Source Unknown.

2. Build a hand-held seeder to let you stand up to plant beans and corn.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 2

Get Tutorial here ====> sensiblesurvival.blogspot.com

 

3. PVC watering grid will help you become more efficient in watering the garden.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 3

Above Tutorial here ====> squarefoot.creatingforum.com    Bottom Tutorial here ====> bsntech.com

4. It is a clever way to store your garden tools.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 4

Source: newlywoodwards.com

5. Set up a strawberry tower in your backyard.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 5

Source: flickr.com

6. Build a multipurpose raised bed protective cover.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 6

Get Tutorial here ====> charsgardening.com

7. Planters made from plastic PVC tubes and mosaic tiles.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 7

Get Tutorial here ====> szinesotletek.blog.hu

8. Tormato Trellis makes your tomato growing experience a bit more easier and interesting.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 8

Get Tutorial here ====> itsatormato.com

9. Build a cheap chicken feeder from PVC pipes.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 9

Source Unknown.

10. This towel rack is great for outdoor shower.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 10

Source Unknown.

11. Deep pot irrigation uses an open-ended PVC pipe placed next to a planted seedling.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 11

Source: nativerevegetation.org

12. Use PVC pipe to build a maintenance free Birdhouse.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 12

Get Tutorial here ====> diyeasycrafts.com

13. DIY backyard sunshade will block the sun for your kids when they play outdoors.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 13

Get Tutorial here ====> thekreativelife.com

14. Don’t want to have to go up on a ladder to clean your rain gutter drain?


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 14

Get Tutorial here ====> instructables.com

15. Go for PVC fencing.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 15

Source: pvcworkshop.com

16. DIY vertical PVC planter.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 16

The Top Image Source: attainable-sustainable.net

17. Use PVC pipes to create a living canopy.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 17

Source Unknown.

18. Garden and yard tool rack made with pipes.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 18

Source: circoinnovations.com

19. Construct a trellis and then hang potted plants on it.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 19

Source: pvcworkshop.com

20. Spray paint a pvc pipe silver and then cover it in the dot stickers to make this cute outdoor solar lamp.


Top 20 Low-Cost DIY Gardening Projects Made With PVC Pipes DIY PVC Pipe Projects for Garden 20

Get Tutorial here ====> notjustahousewife.net

 

Working in the garden can be time-consuming, especially if you’re having a hard time getting your plants and veggies to cooperate. But sometimes the best ideas come in the form of strange hacks, like the ones we’ve compiled in this list.

If you’re looking for a few ways to spruce up your gardening tricks, try one of these unusual tactics:

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1. Slow the spread of blight with pennies
Blight can ruin an entire crop in your garden. If you want to save your plants without turning to chemicals, Vegitate Gardening recommends slicing partway through an infected branch and inserting a pre-1983 penny into the slit. The copper should help slow the spread enough to harvest your crop.

10 weird gardening hacks that keep pests away and improve growth 72877ee99d9019ca6ac59bb3f83612de
2. Keep melons safe with nylons
One of the best ways to grow melons is on a trellis because the height keeps pests and diseases away from the fruit. However, the weight can pull the melons off before they’re ripe. Keep melons on the branch longer by cutting a leg off an old pair of pantyhose and using it to create a sling for the melons, Rodale’s Organic Life recommends.
10 weird gardening hacks that keep pests away and improve growth 63bed17d12c97b447c70244ae1bc2fa3

3. Keep pests at bay with milk jugs
Protect the environment and keep your plants safe from bugs and animals with used milk gallons. After washing the jug, cut off the bottom and place the top over new plants, covering the base with dirt.

10 weird gardening hacks that keep pests away and improve growth a74ef677db22fec0a024ecffb407f40a

4. Start seeds in a lemon peel
Keep your early seedlings safe, give them extra nutrients, and add more nutrients to the ground with a citrus fruit rind. Add a little dirt, and plant the seedling. Once it’s taken root, plant the entire thing in the ground. The fruit peel will eventually break down, adding more nutrients to your garden.

10 weird gardening hacks that keep pests away and improve growth 993ad2089d588ab60b4071d17d8697c6
5. Keep dirt out of your nails
Before you head out to dig in the soil, run your nails over a bar of soap. The soap will add a buffer to block the dirt. Just rinse it all away when you’re done in the garden, It’s Overflowing recommends.

6. Keep slugs away with pennies
The penny is the star of the show in this article! Did you know slugs aren’t very fond of copper? Attach (pre-1983) pennies to a clean baseball or bowling ball with water-resistant glue and place it in your garden. It looks pretty and keeps your veggies safe!

10 weird gardening hacks that keep pests away and improve growth 16966c483ba5a3d5beb73c7b5f14c6ae

7. Plant forks and keep deer and raccoons away
Nobody wants to step on a fork that’s been wedged into the ground. Ouch! Wedge the forks into the ground near young plants to keep noshers away. Just remember to watch where you step when you go out to feed your veggies!

10 weird gardening hacks that keep pests away and improve growth e30535f464d1eaeef266be88ce755dfd

8. Keep fungus away with cinnamon
One risk of transplanting flowers, fruits and plants is that there is a higher risk of fungus growth on the replanted roots. Protect the roots by dipping them in cinnamon before replanting.

9. Fertilize with coffee grounds
You can recycle used coffee grounds by adding them to your compost. The coffee helps with the alkaline levels of the soil and adds nutrients (like nitrogen) to the ground. Just don’t use fresh, unbrewed grounds because they contain too much caffeine, according to Angela Harris.
10 weird gardening hacks that keep pests away and improve growth 2aea709869eb2a09fbabb5a8cc2c0861
10. Grow roses in potatoes
Take rose cuttings and insert them into a potato. Then bury the potato in the ground and watch your roses bloom. The potatoes help keep the plant moist while it grows. Check out the full tutorial from Amateur Gardening.
10 weird gardening hacks that keep pests away and improve growth fba59dc52d7b7104f5de77b6ffee09b5

Feeling a little creative in the garden? Try one of these tricks, and don’t forget to share them with your friends on Facebook.

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