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Before the high tunnel, farmers in New YorkState would grow from May to November.

And basically they soldeverything, and farmers were broke.

They had no money in the winter.

Well whatthat high tunnel did is that now we were able to grow things.

You don't grow thingsin the high tunnel, you expand the season.

That's what it does.

So for example, whenthe frost comes without the high tunnel, my peppers would die, my beans will die,and that's it.

Now with the high tunnel, the frost would come inSeptember, October and inside my high tunnel I have beautiful peppers growing, andtomatoes growing, and everything looks beautiful.

The typical size would beabout 90 feet by 72 feet.

You can get fresh produce in New York produced byNew York farmers, that's been what the high tunnel is all about.

So we were selling inMarch, which before you would not able to do.

But the building's constantly in use, and that means money in the hands of farmers.

I dare say that you probablycan recoup your costs within two years.

If you go to the farmers market nowfarmers are very happy and they will tell you that for the first time, theyreally don't have to borrow that much money to start farming.

Every year now itmakes a big difference.

Source: Youtube

Posted by in growing herbs Tags: , , , on Sep 15, 2019

(inspiring music) – Hello again, and welcometo Lifestyle Gardening.

I'm Kim Todd, and we're soglad you could join us again for another fun programand good gardening.

Today we're gonna takea look at raised beds, growing herbs, and we'll checkout how hops are harvested.

Starting off today's program, we'll be focusing on plantingmedia for containers.

What's great about that is you can either buy aready-made potting mix or you can make your own by following a fewsimple guidelines.

(energetic music) You know it used to be if you were going into a gardencenter to buy a potting mix for whatever you wantedto grow in the garden, in a container, in a greenhouse, on your windowsill, it was pretty easy.

You went in andyou bought a bag, and that was aboutthe end of it.

Well, as with so manyother things in the world, it's become a bitmore complicated, and that's probablya good thing.

We grow so many differentkinds of plant in containers that really havevery specific needs, and that also includes whatthey need for their root system.

In general, potting mixesreally should be well-drained.

The only exceptionto that might be, of course, the water plants.

You might have a bog garden,or something like that.

They need a differentkind of a media, but if it's cacti, if it isstarting seeds from scratch, if it is bromeliadsor house plants, you really do needto take a look at what is in that potting mix.

The interesting thingabout what has happened is you can now buy very specific one-ingredient bags ofwhatever, and mix your own.

Charcoal, as an example.

We think of that asactivated charcoal as being something you usein aquariums, in pools.

Same sort of thing.

In a terrarium, it canform a drainage layer.

It can take awaythose odors of sort of nasty, watery kinds of things.

Perlite has longbeen an ingredient in a lot of standard pottingmixes, so is vermiculite.

You can buy a bag thatis 100% peat moss, which has beeninoculated, if you will, with mycorrhizaeand worm castings, so rather than justbeing the peat moss, it has a little bit morenutritional value to it.

And of course, if youhave tried to do anything with worm castings,or purchase that, that's a pretty great additive.

You can do a mix-you-own.

If you are a cactus grower,you probably already know that cacti really want to growin the rocks, in the sand.

You can buy those thingsagain, all by themselves and mix your own mediafor your containers.

Now, if you really don'twant to go down that road, if it's a wholelot easier for you to buy a one-size-fits-all, you still have optionsin the gardening world, and that would increase a lotof mixes that are currently that combination ofthe right ingredients.

They may have fertilizers added.

They may have aslow-release fertilizer.

That means that youdon't have to add any additional fertilizationduring four to six months, and that kind of takesa little bit of that, "Did I remember tofertilize my plants?" out of the equation.

You can also buy mixes thatdo contain worm castings.

Bat guano is oneof the ingredients we see on some of those bags.

In any case, what you want todo is you want to make sure that you are lookingvery specificallyat the bags of media that contain what youare going to need to use to grow the plantsthat you want to grow in your containersin the location where they're going to be successful.

(energetic music) Your growing media isextremely important, which is true for both yourgarden soil and your containers.

As we've just seen, you caneither grab a complete mix or customize it to matchyour plant's needs.

Up next on today's programis our go-gardening feature.

This week, we're goingto tell you a great way to get started in gardening without having to tearup your back yard.

A simple raised bed is goodfor spring and fall gardens as well as throughoutthe growing season.

(piano music) You might want to go garden without having to turnup your whole back yard.

In that case, considerdoing raised beds.

They're prettyeasy to construct.

You have some 2-bys,you have some 4×4 posts and a few screws tohold them together.

You might be putting up hoops.

You might be puttingup a trellis.

What you will want to consider is if you're going intothe fall gardening season, let's choose some thingsthat are cool-season crops.

You will want to putin really good soil and make sure it's well drained, so again, that soilmedium is really essential if you're going to startgoing and garden correctly.

Then you're gonna choosethings like beets, carrots, radishes,collards, peas, that will actually withstandthose cooler night temperatures and give you thecrop that you want.

You will want to plant those by looking at the dateon the seed package and you're really lookingat days to maturity.

If you back yourselves upinto the first part of August and it's just deadly hot, and you have somethingthat is going to take a long season to mature, that may not bethe right choice.

Short-season things,such as radishes, you can start and thenhope it is not too hot but if it does get too hot,you simply harvest early and you may actuallyhave the chance to do another crop.

You will watch as alwaysfor pests and diseases, but you'll notice also thatyou can pack your vegetables in pretty tightly in a raised bed.

It's pretty intense gardening, and then go ahead and harvestas things become mature.

We have a great cropin here of kohlrabi that is almost ready.

Our radishes actually did bolt, and we also have someroly poly damage on them which is interesting.

This is collard greens,which is one of those greens that is actually makingsort of a resurgence or becoming popular inthe Great Plains states even though it has beenpopular in the South for a long time.

What you also mightwant to consider is if you want to extendthat season even further, even if you are abeginning gardener, you can use the hoops.

You'll leave the coveringoff of those hoops so that the plantcan get all the sun, all the moisture, allthe warmth they need.

Perhaps then, go aheadand pull that very first fall crop out, and putin a crop in the spring.

The nice things about the hoopsalso, and the raised beds, is that you'll find thatthe soil will actually warm up sooner in the spring so if you get thecrop from the fall out you can start evenearlier in the spring with your planting than you can if you're going into the soil that you have amendedin the ground.

It is a great alternative tobe able to begin gardening in a very small,restricted space.

See how well it worksout for you to do that before you go through theeffort, and maybe the expense, of plowing up a wholeportion of your yard.

And of course, aswith any gardening where you're growingvegetables for consumption, and flowers that need somesun, choose your site wisely.

If it's in too much shade,if it's poorly drained, if you actually don't haveaccess to a water source to be able to water it, you're going to havea bit of trouble.

Those all are going to apply whether you'regardening in the ground or you're gardeningin a raised bed.

Raised beds are agreat idea to try if you're just startingout in the gardening world or you're old to it.

Their versatility canhelp you get started earlier in the spring, and keep gardeningwell into the fall with the addition of some hoopsand some plastic covering.

A well-constructed raised bed will give you yearsof satisfaction, fun, and way toomany vegetables.

In this week's landscape lesson, we're going to talk about herbs.

Herbs are always a niceaddition to a home garden, but you can also prettyeasily grow them indoors during the winter months, and fresh herbs will alwaysmake that home cooking sizzle.

(energetic music) You know, in the winter months, there's hardly anythingthat sounds better to eat than a little piece ofyour own fresh herbs in that spaghettisauce or that soup.

So, you too can grow yourown herbs on a windowsill if you do a couple of things.

First off, make sureyou choose really good, healthy, well-grown plants, and that's pretty easy to see.

You look for good foliage,you look for not diseases, no diseases, no insect pests, nice green coloror silver color.

If it's a sage, you don'twant green sage necessarily, and you look for adecent root system.

You know, the biggerthe better typically because it's goingto adapt more easily to the conditionsin your own home which are unlikely tobe like a green house.

You want to make surewhen you buy those herbs you have them well-wrapped if you're going totake them out of their lovely, nice, moist,warm, sunny environment and transport them to the car, and for heaven's sakes,don't leave them sitting while you go grocery shopping.

You want to make sure alsothat they have enough light.

One of the things that wedo find with growing herbs in the house on a windowsill is either not enough light,or too dry, or too wet.

The too wet, of course,goes to what is the soil or the media inwhich they're growing and how often have youbeen watering them.

Most herbs, as peoplewho use them know, need to be pinched,pruned, and eaten.

That's the whole point, so you want to makesure that you do that with your herbs as well so that they will continueto push new foliage.

If you purchase them properly,you manage them correctly, you eat them right, whichis pretty easy to do, you are likely to beable to keep them through the rest of thelong winter months.

You may even be able to usethem outside in herb gardens or in containers on your patio so that you havemulti-season use of something thatis actually even still a really good house plant.

You have lots of choices.

Basil, parsley, sages,things like cilantro, so you can reallypick and choose based both on thequality of the plant.

You like its textureand its form.

Maybe you like the way it looks.

You don't really care ifyou're going to eat it, but you can alsothen pick and choose based on the onesthat you cook with.

Go ahead, take a peek, enjoy, take a piece, take a bite,and grow the herbs inside on your own windowsill.

That's the fun part about herbs.

Not only can you cookwith fresh herbs, but some can alsobe really ornamental and brighten upany home kitchen.

We've got a real treat foryou for this week's interview.

I had the pleasureto talk to Amy Seiler from the Nebraska Forest Service about some fantastic plants that grow in the westernpart of our state.

We'll see some evergreensand some other native plants that give wonderfulwinter interest and would be great selectionsfor gardeners out west.

(inspiring music) I am really excitedto be able to be talking to Amy Seiler today.

She drove all the way infrom Scottsbluff, Nebraska.

She is communityforestry specialist from that end of the state, and she is goingto be talking about some of the differencesbetween here and there in the great state of Nebraska.

Get started a little bit with the things that willgive us winter interest in the pan handleand points west, because of course, they'regonna be a little bit different than what people tryto use in central east and eastern Nebraska.

– Certainly, and asyou and I both know, winter interest is so important because our wintersare so long here.

A lot of the plantsthat we like to utilize have lots of differenttextural elements, different colors,different tones, and so probably oneof the first ones that I want to highlight is something that youwouldn't normally think that you could grow outin western Nebraska, and this is called curlleaf mountain mahogany.

What it is is abroad-leaf evergreen that will grow out west.

It's a plant that's actuallynative to southwest Colorado and down intoArizona, New Mexico.

It's a plant thathas really thin very deep green leaf.

It's not only abroad-leaf evergreen, but the unique thing is that its drought-tolerant also.

It handles reallylow relative humidity and does very, verywell with limited water.

That would be oneof the first ones.

This is a plant that youcan use as a large shrub or a small tree, and itgets about 20 feet tall and it's very uniquein the landscape.

– So Amy, that would perhapsbe a western substitute on steroids for the boxwoodthat we use here, correct? – Most certainly yes,and to be quite honest, I've never really seen thisplant have any winter burn on it whereas the boxwood that weattempt to grow out west, if we do get it to go, itwill have severe die-back and winter burn, so thisis a great alternative.

It will get a littlebit bigger for sure, and the appearance mayseem a little bit more wild and gnarly, but I thinkthat just kind of goes with the landscape out there.

– All right, the wild west.

– The wild west, yes.

Another great plant thatI brought to highlight, this is regular rabbit brush.

There's two kinds, there'sa dwarf rabbit brush, which gets about 18to 24 inches tall and what I haveright here today, this is typical rabbit brush, and that gets aboutthree to five feet tall.

It can get taller ifit has more water, but it generally is aroundthe five foot range.

The reason that thisplant is so ideal, it doesn't hold itsfoliage in the winter, but it does have theselovely lime green stems, and this very, verybeautiful seed head.

We like to utilize this plantjust to give us some texture and the thing I love about alot of these western plants, Kim, is that when they'rebacklit by the sunlight, they just stand outand look amazing.

– You know Amy,we have tried this on campus in a couple of spots just because it is soincredibly beautiful.

It's in the aster family, so you get thosegold flowers as well.

We don't have much luck.

You mention backlit,and I think off there you talked about anotherplant that you love which certainly wecan't grow, winterfat? – Winterfat, yes, andthat is another one that its seed head isabsolutely beautiful as the sun hits it, Particularly in the winterit looks really good, but the other positivething about that is it has silveryfoliage that, so, we would consider that abroad-leaf, not evergreen, but as you wouldmaybe say, ever-gray.

It has that reallyattractive silver foliage and that really can addsomething attractive to a stark landscapein the winter.

– All right, talk forjust a second about pines because I see some pinessitting in front of you.

– I brought somegreat pines that we should probablybe incorporating alittle bit more of into our landscapes, andthe first one that I have, this is bristlecone pine.

This one is very,very drought tolerant.

It has a really uniqueappearance to it.

It looks kind of likethe bristles on a brush, and that's kind of why theycall it bristlecone pine.

This one is not a largepine like a ponderosa pine.

It's more of a medium size,about 25 to 30 foot tall, but it can handle the high pHsoils that you'll encounter in central and western Nebraska.

It does not like a lot of water.

It does not like heavy soils, so it's one thatdoes much better after you hit possiblyNorth Platte and west.

The other one that I brought, this one is actuallynative to western Nebraska and this is limber pine.

This is kind ofwhat we try to use in place of white pine out west when you kind of want thatsubtle, soft pine appearance.

This does not tendto winter burn.

It has beautiful cones on it.

It does have a nicepyramidal shape to it.

It gets about 30 to 40feet tall in the landscape.

Probably not as tall in the wild just because of therugged conditions that we'll typically find it in which is right downby Kimball, Nebraska.

– Perfect, and you broughta whole lot of other things, and I think we're probablyalmost out of time, but if we are, what we'regoing to do is suggest maybe that you talk to usagain later on another segment about all the beautyof western Nebraska.

– [Amy] Perfect,thanks for your time.

– [Kim] Thanks, Amy.

– These selectionsoffer seasonal interest, and will give you thattexture and some color during those longwestern winters.

Amy will return next timeon Lifestyle Gardening to tell us about moreselections for western Nebraska.

Alrighty, let's takea few minutes now to answer our viewer emails.

We'd really loveto hear from you.

Perhaps you could also sharea picture or two with us.

Just send us anemail to byf@unl.

Edu.

Our first question this weekcomes from the Hastings area.

It's a questionabout those tree bags that you see on new trees, especially the onesthat are planted in public right-of-wayor in city parks.

They're kind of a green thing.

They're usually downlower than the stake, and the viewer is wonderingwhether this is a good idea or a bad idea.

Well, the answer is yes and yes, (chuckles) depending onhow you actually manage those tree bags.

The idea, of course, isthat you can put them around a new tree,fill them with water, and then the material willallow that water to soak slowly into the root ball.

The positive aspectof that, of course, is it's a way to getwater to the new trees.

The downside is that itcan actually just put water on one side of that new rootball, but more importantly, if they are enclosingthe trunk entirely, one of the issuesthat can happen is you can get all sorts ofrots and spots in there.

You can insects flying in, so you really need to payattention and watch those bags and make sure you takethem off before they create that perfect environmentfor something to live against the trunkof that new three that you might not want.

Our second question comesfrom a viewer in Kearney.

They have the old-fashionedVanhoutte spirea.

They've noticed thata lot of those spirea have been pruned back right now, or have gone all the way tothe ground with the spirea and they're wondering ifthe timing is right on that.

Well, it's hard to kill thebig ol' Vanhoutte spirea but unfortunately, they bloomon what we call old wood, one-year-old wood, which means that ifpruning has happened now chances are you're not goingto great flowering this spring if any at all.

The ideal time to prunethose old Vanhoutte spireas is after they flowerin April or May.

Prune them back then,and at the same time if you possibly can, takesome of the dead wood out so that helps rejuvenate them.

So wait if you haven'talready done it.

If you already have, youprobably have not killed them but the chances of gettinggood flowering this spring are slim and none.

Let's see, our third question actually does come Scotts Bluff, and the is a viewer who wonders about getting better colorin their red-twigged dogwood, but it appearsfrom the photograph like a couple ofthings have happened.

First off, it's maybebeen rounded over.

The shrub has been rounded over, meaning the pruningcuts have taken place all at the same point, and you get kind ofthis witch's broom or twiggy appearance in the top.

The second thing you can notice is there is an awfullot of brownish, or dead-looking, or graytwiggage or canes in that shrub, and that could bea couple of things.

First off, pretty congested with all those newstems in there.

Could be some canker, and red-twigged dogwoodsare prone to canker.

And more importantly,especially if you want the color in the red-twigged dogwoods,you do need to make sure you keep some of that woodrenewed, so the first thing I would suggest tothis particular viewer is take out all of that deador discolored material first.

You're opening up theinterior of the plant, getting rid of some ofthat inoculum for diseases, more air circulation.

Then, take a look at whatyou've got for older canes, take out about a third of those, and that will begin torejuvenate or renew that shrub.

You can take someof the height down, but if you can, try tofeather-cut or stagger it, so you're not cutting all at the same locationin that plant.

Our fourth question for theweek is from a Norfolk viewer.

They have an old redbud ina pretty protected location, but it's a prettyancient old beast, and kind of gettingthin on the top, so not much foliage left.

It does still flower, but theynoticed just this past season a crack that seems toextend all the way from the very first branchesdown to the ground.

They haven't noticed it before.

They're wondering what inthe world might've happened, and is there anythingthey can do about it.

Well, first off, that'sprobably a redbud that is soon to be a deadbud,and that's pretty old for a redbud, but thatcrack is indicative of some pretty majorstructural issues.

It may have been somethingthat was triggered years and years ago bya poor root connection.

It could also havebeen some twisting, some wind shear, thatreally didn't open that track in the trunkuntil just recently.

Dry weather, again,addition to wind could have opened that crack up.

And you know, the likelihoodof that tree surviving, we certainly don't recommendputting a bolt through it or putting a bungeecord around it, but the likelihood ofthat tree surviving, that kind of damageis slim and none, and you'd hate to have that tree fall over and, youknow, damage the house or fall on somebody as they'rewalking up to the front walk.

For our final feature today, we're going to returnto the topic of hops.

If you've been followingBackyard Farmer and LifestyleGardening, you know UNL Agronomy and Horticultureis currently researching the viability of growinghops here in the state.

We featured breeding anda commercial hops grower, and right now, we'd liketo show you the process of harvesting our firsthops crop, which was planted just north of theBackyard Farmer Garden.

(upbeat music) We're getting closer toharvest with our hops project through the Universityof Nebraska, a little bit closerto that nice, crisp, cold adult malt beverage.

So, of course,what we have to do is figure out how to getthe hops off the vine.

Stacey, do you wantto talk a little bit about the kind of machinethat a home brewer would use in doingtheir harvesting, and whether, in fact, theyalso may have to go to a little bit of hand-pickingto get all those hops off? – So, in thecommercial industry, they're usingcone-strippers, basically, to remove the coneoff of the vine, and that's kind of a challenge, because there's nomachinery in the US, so a lot of it's beingimported from Germany.

But there are a couplecompanies that make a machine that's designedfor smaller growers that are under two acres.

However, the homegrower is probably gonna end up doing it all by hand.

– All right.

As with any piece of equipment, sometimes there are afew kinks to work out and some bugs to figure out.

What do you think aregoing to be the issues that we hope to get resolvedbefore we send this out and help our collaboratorsget their harvest managed? – So, we're looking athow to adjust the machine.

It's going to takesome practice, because we havedifferent varieties, and it has to do with theplant structure itself, so there's a few wheelsthat we have to adjust in order to nottear the plant apart but harvest as manycones as possible.

With any machine, we arefinding there's a certain amount of cones that are goingout through the litter, and our goal is to reducethat as much as possible.

So, for the research, Ithink some of the data will just be going onin hand-picking it, because when you'redoing it commercially, you can tolerate alittle bit of loss, so that's what we'retrying to optimize on, is reducing that loss.

– Once we get thosehops out of the chute and into the bin,what happens next? Do they go into cold storage, do we pack themin little baggies and carry them into the kitchen, do they go rightinto the brew vat? – So, as soon as the conesare removed from the plant, we don't have a lot oftime to handle them, because they havevery high moisture, around 80% moisture, sothey do need to go through some sort of a drying system.

It's not heating, really.

We just need toblow air through it.

We have to bringthat moisture content down as quick as possible.

A home person might usesomething like a food dehydrator to do it, or they mightjust have a screen with a fan blowingup underneath.

Commercially, that'swhat they basically are, is just large screenswith fans blowing there.

So, once the moisture contenthas been brought down, they're eithercompressed into bales, or they can be packedinto some packages and vacuum-sealed, and thenthey can be refrigerated to hold them until they'reready for distribution.

– Stacey, in the greenand growing world, a lot of pathogens cantransfer on equipment.

Is that something that we'regoing to be worried about with a harvester,especially if home brewers go into more of aco-op situation? – Yeah, that's areally good question.

That's a concern, becausewe need to make sure that we can keep our fieldsclean and virus-free, and what we're finding isthat the cutting of the vine at the base is wherethere's a vulnerability for these virusesto be transferred, so there does haveto be a clean program figured out, or somesort of protocol by the grower itself, so that'ssomething we need to look at.

– Thanks, Stacey.

You know, this is the year that all of our collaboratorsgot to play.

Next year, we'll becoming back with exactly which ones of these vines hadthe greatest productivity.

We've got a couple more yearson our hops research project.

We've already learned so muchgoing through this process, and I'm sure we'll show you more during the upcoming BackyardFarmer season this spring.

And that's ourprogram for this week.

Next time, we'll be featuring mail-order plantsand taking cuttings.

Don't forget to checkus out on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter,so good afternoon, good gardening,thanks for watching, and we'll see you all nexttime on Lifestyle Gardening.

(inspirational music).

Source: Youtube

Top 23 Easiest Vegetables, Fruits And Herbs To Grow For Beginner Gardeners Top 23 Easiest Vegetables, Fruits And Herbs To Grow For Beginner Gardeners Top 23 Easiest Vegetables, Fruits And Herbs To Grow For Beginner Gardeners Top 23 Easiest Vegetables, Fruits And Herbs To Grow For Beginner Gardeners Top 23 Easiest Vegetables, Fruits And Herbs To Grow For Beginner Gardeners Top 23 Easiest Vegetables, Fruits And Herbs To Grow For Beginner Gardeners Top 23 Easiest Vegetables, Fruits And Herbs To Grow For Beginner Gardeners Top 23 Easiest Vegetables, Fruits And Herbs To Grow For Beginner Gardeners Top 23 Easiest Vegetables, Fruits And Herbs To Grow For Beginner Gardeners Top 23 Easiest Vegetables, Fruits And Herbs To Grow For Beginner Gardeners Top 23 Easiest Vegetables, Fruits And Herbs To Grow For Beginner Gardeners Top 23 Easiest Vegetables, Fruits And Herbs To Grow For Beginner Gardeners.

Source: Youtube

Posted by in growing herbs Tags: , , , on Sep 15, 2019

Hi, I'm Christy Wilhelmi of Gardenerd andthis video is party of the Honeylove Plants for Pollinators series.

This week I'm going to show you all aboutplanting herbs for bees, because herbs flower pretty much all the time, or at least at theend of their life cycle, so they provide pollen and nectar for bees and other pollinators.

Most herbs will flower at the end of the seasonor several times a year if they are perennials.

And they will provide nectar and pollen forbees and other pollinators.

Annual flowers will live out their life cycleand then they'll bolt to seed or push up a center stem and make flowers at the end oftheir life cycle.

So those flowers will attract beneficial insectsand pollinators to your garden.

Always a good thing.

Perennial herbs will flower several timesa year and you can cut them back and they'll renew and they can provide pollen and nectarfor bees and other insects throughout the season.

So those are all good as well.

Let's look at which different kinds you cangrow.

So borage, or borage, depending on how yousay it, is a great plant for pollinators because it refills with nectar every two minutes.

Fantastic.

Plant things like chives, catmint, comfrey,lavender, sage, thyme, oregano, mint, and lemon balm, rosemary and basil.

Basil in particular sends out beautiful flowersand you can grow the annual kind or a perennial variety like an African basil.

And bees love them.

Many herbs can be grown from seed, or youcan buy transplants from the nursery.

If you want to grow perennial herbs that arewoody like Rosemary and lavender.

I recommend starting those from cuttings,or buying transplants from the nursery.

Plant these in well amended soil, and waterwell and once they're established they'll provide flowers for you and your bee friendsfor years to come.

If you like this video, share it with yourfriends, and don't forget to subscribe to Gardenerd and Honeylove where you'll learnall about bee and how to grow food for them and you.

Source: Youtube

before you begin I request you to please subscribe to my channel 10 herbs you can grow indoors and water all year long herbs often have medicinal relaxation and culinary properties and it is great if we can have them throughout the entire year in the home in fact we can we will reveal a way to grow certain herbs in the kitchen and provide a pleasant flavor in it what best about it all is that you do not need to water them regularly nor change the soil and they will be still as flavoursome as if grown in the garden yet you will need to so dill mustard and cilantro seeds in the soil and then transfer them to water as the soil herb cannot be transferred to water as the roots are different from the water route this is how to grow herbs and water put some herb cuttings in glass bottles with plain water and it is best to use bring water if possible as it is high in minerals you should not use chlorinated water as the bleaching chemical can damage the plant tissues you should leave some tap water to air overnight or store some rainwater choose a glass bottle a mason jar or even a plastic bottle for the herbs yet use colored bottles or war of a piece of paper around the bottle as the roots should not be exposed light the darkness will help you avoid algal growth on the bottle and on the route the narrow mouthed container support the cuttings and keep them upright yet avoid narrow or tight-fitting ones as the mouth of the container should support a free transition of air for the roots to be able to breathe you should pick soft cuttings roots and cut some six inch sections from the growing herbs put them in the containers and remove the lower leaves as they can rot in the water and spoils it you can change the water once a week in the case of herbs like rosemary cuttings as soon as the roots start growing within two to six weeks you do not need to change the water to stimulate the routing place some willow branches and warm water overnight and then use them as a soothing hormone mixture you can use some rooting hormone powder as well here are 10 herbs you can grow in watermelon will stimulate nitric oxide production in your body and keep your blood vessels clean consume watermelon regularly as it has numerous health benefits if you like our videos please subscribe like and share this weekend friends and family you.

Source: Youtube

>> GOOD MORNING.

WELCOME TO THE SUNDAY GARDENER.

SPRING IS HERE, THE SUN IS OUT, AND IT IS BEAUTIFUL OUTSIDE.

THE WEATHER HAS BEEN KIND OF STRANGE THIS SEASON SO FAR, BUT IT IS TIME TO GET GROWING.

WE ARE HALFWAY THROUGH APRIL AT THIS STAGE OF THE GAME.

WE WANT TO BE ABLE TO ENJOY THE GARDEN AND ITS BENEFITS.

>> ONE BENEFIT ARE HERBS.

THEY ARE A GREAT WAY TO FLAVOR FOOD AND GET AWAY FROM SALT.

>> THIS IS WHAT I ALWAYS THOUGHT WAS FOR STRAWBERRY.

>> IT IS, BUT IT IS ALSO GREAT FOR SUCCULENTS AND HERBS.

WHAT ARE THESE IS MARGARINE, AND THE OTHER IS OREGANO.

JOHN, YOU CAN START THERE WITH THE PARSLEY.

I WILL GET SOME SAGE IN HERE.

NO ROSEMARY.

ROSEMARY KIND OF GETS ITS OWN POTS.

YOU CAN FEED THEM FROM THE INSIDE OUT OR OUTSIDE IN DEPENDING ON HOW YOU WANT TO DO IT.

I LIKE TO MAKE SURE THE ROOTS ARE DOWN BELOW THE PLANT ON THESE.

>> DID DO IT INSIDE OUT, YOU KIND HAVE TO PULL IT THROUGH WITHOUT DESTROYING.

YOU JUST HAVE TO BE GENTLE.

>> YOU ARE GOOD.

THAT IS NICE.

HERBS JUST NEED SOME REGULAR WATERING AND WE ARE GOOD TO GO.

>> ONCE YOU GET ALL OF THEM DONE, ON THE SIDE — ONCE YOU GET ALL OF THEM DONE ON THE SIDE, YOU CAN STICK ONE IN THE TOP.

>> YOU CAN INCLUDE SOME OF YOUR BIGGER PLANTS LIKE ROSEMARY OR BASIL.

BE A LITTLE CAREFUL.

SOME OF YOUR HERBS ARE PERENNIALS AND SOME ARE NOT.

SOME OF THEM COULD GET LOST IN A FROST.

>> SOMETHING WE COULD STILL SEE THIS YEAR.

SO, NOT A BAD IDEA TO INCLUDE SOME OF THOSE COLD CROPS, BUT WE CAN GENERALLY GET GOING.

>> THE IMPORTANT THING IS TO KEEP HARVESTING.

WE GET A LOT OF ESSENTIAL OILS FROM OUT HERE.

YOU CAN PUT IN SOME LAVENDER IF YOU WANT SOME NICE FRAGRANCE.

THE SKY IS THE LIMIT.

THERE ARE HUNDREDS OF VARIETIES OF HERBS.

>> ON THIS PARTICULAR JOB HERE, IF YOU HAVE A PLACE YOU PUT IT, YET TO MAKE SURE TO ROTATE IT SO THEY CAN ALL GET EQUAL SHOT AT SOME SUNSHINE.

>> IF YOU LOOK AT A BIGGER STRAWBERRY JAR, WHAT SOME PEOPLE DO IS PUT AP VP — PIECE.

Source: Youtube

WHETHER YOU WANT TO PLANT YOUR FIRST TOMATO OR YOU'RE BEEN HARVESTING HERBS FOR YEARS, GROWING YOUR OWN FOOD CAN BE EASY AND EDUCATIONAL.

SOME TIPS ON PLANNING, PLANTING AND GROWING VEGGIES.

THE PLANNING IS THE FIRST PART.

THAT'S RIGHT.

THAT'S THE PHASE WE'RE IN NOW WITH THE COOLER WEATHER.

IT'S A GREAT TIME TO MAYBE TAKE OUT NOTES FROM LAST YEAR.

IF IT'S YOUR FIRST GARDEN START LOOKING INTO THE THINGS THAT YOU MIGHT WANT TO GROW AND WHEN YOU'RE DOING THAT SUNLIGHT IS GOING TO BE YOUR DETERMINING FACTOR.

LOTS OF VEGGIES.

MOST VEGGIES REQUIRE SIX OR EIGHT HOURS OF SUN.

IS THAT TAKING A GOOD SURVEY OF YOUR YARD? YEP.

OFTEN TIME THE IF IT'S IN YOUR LAWN OR GARDEN, A PLACE THAT PARTICULARLY DRIES OUT THAT'S PROBABLY A PLACE THAT'S GETTING FULL SUN.

IF YOU DON'T HAVE A GARDEN THERE, THERE ARE GOOD OPTIONS.

ALTERNATIVE GARDENING METHODS.

CONTAINERS.

DIFFERENT THINGS YOU CAN DO TO GET PLANTS IN THE SUNLIGHT.

THE PLANTING IS THE FIRST STEP.

WHEN IT COMES TIME TO PLANT, YOU BROUGHT THINGS THAT MIGHT BE GOOD FOR PEOPLE TO THINK ABOUT.

I BROUGHT SOME SORT OF REGULAR FAVORITES AND ALSO SOME COOL CROP VEGGIES THAT IF YOU'RE ITCHING TO GET OUTSIDE YOU COULD DO NOW.

IS IT GREENS MOSTLY? IT'S A LOT OF GREENS.

I BROUGHT SOME OF THEM IN FRONT.

LETTUCE IS PROBABLY ONE THE MOST POPULAR.

THERE'S DIFFERENT TYPES OF LETTUCE YOU CAN GET.

THAT'S FUN.

MY KIDS LOVE TO GO OUT TO THE GARDEN AND GET WILL LETTUCE.

AND THAT COMES UP REALLY QUICKLY.

30 DAYS ABOUT.

EVEN STARTING THIS SMALL? YEAH.

KALE, CARROTS, OTHER ROOT VEGETABLES.

RADISHES.

WHAT AM I FORGETTING? SWISS CHARD.

OTHER THINGS LIKE THAT.

IF YOU DO HAVE LOTS OF SUNLIGHT.

TOMATOES AND PEPPERS ARE SOME OF MY FAVORITES.

WE HAVE LOTS OF GREAT VARIETIES.

ALL OF OUR VEGETABLES AND HERBS ARE LOCALLY GROWN.

I SEE A COUPLE DIFFERENT KINDS OF TOMATOES.

THEY LOOK LIKE DIFFERENT PLANT.

THEY ARE.

THERE'S DIFFERENT VARIETIES SUITED FOR DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS.

THIS HANGING BASKET IS MORE OF A TRAILING TOMATO AND DOESN'T NEED MUCH GROUND TO GROW IN.

THERE'S ALSO SMALLER PATIO VARIETIES.

THESE ARE SMALLER, KIND OF CHERRY, GRAPE TOMATOES.

YOU HAVE TO WAIT A LITTLE BIT.

YOU WANT TO WAIT.

YOU CAN RESEARCH IT, MAYBE COME SHOP.

MAY? OUR AVERAGE LAST FROST IS BETWEEN MAY 10th AND MAY 15th.

WE DO HAVE THAT POTENTIAL FOR FROST OVERNIGHT TOO AS WELL.

SO KYLIE LIVES IN THE CITY.

HERB GARDENS, URBAN HERB GARDENS ARE HUGE RIGHT NOW.

YEAH, ABSOLUTELY.

ANOTHER THING YOU COULD ADD TO THAT HERB GARDEN WOULD BE MINT.

THIS IS REALLY POPULAR FOR US.

THIS IS MOJITO MINT.

EXCELLENT FOR THE SUMMER TIME DRINKS.

YOU KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH THAT.

I'M FAMILIAR.

THERE'S GREAT STRAWBERRY JARS OR HERB JARS IF YOU JUST HAVE A SMALL SPACE.

YOU CAN FIT LOTS OF DIFFERENT TYPES OR VARIETIES.

I'LL JUST BRING THAT BACK WITH ME.

THIS IS NOT THE LAST TIME I'M GOING TO SEE ADAM TODAY.

ADAM WILL BE A PART OF THE ART IN BLOOM FASHION SHOW.

CALLED FLOWERS AFTER HOURS AT THE MINNEAPOLIS INSTITUTE OF ARTS TONIGHT.

ART IN BLOOM GOES FOR FOUR DAYS.

BACHMAN'S HELPS DESIGN THESE BEAUTIFUL FLOWER DISPLAYS INSPIRED BY THE ART IN THE MUSEUM.

TONIGHT KAREN AND I ARE GOING TO EMCEE THIS.

YES.

YOU ARE ONE OF THE FASHION MODELS.

WHAT ARE YOU WEARING? YOU'LL HAVE TO COME TO ATTEND.

IS THIS GARDENING ATTIRE? YEAH, THIS IS GARDENING HIGH FASHION.

YOU'LL BE DECORATED WITH FLOWERS AND PLANTS.

I HAVEN'T SEEN IT YET.

I'VE HEARD THERE'S A HEAD DRESS.

IT'S FREE.

6:00, 7:00.

DO THE SHOW TWICE.

COME AND SEE US.

Source: Youtube

Grow more bountiful veggies with Miracle-Gro Garden Soil for Vegetables & Herbs.

This soil is enriched with Moisture Control technology to help protect against over and under-watering.

It's specially designed for in-ground use and feeds plants for up to 3 months.

To start, apply a 3 inch layer of garden soil over the area to be planted and mix it into the top 6 to 8 inches of native soil.

Then add your plants or seeds.

Be sure to check the plant tag or seed packet for spacing recommendations.

After planting, water your vegetables and herbs thoroughly.

And for even greater results, start a feeding routine thirty days after planting.

Grow a bigger, more bountiful harvest with Miracle-Gro Garden Soil for Vegetables & Herbs.

Source: Youtube

Posted by in growing herbs Tags: , , , , , , , , on Sep 15, 2019

Hey guys, it's Karyn the Lost Lemurian, welcometo another video.

Today I would like to share with you fivecommon garden herbs that you can use in spells.

Hi everyone, so if this is your first timeto my channel then welcome, I make videos about spirituality, veganism, environmentalism,slow responsible travel and the zero waste lifestyle, so if you like any of that pleasehit the subscribe button and don't forget to hit the bell button as well so that youget notified whenever there's a new video up.

Today I would like to share with you fivecommon herbs that you may have in your own garden right now that can all be used in spellsor other magic.

Now most of the footage that I took for thisvideo I actually took before I left Australia, so that was in about April or so, maybe lateMarch and at that point, because Australia was starting to come into winter, a lot ofthe plants were not looking their best.

They were starting to withdraw for winterand so forth.

If I had taken the footage maybe a month ortwo earlier, they would have been much more vibrant.

There would have been many more flowers.

So these plants are not at their peak butfortunately you still can use them no matter what time of year it is because some of theseplants the flowers have properties, some the leaves have properties, some even have fruit.

And I hope you'll be able to get a lot outof this video regardless.

Also, keep in mind what I have mentioned inother videos, that when you're doing any kind of spellwork everything's about symbologyand its all about what the symbol means for you.

So each of these plants has a rich folklorichistory among many different cultures and if you identify strongly with one particularculture, whether it's your heritage or whether you just like that particular culture, thenthat plant's gonna have a certain meaning for you and you can actually incorporate thatinto your magic.

So for example the rose, in Middle Easterncultures that is a symbol of fidelity, so if you are from a Middle Eastern backgroundor identify strongly with that culture then you might wanna use that symbolism in yourspellwork.

So let's begin, and the first plant I wannashow you is lavender.

So I'm sure you know about the relaxing propertiesof lavender.

We're all familiar with lavender oil and lavenderincense and so forth.

There is a reason for that.

This plant is associated with peace, withrestful sleep, so if you are having sleep issues you can do a spell using lavender.

It's also associated with love so you canput it in a love spell and beauty as well.

It also can be used to keep your mind sharpand also to encourage fertility if you're having issues in that area.

Secondly, sage and again if you're alreadypracticing magic you will be familiar with this.

Sage is the great purifier.

So, there is a reason that we use sage sticksto purify a space, whether it be a room, a house or even just a circle.

If there are any earthbound spirits who areinhabiting a place and don't wanna leave, then this can encourage them to move on.

Sage is also great for granting wishes, soyou can write your wish on a sage leaf and sleep with it under your pillow for threenights.

I'm sure you will find many spells to do withthis particular herb.

The white sage is the best one for clearingnegativity out of a space and if you happen to have it, all you simply do is you walkthree times around the space.

If you're in the Southern Hemisphere, workanti clockwise.

If you're in the Northern Hemisphere, workclockwise, so that's going with the sun and hold the intention of the space being purified.

It's a really great way to get rid of somenegative energy if you've had a hard time in your life as well.

Third we have rosemary and this herb helpsus to honour the past.

So, if you're wanting to connect with yourancestors or even just, you know, immediate family or so forth or even just to honoursomething that happened earlier in your life, this is a great one.

It's fantastic for memory and for studying,so you may wish to burn it while you're studying.

It also has strong connections with Christianityso if you are dealing with any issues religiously or if you're a Christian witch, you'll lovethis one.

Rosemary is great in ritual baths, it canhelp you remember your past lives and like so many herbs it's also associated with love.

Speaking of love, the next one is rose.

So this one is incredibly popular and common.

I'm guessing that if you don't have rose yourselfyou know somebody that does.

This flower is associated with love as I mentionedand that spans many cultures.

There's a reason why it's such a significantthing to give a bouquet of roses.

The petals can be burned or added to incense.

The colours of the rose is really importantas well.

So red is obviously deep deep love.

Light pink is like, early love or puppy love.

White is innocence and if you have any otherstrong connections with other colours, then by all means use that in your spellwork.

And finally we have lemon verbena.

Now again this one is also associated withlove, so you can use it in a love spell but it's also associated with beauty.

Now it's definitely not a bad thing to doa beauty spell.

We all want to feel good about ourselves,so this herb can help you with that.

You can also place it under your pillow toprevent dreams if you're having issues in that area.

I also make this one into a tea and I thinkits really yummy.

Now obviously there are far more herbs thatone would consider common but these were just five that I decided to share with you today.

Please let me know what your favourite commonherbs are down below and any advice you might have for a newbie starting out with theirspellwork using herbs, perhaps in their own garden.

I believe that it is more powerful to useherbs that you've grown yourself, because your energy is infused in them and you havethat connection and it's something that you've nurtured from the soil on which you live,so definitely I would recommend that over buying herbs from someone, let's say on eBayor online or something, not that there's anything wrong with that, I just do think it's morepowerful if it's your own herb.

Let me know if you enjoyed this video andif you would like to learn more about the various kinds of herbs you can use in spells.

Don't forget to give me a thumbs up if youenjoyed the video, subscribe if you haven't already and follow me on all my social media.

I will see you next time and don't forget,just be kind, it's not hard.

Bye.

Source: Youtube

Why not grow some herbs in your garden and these herbs here are not only great for cooking but they can also be planted throughout a garden design plan We have Lemon Thyme, Oregano, Peppermint and Rosemary.

Source: Youtube

Posted by in growing herbs Tags: , , , , , , on Sep 14, 2019

If you're afraid of killing every plant youown, which could be, or you just want your garden to be really simple because you travela lot, and maybe you're off at conferences, and conventions, and here and there, everywhere,and you can't always be around to water your garden.

I would suggest you grow Thyme, because it'sincredibly durable.

It takes heat.

It takes part shade.

You can bake it.

I mean, in the hot sun and it will continueto thrive.

It's super hardy.

It's hardy down to like zone five, I thinkif I have that right.

So, it can take snow load and it will keepproducing for you.

And then, towards the end of the season, you'llhave beautiful flowers.

I definitely say Thyme.

And then Mint in a container, only.

Mint, you have to grow Mint for mojitos, andsalads, and salad dressings and everything wonderful.

And then, Rosemary.

You hardly ever have to water it.

Um, and I can't imagine a garden without Rosemary.

Um, it’s something my family's always grownand, whenever I've moved gardens, Rosemary is one of the first things I've planted.

And as long as you give it, again I mentionedthis before, but as long as you give it um, light, well-draining soil, and water it maybeonce a week, maybe even twice a week depending upon your weather, um it will keep growing.

And that would be three of probably the mostlow-maintenance plants you could ever grow.

Source: Youtube

Hi, I'm Heidi Rader.

I'm with UAFCooperative Extension Service and Tanana Chiefs Conference.

I'm here at the Georgeson Botanical Garden at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and today we'regoing to talk all about herbs that you can grow in Alaska and how toharvest them.

So you can grow a lot of herbs here in Alaska, they like prettysimilar conditions to your vegetables: neutral pH, well-drained soil.

Butmany of them are not perennial as they are in other parts of the world.

We dohave a few exceptions, chives and Welsh or Siberian onions are perennial as wellas mint in some areas of Alaska.

These are chives here and they actually willreseed and can kind of spread throughout your garden as do the Siberian onions soyou do want to be careful where you plant them.

Chives is kind of amild onion flavor and the Siberian onions is a much stronger onion typeflavor.

But you can use them in dishes where you'd use onions and you know justchop them up finely.

Ideally you want to use them before they flowered as oncethey flowered they get to be quite woody.

But this one you can still cut off theflowers and some people even like to deep-fry the flowers.

This one isstill good, this one's a little bit old.

The sprigs that have notflowered are still good to use so you can just cut them down near the base anduse those in a lot of dishes.

There's some grass in here too which you do notwant to eat.

So those are your chives and Siberian onions.

Over here we have quitea few varieties of lavender.

Lavender is great in tea, it's great for aromatherapy,you can also make a simple syrup and infused baked goods with youryour lavender flavor.

Just boil down some of the lavender leaves and then addsugar for that.

So here's our varieties of lavender and as you can see it'squite productive and grows well here in Alaska.

Many of the herbs that we growhere in Alaska need to be started in a greenhouse.

Some of them can take quite along time, about five months, so you may want to just purchase your transplantsfrom a greenhouse especially if you're only going to need one or two plants.

Anda few you can direct feed in the garden like dill or chervil.

Here we haveThai basil, sweet basil, we've got dill that's flowered here andnow is really good for pickling.

Over here we've got rosemary, tarragon, flatleaf parsley, and so Thai basil goes really well in a variety of Thai disheslike curry or spring rolls.

Thai dishes use a lot of fresh herbs.

Dill is greaton salmon for making dips and for pickling at the end of the year.

Ofcourse basil you can make pesto or you can add it to pizza and pasta, all kindsof things.

Rosemary is also a common Italian herb, it also goes really wellwith potatoes.

Rosemary is a little bit stronger than some of your other herbsand so you want to be a little bit more judicious and how much you use.

Andtarragon has a little bit of a licorice flavor and goes really well in saladdressings or on fish and in soups.

Some herbs you're going to want to addit towards the end of cooking so you don't destroyflavor and things like tarragon especially lose their flavor if cookedtoo long.

So others like rosemary or bay leaves you can cook quite a long timeand they'll retain their flavor.

So if I were to harvest these types of herbs youwant to harvest just enough so you promote continued leaf development.

So Iwouldn't want to cut off this entire rosemary sprig here because then Iwouldn't get as much leaf development throughout the summer so I'dprobably just take these side shoots here and maybe the top here to promotecontinued branching and leaf development.

But it is good to routinely use yourherbs so that they don't go to flower because at this point they become quitewoody and you know you can still use this in pickling this dill but it's notquite as tender as if it had not gone to flower and then you can use it in dipsand actually eat the leaf still because it's still quite tender.

Same with thisbasil, you want to continue to to pick off these side shoots before it flowersand and to continue to promote the leaf development.

So I would just cut offthese side shoots to promote continued leaf development.

Here we have chervil, this is also alicorice type flavor here and it doesn't dry well so you don't generally see itfor sale as a dried herb and so it's another great reason to grow your ownherbs because you can harvest it as you like and as you need it.

This is lemonbalm here which as the name implies it's a kind of a lemony flavor that's a greatthing to use in teas and and other things like maybe on fish or chicken where youwant that lemony type flavor.

Over here we've got a Japanese herb called perillashishu, and that's used in sushi and other Japanese cuisine and quiteproductive here as you can see.

We've got Sorrell here, also quiteproductive.

Cress, sorry that was Sorrell, purple basil, andthere's so many different varieties of herbs another great reason to grow yourown herbs like your vegetables, you know you may be able to find one type offresh basil at the store but if you grow your own, you've got manymany types.

This is cilantro here used in a lot of Mexican dishes.

Some people loveit some people hate it.

I'm one of the latter.

This is lettuce leaf basil herequite productive and huge leaves here.

You can grow lots andlots of herbs here in Alaska and our short growing season.

Unfortunately manyof them are not perennial but either by growing your own transplants orpurchasing them from a greenhouse you can really have a productive herb garden.

So that's that's all about herbs today in which you can grow here in Alaska.

I'mHeidi Rader with UAF Cooperative Extension Service and we'll be doing acouple other videos here on cooking and preserving herbs, so check those out.

I'll see you later.

Source: Youtube

Organic Heirloom Basil Organic Heirloom Basil- Newly Planted Candle Cactus- Miniature Bunny Ear Cactus Aloe Vera- Medical Grade Mexican Sedum.

Source: Youtube

Hi, I'm Heidi Rader.

I'm with UAFCooperative Extension Service and Tanana Chiefs Conference.

I'm here at the Georgeson Botanical Garden at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

And I'm talkingabout using herbs and cooking and storing herbs today.

In another video, Italked about all the different kinds of herbs you can grow here in Alaska andtoday I'll be talking about how to use those herbs and how to store those herbs.

A couple ones I didn't mention in another video are marjoram, oregano, and thyme.

These ones are used in a lot of Italian cooking and soupsand are great all-purpose type of herb.

The nice thing about growing your own herbs is you can use them as you need them in everything fromsoups to salads to baked goods to breads.

It's really a question of what can't youuse herbs in.

And they're really quite flexible too.

Spices, especiallycayenne or red pepper flakes you'll notice, if you use more than the recipecalled for.

But herbs are generally pretty flexible, and you can play aroundwith different flavor combinations that you like and an experiment.

A greattime to harvest herbs is in the morning to promote the most flavor ofyour herbs before the heat of the day.

So how you want to harvest herbs isyou don't want to mow down the entire plant but you do just want to takecuttings and promote continued leaf development.

So take cuttings fromthroughout the plant not just one area.

And it's actually good to routinely useyour herbs and to use them before they have gone to flower as then theyget a little bit woody are not quite as flavorful.

I'mharvesting some marjoram here.

So couple things, if you wanted to use the herbsright away then you'd want to strip the herbs from the stems and just use theherbs and you can even use the flowers.

But you don't generally want touse the the stems as they can be pretty woody and difficult to chew if youwanted to dry these herbs, and it works well for woody type herbs, to hang themin a bundle and hang them up to dry.

So for things like basil which are more ofa tender herb the best way to dry them is in a dehydrator, or on a screen asthey will crumble a little bit if you make a bundle.

But I would just takethese herbs, and let's grab a few more over here, and make a little bundle.

You could hang these up to dry like that you could also just make a bundle forputting in a soup.

That's called a bouquet garni.

You could also put it in alittle bit of cheesecloth and then pull out the whole bundle.

And then you don'tneed to worry about stripping off the leaves off from the stem and you can justtake the whole thing out and you've imparted a lot of the flavor.

But anothergreat thing to do is just take the leaves off the stem and then just chopit and use it in whatever dish you're planning on.

Salad or soup andwhatnot.

Another thing you can do is chop or blend or use a food processor andblend up your herbs and then mix them with oil.

So maybe a couple cups of anyfresh herb and a half cup of oil that really helps preserve the flavor andthe essential oils as well.

And then you can freeze it you could even put it inan ice cube tray and then you have an easyway to just use a little bit of herbs at a time.

Another common thing to do withbasil especially but you can use a lot of different types of herbs is tomake pesto.

So for pesto you're going to want about2 cups of packed basil, you're gonna wet about 1/2 cup pine nuts,1/2 a cup of parmesan, 3/4 cups of olive oil, and a couple cloves of garlic.

Soyou would blend all of that up or you can chop it very finely, which is alittle bit more work, but that's what I have here.

Mix it all up togetherand that makes a really nice sauce for pasta for pizza, or even sandwiches.

And you don't have to use basil, you can use something like arugulainstead of pine nuts, you could use walnuts, and you can really experimentwith the general concept behind pesto too to preserve your herbs.

Another thingyou can do is use herbs in tea, either dried or fresh, so lemon balm is anexcellent herb for making a tea.

I'll just harvest a little bit here of lemonbalm.

It has a really nice lemony flavor and that makes an excellent tea and soyou would just want to chop it.

You also want to bruise your herbs a little bitbefore you use them and that will release some of their flavors.

Anotherway you can preserve herbs is if you buy them from the farmers market or thestore, you can simply put them in a vase of water with the stems down.

Much likeyou would a bouquet of flowers and that will really enhance how long the theherbs keep as well.

Of course if you have your ownherb garden you don't really need to harvest them in advance of whenyou're cooking them, so you don't really need to do that.

But especially if youbuy them from the farmers market just put it in a vase like you would abouquet of flowers.

Another great way to preserve herbs and nice way to use themis by adding adding them to vinegar.

So you want a sterile jar, and you can useany type of herbs that you think would taste good.

This is basil and marjoram and you want to just pack the jar and with your freshherbs.

Bruise them a little bit, then add vinegar to it.

You don't need toheat up the vinegar, but you can heat up the vinegar if you want yourvinegar to be flavored more quickly.

So pack in your herbs, this purple basil isgoing to turn the vinegar a nice crimson color and you know let it sit for two orthree days, and then you'll have a nice, flavorful vinegar that will keep forquite a long time.

Good types of vinegars to use are rice vinegar or white winevinegar.

You don't want to use apple cider vinegar, for instance, because theflavor is so strong you probably will not taste the herbs as well.

So those aredifferent ways to store and preserve and use herbs from your Alaskan garden.

Ohand one more thing, I want to show you.

UAF Cooperative Extension Service has agreat book.

It's called An Alaskan Herb Garden.

It's all about which herbs youcan grow here in Alaska, how to cook with them, how to preservethem.

So pick that up at our website for $15 and check back weekly for more videos here In the Alaska Garden.

I'mHeidi Rader here with Cooperative Extension Service and Tanana ChiefsConference.

Thanks for listening.

Source: Youtube

TNTAXHOLIDAY.

COM.

THANK YOU SO MUCH.

NOW LET'S HEAD OUT TO TUWANDA.

>> Tuwanda: NOTHING LIKE A GOOD COLD GLASS OF LEMON INFUSED WATER ON A HOT SUMMER DAY LIKE TODAY.

SO YOU KNOW, HERBS, LEMON HERBS ADD SO MUCH FLAVOR TO WATER, FOOD, AND, THERE ARE MANY DIFFERENT TYPES OF HERBS THAT ARE LEMON.

CINDY SHAPETON HAS MORE THAN FIVE VARIETIES OF LEMON HERBS AND WE'LL TALK ABOUT THAT TODAY.

YOU MADE THIS FRESH, FRESH JAR OF WATER FOR MY PHOTOGRAPHER AN I.

THANK YOU.

>> YOU ARE WELCOME! >> Tuwanda: LET'S TALK ABOUT THE LEMON HERBS.

>> FIRST, LEMONGRASS.

I KEEP IT IN A CONTAINER BECAUSE IT IS TROPICAL AND YOU TAKE IT IN FOR THE WINTER AND I'LL HAVE TO DIG IT UP.

A LOT OF TIMES I HAVE IT IN THE GARDEN AND DIG IT UP BUT THIS YEAR A LEFT IT IN THIS CONTAINER.

AND I THINK MOST PEOPLE HAVE HEARD OF LEMONGRASS, AND I DRY IT AND THEN I, YOU KNOW, BREAK IT UP AND PUT IT INTO A JAR FOR WINTER.

AND I ADD IT TO MY TEA BECAUSE IT ACTUALLY HELPS THOSE, YOU KNOW, THOSE ANNOYING LITTLE ACHES AND PAI WE GET, IT HELPS TO TAKE THE EDGE OFF OF THOSE.

AND I ADD IT TO MY TEA.

I'M TRYING TO WRAP IT ONE-HANDED.

>> Tuwanda: AND YOU WRAP IT.

>> YES.

I HARVEST THE BEANS AND I'LL WRAP IT AROUND AND JUST KIND OF TIE IT.

AND I'LL LET YOU — HERE, I'LL HOLD THE BEANS AND YOU TIE IT.

THERE YOU GO.

GET ONE MORE — THIS IS OH, SO MARTHA AND OH, SO EASY! >> Tuwanda: AND YOU GET THE GREAT FLAVOR.

>> AND PUT IT ON THE GRILL OR STEAM IT LIKE THIS AND IT IMPARTS THE NICE LEMON FLAVOR AND LOOK COOL WHEN YOU SERVE IT.

>> Tuwanda: WE GET THE IDEA! FANTASTIC! WE HAVE LEMONGRASS.

>> THE FIRST ONE.

NOW, WE HAVE, ONE OF MY FAVORITES WHICH WAS IN THE INFUSED WATER.

IT IS LEMON BASIL.

JUST NOTHING LIKE IT.

>> WHAT DO YOU USE IT FOR? >> YOU WANT A GREAT DISH COOK PASTA AND USE LOTS OF BUT YOUR AND THIS, CUT THE LEAVES OFF AND PUT IT ON THERE.

THERE IS NOTHING LIKE IT AND I FUSED WATER WITH IT AND I MAKE TIE WITH IT ALL THE TIME.

THIS IS A HAPPY HERB AND RAISES OUR SEROTONIN LEVELS, AND I TRY TO DRINK IT ALL THE TIME.

>> THAT WATER IS CERTAINLY GOOD WITH THIS IN THERE.

>> AND THERE IS LEMON BALM.

AS IF WE DON'T HAVE ENOUGH LEMON.

IN OUR TEA ROOM THIS IS A HARDY PERENNIAL, AND THE GREEK NAME IS BEE, AND BEE KEEPERS PLANTED IT BECAUSE THEY THOUGHT IT BROUGHT IN THE BEES.

BEES LOVE THE FLOWERS, IT IS LEMONY AND TAKE A SPRIG AND PUT IT INTO YOUR WATER AND YOU DON'T NEED LEMON.

AND PUT IT ON YOUR CHEC U YOUR CHICKEN.

THIS IS LEMON THYME.

>> Tuwanda: A LEMON FLAVOR.

>> CAN'T GET ENOUGH OF IT, CAN YOU? >>.

>> Tuwanda: NO.

>> HERE'S THE LEMON THYME.

AND THIS IS ANOTHER ONE THAT IS JUST WONDERFUL.

IF YOU PUT IT IN SOME MARIAN — MARINATE IT IN OLIVE OIL AND USE IT LIKE A BARBECUE.

TAKE ROSEMARY, A PIECE OF ROSE MAR AND RUB IT ON YOUR — ROSEMARY AND RUB IT ON THE CHICKEN AND PUT IT ON THE GRILL AND IT IMPARTS THE LOVELY FLAVOR.

THESE ARE TWO HARDY PERENNIALS.

NOW, WE HAVE ANOTHER TROPICAL CALLED LEMON VERBINA AND THIS, AGAIN I KEEP IN A CONTAINER.

IT IS VERY LEMONY AND I BRING IT IN FOR THE WINTER BECAUSE IT CAN FREEZE.

BUT IT IS AWESOME JELLY MATERIAL.

MAKES THE BEST LEMON JELLY.

THESE ARE ALL WONDERFUL.

>> Tuwanda: I LOVE THE FLAVOR OF LEMON, AND, THIS IS INCREDIBLE.

HOW CAN FOLKS FIND OUT MORE.

>> FIND ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE, THE CRACKPOT GARDENER AND GO TO THE WEB SITE CINDY SHAPTON.

COM AND YOU CAN FIND THE SCHEDULE ON THE FACEBOOK PAGE.

>> Tuwanda: SOUNDS TERRIFIC.

>> AND FIND WE AT THE FARMERS.

Source: Youtube

Posted by in growing herbs Tags: , , on Sep 14, 2019

Today in lecture, we're going to be talking about different ways that we can categorize plants.

And one of the categories will be talking about are herbs compared to woody plants.

So I wanted to spend a minute now and talk about what this difference is because the way we use herbs, generally speaking in normal use, it's a little bit different than how we use it botanically.

So in normal use, an herb is something that is fragrant, and savory, and often used for cooking.

For example here, we have oregano, and oregano is typically used in something like Mexican cooking.

It's got a strong minty sort of odor.

So this is something that we would call an herb in a culinary sense, however, if we look at the base of an oregano stem, we can see that the stem is very thick and hard to break.

That's because it actually has true wood at least down here at the base.

So therefore, botanically speaking, this would be a woody plant.

And In your reading you will see what defines a woody plant compared to an herbaceous plant.

So this is oregano.

I'm going to show you one more herb, while we are talking about it.

Over here we have a second herb that also falls into this category.

It is a culinary herb because it has a savory fragrance.

This is rosemary.

Rosemary has a sort of piney aroma to it.

However, you can see, even without me breaking the stem, that there is fairly thick wood down near the base, and so in the botanical sense, this is still going to be a woody plant, not a true herb.

And I'm going to show you by contrast what a true herb might be.

So first we can call the grass and all of these weeds true herbs because their stems never thicken.

Also the squash plant over here.

Even though the stem is thick, if I were to squeeze it I would easily break it, because it hasn't formed any true wood.

So this we would never call an herb in a culinary sense because it doesn't have a strong aroma.

However, in a botanical sense, this would count as an herb.

Source: Youtube

(Music throughout video) Spinning, vertical herb tower Made with a wood or metal tomato cage Use a strong plant dolly Use a large container Use pre-planted container or plant directly in pot Place tomato cage securely in large container Add coco liner to wire baskets Use velcro tape to secure basket to tomato cage frame Continue securing all baskets to the frame with velcro tape Wedge baskets into frame for best support Fill with "Edna's Best" potting soil, EB Stone Organics Spray water on baskets and soil to moisten Plant your herbs! Done! Enjoy your vertical herb tower! Lettuce and basil Purple basil Harvest herbs from 4 to 8 baskets! Spin your "Living Spice Rack!" MATERIALS.

Source: Youtube

Posted by in growing herbs Tags: , , , , , on Sep 14, 2019

♪ [music] ♪ – [Beverly] Welcome to theArbor Gate.

I'm Beverly Welch, here today with my dear friend Ann Wheelerof Loghouse Herbs.

It is the dog days of summer here on the Gulf Coast, but wewant to make sure that you understand, we can plant any time.

So we decided toput together this gorgeous garden.

– [Ann] Beautiful.

– Low maintenance, insectresistant, deer resistant, drought tolerant once established,just a beautiful garden.

And these are all.

Yes,these are all herbs.

– Every single one of them.

– And we want you to understandthat not all herbs have to be culinary.

An herb is just a usefulplant, so it may be medicinal, it may be aromatic,and it may be culinary.

– That's absolutely right.

And those properties can be found throughout this garden,in every single plant.

– And we have morefun putting it together.

– Putting it together, yes.

– We wanted to point out a fewplants that you may be overlooking, but qualify in your herb gardenand in your landscape in general.

– And each one of them that we'regoing to talk about specifically today has a special role to play.

– It does.

– One way or another.

– So we're going to pick out justa few of our favorites along the way.

– Yes.

– So would you like to get started now? – I certainly would.

That's a beautifulone, and I love it because A, it is an oregano, which means it'sreally especially easy to grow.

It fills some space in the garden, andit really is colorful.

This is its color, this golden green.

Stunning.

– Stunning as is and great in containers.

– Great for the containers,spilling over the edge.

– I love the artemisias.

Theyare going to offer fragrance, but what beautiful texture and foliagecolor that they add.

They make anything bright and light, like this gorgeousEchinacea right up against this silver foliage.

So this is one of my favorites.

– Yes, it's a beautiful contrast to thecolor, and it also fills space.

– It does.

Another often overlookedgem is the Mexican oregano.

It almost makes, here on the GulfCoast, a semi evergreen shrub, depending on our winter.

It blooms allsummer.

It's a great mounder, three to four feet tall and wide,and a great pollinating plant.

The hummingbirds, the butterflies, lovethese beautiful lavender blooms.

– The shrub, once it makes the shrubform, will be covered with these sweet little lavender blooms.

– Right.

Beautiful in a cottage garden.

– Yes.

– Beautiful.

Another one that is oftenoverlooked in the herb house is the cat mint, and you don't haveto have a cat to grow it.

– Cat mint is a very traditionalplant in an English cottage garden, and it is not, in fact, cat nip.

It is a whole different name, horticulturally speaking.

And it's abeautiful, soft, gray green color.

Once again with lavender flowersthat attract pollinators.

In fact, almost all of these attracta lot of pollinators.

– Absolutely.

– And beneficial insects as well.

– And you know what people missby not using these aromatic plants in their garden are the fragrances.

Whenyou're out in the garden, you're working, you rub up against them, even when youget a nice breeze in the summer, it's so refreshing, it's so nice in the eveningsto walk out and just smell.

– Smell the air.

– Exactly.

– And a little sprinkle ofrain brings that aroma to the front.

– Right.

One of my favorites is thetagetes, the Mexican marigold, that anise fragrance.

It's agreat tarragon substitute, but a brilliant, brilliantperennial on the Gulf Coast.

– And in the fall, it'scovered with yellow flowers, just masses of them.

So it isan amazing floral.

– It is.

-.

Contributor as well.

And same with this one.

– Yes.

And it is, again, the fragrance,great repellents for our deer.

– Yeah.

And Copper CanyonDaisy is the name of this one, and it's extremely aromatic.

– It is.

And I know some of yourfavorites are the thymes.

– Absolutely.

This is one ofmy very favorites.

For one thing, the silver thyme is a good culinary thyme,but also it is has this upright habit that makes it so easy to harvest for thekitchen.

An a spot of silver in the garden never goes wrong.

– No, never.

– Beautiful.

– Well, you know, oftentimes,and we keep mentioning, a lot of these guys are evergreen.

This isa myrtus communis, or a true myrtle.

Not to be confused with wax myrtle.

This, again, makes a nice compactshrub, three to four feet tall and wide.

The foliage is very aromatic,actually culinary.

And it gets covered during the summer with this sweet,white flower that is itself aromatic.

– And I believe, correct meif I'm wrong, but the flowers are traditionally used in bridal bouquets.

– It's true.

That's true.

– So if there's awedding in your future.

– That's always a good one to have.

Anda lot of these, too, we haven't mentioned, we keep talking about the sun, but a lotof these are quite appropriate in what we call high shade, bright shade, part shade.

I know the oreganos function very well.

– And the rosemary.

– And the rosemary as well.

– We haven't talked about rosemarytoday, but the rosemary's quite happy in partial or high shade.

Andespecially in the summer afternoons in this part of Texas.

– Oh, we all appreciate alittle afternoon shade.

– A little afternoon shade.

– And so, getting more toa little bit of a shadier garden, you can't go wrong with lemon balm or limebalm.

And I love the southernwood.

And people, again, often overlook thiswonderful texture, this citrus type fragrance, but what a greataddition to a fern garden.

– Absolutely.

And also, theygo very well in a planting of azaleas.

– Oh, nice.

– So that's kind of a traditionaluse of southernwood.

– Absolutely.

And anotherone is the chile piquin, and this variegated chile pequinabsolutely has to have some afternoon shade.

So you've got yourpeppers, your bloom, and the birds love it even if you're not a fan of hot peppers.

But this is a great addition.

– It's a beautiful shape.

It's abeautiful, thick, shrubby look.

– It is.

It is nice.

– This is one that appealsto many people at the moment, who are learning to do Asian cooking.

Although it's a beautiful landscape plant, it's a ground cover for shade, it'scalled Vietnamese Coriander.

And so it melds the culinary with thelandscaping qualities that we look for.

It will spread itself about in a shadyarea, and it likes moisture so you could plant this where your lawn sprinkler hits.

– Exactly.

And you know, wecan't.

We're not successful with cilantro during the summer.

– No.

-.

Here on the Gulf Coast,so this is your substitute.

You've got that cilantro flavorwith a slight citrus undertone.

– And it's a real find for us.

– It is find.

So, anyother favorites that, you know, we went right past the lemon verbena.

– The lemon verbena isincredible to brush against.

– It is.

It makes a wonderful tea.

– Because of the wonderful scent,wonderful tea.

Of course, we always talk about rosemary, but we just want topoint out that that's a part of this herb garden, and it's.

We have it positioneddown here at the somewhat shaded end.

– Yes, we do.

Yes, we do.

– Interestingly enough.

– So this is beautiful, Ann.

– I think it is, too.

Weneed to get to work.

– Let's go.

♪ [music] ♪.

Source: Youtube

It's so cool to see something newsprouting up in the Hill Country.

Thanks so much for sharing your greatoperations with us, looking forward to eating some of those mushrooms.

Right now, however, we're gonna be talking about herbs and we are joined by Ann McCormackwho's back the urban urban cowgirl and cowgirl it's great to have you back onthe program.

We had lots of fun last time you're on the show.

We're gonna betalking about a very special herb for Austin and Central Texas, cilantro.

Cilantro, oh very very much beloved in Texas but it's one of the herbs thatpeople will have problems in in years where we have very high heat becausethey don't understand that in the real high temperature cilantro simply willnot survive.

And I often get questions from poor gardeners who justfeel that they have just failed miserably because their cilantro died.

Bythe time we get to in late June early July and I am so happy to be able to sayto them it's not you it's just the plant.

And once they understand that it's acool weather herb and here in Texas what that means is we have to grow it and twoseasons one is the very beginning of the year like as early as February so it'll grow during the cooler months and then by like I said byMemorial Day it starts to head towards seeds of course the seeds arecoriander seeds which are edible also.

Right, and when it bolts it'sactually quite attractive.

It is but it just makes people who want to have cilantro leaves.

So, what you do is Labor Day comes around plant it again.

Asthe temperatures again start to slowly cool you will have a second productionof the leaves that people want and they can enjoy that pretty much until thefirst frost which sometimes is very late in December.

So we encouragepeople to grow cilantro as just a two season herb and they won't haveanxieties over why their tacos are lacking cilantrobecause it is definitely a plant that's a staple in Tex-Mex food.

It's wonderful now for those people who are heating the advice and will want toplant some in the fall.

Are there any special precautions when the weather does turn cold? Not particularly because it really does tolerate coolertemperatures it's like basil when we really get to the point where we have ahard frost it will die it is an annual sure and that's normal but you will beable to have production for if you if you plant in September you know OctoberNovember and well into December and you can have plenty of tacos and enchiladaswith your own fresh cilantro on them.

And just real basic cultivation on cilantroI'm assuming full Sun? Yes and they do pretty well with some moisture.

Theydo like to have regular moisture and of course with the cooler temperatures youwon't have to water them as much they can grow in the ground as well as in apot but they really do need to be outside.

They're really not an indoorwindowsill herb.

A lot of people try that.

Most herbs that we use for cooking are nativeto the Mediterranean area, as is cilantro.

And so you just really need that sun.

Okay, so problem solved.

I would hope so.

Now another thing that you wanted to do this isn't about manger herbs.

Yes and I was completelyunfamiliar with this term I know what a manger is oh but there are a lot of oldtraditions symbolism associated with herbs and flowers and trees but aroundChristmas time there are certain herbs that are considered particularlysignificant associated with the Christmas story Joseph and Mary going to Bethlehem and the baby Jesus being born and laid in the manger and ofcourse this is a very rural image of course to us and it certainly was I mean, he was the child out in the barn.

And so there were traditions that were slowly built up that talked aboutcertain herbs that would have been used by Mary and you care for the infantchild and had association with Christmas and they were then used as decoration asalso as symbolism in the home and in the parish church because remember,for centuries the majority of people did not read did not have accessto a Bible and so symbolism was the way that the Catholic Churchreminded people of what they had learned verbally during the Sunday Sermons sothat's why I was just in glass windows and and traditional things such as majorherbs.

Well speaking of major herbs there are alot of our all-time favorites are on the list here you know but there's someunusual ones that people will go gosh I've never heard of that.

Bedstraw is one and this is, you could imagine it being useful in themanger setting.

What kind of herb is this? The full name is Our Lady's Bed Straw.

The tradition was that it was used to create a bed for the baby Jesus.

It is sort of,it is has something of a sweet hay like fragrance and I believe it it's one ofthe herbs that would also be used like pennyroyal which is another one that's amanger herb to help deter fleas and other biting insects you wouldn't wantto have your infant child someplace where it was going to be bitten by fleas.

Makes sense to me.

This was an example of a tradition that came up.

Thyme, sweet garden thyme has and still is actually used some of theessential oils from times as having antiseptic properties right and thatalso to provide a clean environment for the baby Jesus and that was one thatwas also considered a manger herb and lavender as well lavender of course forthe the wonderful scent and the the blue color because blue was a symbolic colorclosely associated with Mary the mother of Jesus which is wellrosemary is also on the list that has a tradition a traditional story thatactually goes beyond Bethlehem.

Not long after Jesus was born to MaryJoseph and the baby fled into Egypt because Herod was looking to kill theinfant child and the tradition says that as they were on their way to Egypt theystopped at some point and for whatever reason and Mary took her cloak which was a bright blue and placed it over a rosemary bush supposedly to air outand the tradition says that before that the flowers were white but after thatthat rosemary would have light blue flowers which not all, but themajority of them still do to this day.

So this was something where ifpeople who grew rosemary and would see the blue flowers would be reminded ofthe Bible story related to Egypt there's so many charming ways that mythologygets blended in with plants.

It is.

And again more offavorites.

Lavender is another one that is associated with a manger again because of the scent.

One that we really don't grow very muchthese days is rue.

It was commonly described as the herb of grace becauseit was considered a cleansing and purifying herb.

Rue was one of I thinkthere's one of two I can't think of the other one one of two herbs that I thinkwould be used to sanctify a person or a place where it would be dipped in holywater and shaken around so it was the herb of grace.

It was dispensing grace to those around and so that has an obviousassociation with the Christ child coming into the world and providing grace tothe work grace and salvation to the world.

Well there's so many cool storiesand we're gonna have to visit with you some more about theother herbs but just real briefly though for a lot of the plants we just talkedabout autumn is a great time to plant them, correct? Yes, autumn isthe perfect time to plant just about any.

Not just your herbs becausethe cooler temperatures mean that the plant is going to be less stressedbecause any time you dig up a plant to disturb its roots it, it's a stressfulsituation it's stressful for us when we change houses it's bad for the plants too.

But it is actually a perfect time to do it because then it also means thatthe plant has the winter for the roots to develop in preparation for spring.

Well, on that note we're gonna have to wrap up this interview but wehope that you'll come back and visit with us some more about some of theseamazing stories that you know so well.

Thank you.

Thanks for being hereand oh and anyone who's interested in the Twelve Herbs of Christmas I have itin a poem form on my website just google, find my website and look up the wordChristmas and you'll find it.

Okay very good.

Thanks and coming up next isStephanie.

Source: Youtube

hi I'm Stephen Orr and today we're goingto be growing herbs one of my favorite group of plants because you can reallyget a lot in a small space from them one of the unusual ways I like to go herbsis in a strawberry pot strawberry pots are designed with these little pocketsso that the strawberries could be planted here and here and as they putdown their little runners you put the new plants in these little pockets andit turns out herbs like to be in these as well I have one I made about sixweeks ago you can see the plants have grown in really nicelyone thing that herbs like about this pot is the excellent drainage you getbecause of all the pockets there's no standing water anywhere so start with astrawberry pot this one's nice and it's very very sweet but it's probably alittle small and also you have to water it a lot so this is a kind of a minimumsize I think and this is a nice size to this larger one first what we'll do isfill the strawberry pot.

this is gonna be really messy, don't be afraid soils goingto go everywhere.

we're using an ordinary potting mix that is well draining andorganic since we're gonna be eating these herbs.

don't over fertilize yourherbs in fact I don't fertilize them at all because the fertilizers make theplants grow too fast and you lose all the essential oils which with herbs arewhat give them flavor.

so as you're filling up your strawberry pot one ofthe things to look for is that you pack it down because all that's reallykeeping the soil in these pockets is the soil itself so just keep pressing downso that the soil kind of goes into the pockets on the outside.

leave a littlespace at the top as with most pots you want to leave an inch or two at the topso that you have plenty of room to water.

now the fun part so you can grow anyalmost any herb you win and grow! one of my favorite plants to grow in these kindof pots is thyme.

so you have this plant you can actually just kind of tug itapart and the plant won't mind just be kind of as careful as you canpulling it into two sections.

that becomes the small plant that can goin a pocket I'm going to start this one at the top then we can add somethingtall like this basil.

then we'll add a sage we could put this sage in a pocketso you want to make a smaller root ball get rid of the extra soil and then putthat right in there.

be careful with the plants but theyactually can take a fair amount of abuse most of them are pretty tough.

basilis a little bit less tough the thyme and oregano and stuff like that is verytough so you can't really harm them too much and you know these are great forkitchen herbs all of these are used for cooking so it's really nice to haveright outside your back door so you can run out when you're you know making anomelet and grab some herbs.

since you're clipping them that keeps them smaller aswell so you don't really have to worry too much about the herbs over growingtheir spot because you're gonna be cutting them all the time.

As you finish planning the last pockets just you know take a look see where youmight need to add some soil back in you can pop some soil in the top.

as youwater you'll notice that the water is flowing out of all the holes so overtime some soil may leech out so it's good to be able to replenish that oncein a while but you know once every few weeks you can pop a little soil back in.

As your plants grow you know some of them get a little large you could alwaysmove them out of the pot but also some of them will start blooming like thesebasil's and you want to be sure you cut these flowers off because flowers signalto the plant to stop making leaves and obviously with basil you want as manyleaves as possible.

so once you're finished just keep this in full sun,water it when it's dry, and what's so nice about that is you have all thesedifferent flavors in such a tiny space.

Source: Youtube

Posted by in growing herbs Tags: , , , , , on Sep 14, 2019

♪ [music] ♪ – [Beverly] Hi, welcome.

I'm BeverlyWelch with The Arbor Gate in Tomball, Texas, here today with AnnWheeler of Log House Herbs.

– [Anne] Hi, Beverly.

– Hello, Anne.

Thanks forjoining us this morning.

So fall on the Gulf coast.

We lookforward to this season every year.

It can be quite short or quite long, butwe never know when it's coming.

One of our favorite things to dois grow in containers.

– Yeah.

– They're so easy to maintain.

They'respace-saving, maintenance-free, just a lot of reasons why containersare a great way to go.

And herbs, of course, are one of our favorite plants.

So Ann, what should we start with this time of year in choosing our container,and what are we going to plant? – Well, those are all good questions andsplendid observations about growing herbs at this time of the year.

Beverly and Idecided a long time ago to call October 1st "New Year's Day" for herbs because,this time of the year, the worst of the heat is over, and it's a great time tostart these things.

They will grow and produce herbs for you throughout what wecall winter, which is really an extended sort of autumn for most folk.

– A lesser summer.

– A lesser summer.

But if we start nowand we choose the right containers and we combine things in an advantageous way,we'll be very, very fortunate to have herbs for a longer period, and we'll beable to maintain those herbs in the same size pot we started them inbecause during the cooler months, they'll grow moreslowly, and herbs are famous for their really bad mannered roots.

Theyare voracious growers, and that's because they're actually weeds.

– But that's why we love them.

– But that's why we love them.

They'rekind of like us.

So here's a thought.

If you choose a pot no smaller thanthis, you can go upwards from that.

You can plant herbs in a pot the size ofthat giant one down there if you want to, and that way, you can manage to grow andprosper with something that starts out in a huge pot like this pineapple sage does.

And it'll bloom, and it'll produce usable leaves throughout the year.

– Wonderful fragrance, though.

The bright,vibrant red salvia type tubular blooms are big attractors for thehummingbirds and butterflies.

– Hummingbirds, butterflies, bees willcome to this plant.

The only limitation here is that the size of the plantprojects the size of the pot that would be needed for it.

It would be notuseful to plant this in this pot.

– This fits for this product.

– It would look pretty from day one,but it wouldn't be long-lasting at all, so we wouldn't want to do that.

Whatwe like to do this time of the year.

and it's an advantage for us this time ofthe year.

Let's take one of our cool season herbs.

We have cilantro, lovage,the parslies, the sages, the dills, and fennels.

All of those things.

Nearlyeverything except basil can be planted this time of year to goodeffect, right, and do well.

So you could takeone of these.

– May I help you? – Yep.

And then we have an Italianparsley that would be very pretty with that and a lovely little.

– calibrachoa million bells, and mostpetunias here on the Gulf coast.

Our winters are so mild, that will bloomall season, really until May of next year.

– And it'll be such a beautiful spotof color and a useful herb, and the whole thing is fragrant.

– Right.

And, you know, many peoplecomplain about having trouble and issues growing cilantro and parsley, dill,and fennel because they wait until spring to plant them.

And, you know, fallis the time to garden on the Gulf coast.

– It really is.

They won't bolt and go toseed as fast as they would planted in March or April when they first come out inthe nurseries.

That's when everyone's excited about planting and we want to,but that is a shorter growing season for this plant.

So that's one thought.

Now, what I would do.

Let's say these were my choices, and I would dothis, and I would do it right now today, and they would be planted in Arbor GateSoil fertilized with Arbor Gate Blend, and these would be my fallbackthings if I had any problems I wanted to solve, and I'll say a word about whyin just a minute.

But when spring comes.

Let's say mid to late May.

Thispot might look better if this were taken completely out of it and give thespace to these to continue to grow, bloom, and produce the seeds they'regoing to produce.

So any questions, ma'am? – Not so far.

Not so far.

– It makes a lot of sense, doesn't it? Ifyou're growing things in the cooler season, their roots justwon't expand as quickly.

They're still going to grow.

They're still going to produce.

– Plenty of cilantro and parsley tolast you all season long.

– And you'll be very gladthat you have them nearby.

– So what were some of theother things that you chose? – Well, this is curled parsley forprettiness, and this is Italian parsley for flavor, and then I chosea dill.

This is a bouquet dill, and it's noted for being a littlebit shorter in height, but very bushy and dense.

Lots of dill for you there.

– And, you know, the fragrance on theseplants.

I love the fragrance.

But in the springtime, what you'll findwith your dill and fennel is they're larval food forthe swallowtails.

– Absolutely.

Never forget thatif you have herbs out there, you're going to have butterflies, bees,some even hummingbirds.

Let's see.

I wanted to point outthat lavenders, also.

It's very beneficial to plantlavenders in the cooler seasons.

Our summers are just really hard onthem.

So if you plant them in a nice pot this size and put them somewhere where,in the worst of the summer heat, you can give them some shade in theafternoon.

One of the great benefits of having them in a pot.

You canmove them around and give them a little shelterfrom that terrible sun.

– You know, and given the volume of rainthat we're apt to get from time to time, it's a great way to grow lavender here.

It's keeping it up out of the ground where it's got good drainageand good air flow.

– My thought with regard to growing herbsin containers.

Either you can have a decorative objective or you canhave a gardening objective.

Either or.

Now, this and another plant in thispot would be the decorative approach that you might take right now.

– Right.

Maybe this beautiful Lobularia.

– That gorgeous little plant.

It'll drapeover the edge, and it'll be beautiful throughout the.

– Actually, almost year-round.

It's across between alyssum and Lobelia, so it's a very sturdy alyssum-lookingplant with that wonderful fragrance.

– And it's so delicate and a great foilfor these lavenders who are very sturdy-looking plants.

So towardsthe end of the cooler months, I might be inclined to take that one out,and I might even be inclined to divide these two and let one of theselavenders dominate the pot.

– Perfect.

– So you don't always haveto have a great big pot to have a beautifully full plant in it.

Andas Beverly and I have talked about many times, when worse comes to worse,you can cut many of these things off.

I have one here just for that purpose.

This is Mexican mint marigold.

This is a plant that will be blooming inthe fall, and it's most gorgeous.

It'll be really nice most of the winter.

It'll go dormant, it'll come back, and it'll grow, grow, grow.

If it getstoo big and ratty-looking, you can cut it right down,and it'll refill the pot.

– Instantly.

-.

Almost before your eyes.

– And, you know, this is our tarragonsubstitute on the Gulf coast.

Tarragon itself is so hard to grow,but this guy is a champ.

– It's a champ, and it's a beautifulplant for a container.

It truly is.

Also, another beauty in a containeris this [inaudible] sage.

I find that this is one of the mostforgiving sages of all, and it can easily be kept in-bounds, and little bad-lookingbits can be easily clipped off wherever there's a branch.

And that brings me tosomething else, which is true of all herbs whether they're in the pot or theground.

They really do need to be groomed and made and used.

Using is thebest way to groom them, isn't it? – Yes.

– But you don't need to see a stragglyherb.

You just keep it shaped up the way you want it year-round.

– And so all I need for thisproject then is pick my pot.

We didn't talk about this, but the BetterThan Rocks gives us really excellent drainage, doesn't let the soil blockthe hole, kind of filters the water, if you will.

It's reusable.

– Yes.

You can wash theseout and reuse them.

– And then the good draining soil, ArborGate Soil Complete, gives you an organic, well-draining soil.

– Filled with amendments,micorrhizals, spores, and so forth.

– Exactly.

– I plant everything with a goodly handfulof Arbor Gate Blend mixed into the soil.

Throughout the growing season, I alsosprinkle it on top, and I take a fork and just rake it in a little bit.

When I seethings that look not as healthy as I'd like for them to, I use fish emulsionand/or Hasta Gro.

This is more of a.

– Just a little boost.

You know, whenyou feed with a liquid fertilizer, it's a faster-acting.

– It's available to the plant throughthe roots right straight away.

– And this can be used asa foliar feed as well.

– Yes, it can.

And this has even beenrecommended to me to solve problems where you know there's some sort ofnutrition problem, but you don't know exactly what it is.

Fish emulsion is just,like, the greatest vitamin in the world.

– And really, the only control, other thanthat, for fungal or insect pests is Neem, which is going to be more organic.

Here onthe Gulf coast, we have to be a little mindful of temperatures.

This can be alittle temperature-sensitive in the heat of the summer, but for the fall andwinter, as we're discussing, this can be used anytime.

– And in the greenhouse, we found thissolved the problems of powdery mildew, which sometimes will, you know.

– We get a little humid.

– A little humid, and it gets on theunderside of the leaves of the sages sometimes, but this is a verygood way to take care of that.

– So a minimal amount of products,but a great selection of plants, and an endless selection of containers.

– Absolutely.

– Well, thank you, Anne.

– It was my pleasure.

♪ [music] ♪.

Source: Youtube

welcome to healing house.

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here are 5 such Vegetables and Herbs You CanRegrow Again and Again in your garden.

Do you throw your garlic-bulbs out once theystart to sprout? What about your potatoes when they get a littlewrinkly? How about ginger-root that sits out on thecounter too long? Well, you could be getting a lot more valueout of your produce than you may realize! Many popular edibles can be regrown from thescraps you're likely throwing-out.

Keep watching for a list of veggie scrapsyou will want to hang on to, from here on out.

1.

BasilBasil is a breeze to propagate.

Simply take some healthy, fresh, 4-inch cuttingsfrom a young basil plant.

Leave just two sets of leaves at the top ofeach cutting, and remove the remaining leaves.

Then, submerge the cuttings in a few inchesof clean-water.

It may take between 1-2 weeks for roots toform after which Plant it in a small-pot for the windowsill,or out in your garden.

2.

MintAnother herb worth growing from cuttings is mint.

Much like basil, you'll want cuttings about4 to 5 inches in length.

Remove lower leaves and place the cuttingsin clean-water.

Once roots develop, Transfer to a containerfilled with potting-soil.

3.

Green Onions and ScallionsDo you love to toss some green-onions on just about everything? Buy them once, and then grow them from thescraps on a windowsill.

Place the root leftover from the green-onionsin a couple of inches of water.

And in just a few days you'll notice rootsform but also the leaves will start to grow.

Continue to harvest while in water, or plantin a container of potting-soil.

4.

Ginger RootHave you ever bought ginger-root and noticed little buds forming? Plant it! You'll have fresh ginger to harvest soon enough! Soak the roots overnight to encourage growth,and then you can transfer it to a container filled with potting-soil.

Ginger doesn't like standing-water, so makesure your container has drainage-holes.

​5.

Garlic If your garlic-cloves start to sprout, plantthem! Garlic is one of the easiest plants to growover and over again.

One clove planted in the garden, in eitherearly-fall or late winter depending on your area, can multiply into a bulb of multiple-cloves.

Source: Youtube

Posted by in growing herbs Tags: , , , , , , , , , , on Sep 13, 2019

Herbs make anymeal taste better, especially when they're pickedfresh from your own garden.

I'll show you how to plantand care for a herb garden, so you'll have a goodsupply for the kitchen.

Herbs can be planted atany time of the year.

but some are seasonal, socheck the tag before you plant.

You can plant straightinto garden beds or in pots inside and out.

Plant somewherewith lots of light and in a place thatdoesn't get too wet.

Good drainage isreally important, too.

Also think about locatingthem in a handy place close to your kitchen.

There are two types of herbs— annuals like parsley,basil, and coriander need to be replanted each year.

Perennials likethyme and rosemary can live for morethan two years.

And one plant of eachherb type is generally enough for your garden.

That will give you spacefor more variety, too.

Herbs don't do well in soilthat's overly rich or dense, so grab some of this herbmix, which is nice and coarse, and work it throughyour existing soil.

We've laid out all of our herbs.

Put them roughly 30 to50 centimeters apart to give them a littlebit of room for growth.

We've put things like thymeand rosemary on the edges because they do take upa little bit more room.

Thyme can also crawlover the sides, so you're alsooptimizing on that space, not overcrowding themiddle of the garden.

And a handy tip ifyou're growing mint– plant it in a separatepot, as it tends to run and take over a bed.

Next, dig your holes.

Now, it's a good idea, beforeplanting any herb into a bed, to soak it in a seaweed tonic.

This just helps reduce thestress from the transplant into the ground.

And just gently take it out,pop it in the hole, backfill, and then gently press down.

And finally, watering.

Herbs also make greatcompanion plants, which means that when plantedalongside certain other plants, they help deter insects, attractpollinators, and can even improve the flavor ofthe neighboring plant.

For example, basil is greatplanted next to tomatoes.

There's a detailed list of someof these effective combinations on our web site.

Water your herbs regularly,and if they're in pots, make sure they don't dry out.

Feed every couple of weekswith some veggie and herb liquid plant food.

It has the right NPKratio for herbs plants with an extra dose ofnitrogen in for their foliage.

Adding a layer of mulch willhelp keep the roots moist and keep the bed weed free.

Herbs aren't generallyaffected by pests and diseases.

But if you've got yoursindoors, then lack of sunlight and airflow canreduce plant productivity and attract insectslike white fly.

If you spot anything you'renot sure of, just take a photo and bring it in store,and we'll sort you out with the right product.

So when harvestingyour herbs, there's a few different ways to do it.

With thyme, try andwork from the outside in because it's a bit ofa twiggier kind of herb.

With more leafyherbs, like parsley, harvest the whole leaf.

And with chives,it's a good idea to harvest them roughly twocentimeters from the base.

And then with somethinglike rosemary, that tends to form asort of a woodier shrub, it's a good idea to keepit more compact so you'll get more new growth at the top.

Harvest these shoots becausethey've got the best flavor.

With the annual herbs, likebasil, parsley, and coriander, pick flowers as soon asyou see them to stop them from going to seed.

If they do, the flavortends to change, and they can become bitter.

And that's how to create yourvery own herb garden, easy as.

Now, it's time to digout the cookbooks.

Source: Youtube

Hi I'm Shawna CoronadoWelcome to Easy as 123 Gardening Tips Today we are going to talk aboutbolting It happens in every gardenYou have these beautiful herbs like this oregano hereand it develops a flower on the topBolting is when your plant sets flower Your leafy vegetableyour herb like this oreganoor maybe your dill and when the plantsset flower what happens isthey are developing their seeds all the productiongoes into seed production and then youlose the leaf you do not get as muchleaf we want more leafand to get that what you need to do is go in and trim the plant downwow this smells delicious and this is the simply herb dillwonderful now you can use this in a flowerarrangement or toss it away and put it in your composterwhen you cut off all these extra flowers it enables more leaf to grownow another way to prevent bolting is to mulch your plantsyou want to keep your roots cool so those are my two favoritetips for preventing the bolting process ultimately all your plants are goingto want to bolt if you want to let them boltwhat happens is they can become pollinating plantsand right here we have a lovely oregano you can seethe adorable little pink flower it can look quite beautiful in the gardenand it also attracts bees soyour herb garden can be good to eat and it can be goodfor the pollinators thanks for joining me foreasy as 123 gardening tips come back next time for morefun ideas sponsored by wave petunias.

Source: Youtube

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