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[Music] In times gone by, saving seed was the main way growersobtained plants for the next season – keeping what they needed for thefollowing year, and swapping the rest.

These days, seed is cheaply and widely availablefrom many suppliers, but there are still good reasons to saveyour own.

It's the best way to perpetuate rare heritage or heirloom varieties which havebeen passed down through generations.

Preserving the seed ensures they are there for the future, and helps maintain genetic diversity.

Varieties can subtly evolve over time to become better suited to your unique local growing conditions.

It's natural selection in action, andwhile you may not have unique strain after 1 or 2 years, locally saved seed can over a few decadesbecoming a unique variety.

It can be very rewarding to learn howto successfully grow plants through to maturity, harvest and store the seed, and then useit to grow them again in subsequent years.

Finally, saving seed can save you money.

Many crops produce lots of viable seed which just takes your time to collect, clean, dry and store.

Some vegetables produce seeds more easilythan others and are more likely to produce goodyields.

Plants which are easy to collect seed from include beans, peas, tomatoes, peppers and chilies.

Seeds from biennial crops that take 2 seasons to produce seeds, such as carrots, onions or beetroot, are harder to save because you need tokeep the plants in optimum condition for 2 years.

However, leaving some in the ground toflower the following year can be a successful early source of pollen forbeneficial insects as well as helping you to save seed.

Other plants, such as squash and melons, readily pollinate with other types grown in the area and won't always produce reliable saved seed unless you take measures to prevent insect pollination, and pollinate by hand, so most homegardeners don't bother saving these seeds.

It's also not worth saving seeds fromplants which are grown from F1 hybrid seeds.

F1 hybrid varieties are commerciallyproduced seeds that combine certain traits of 2 parent plants,such as resistance to disease, pests or bolting, or a tendency to produce heavy yields.

For example, carrot 'Resistafly' andmany common sweet corn varieties are F1 hybrids.

Some saved seed from F1 varieties will beinfertile, and some will produce different traitsfrom the original parents that are less favorable to the ones which you originallybought.

Check the seed packet for an F1 mark ifyou're unsure.

For many plants, the seed is ready forcollection when a few start to drop into the soil – nature's way of indicating that the seedis mature.

For other plants you may need to experiment to find the best time, for example with fruiting plants, thecorrect time to collect seed from their fruits may be a little later than the timethey're ready to eat.

Remember to only save seed from the most vigorous plants with the best fruit and avoid using seed from weak or unusuallooking plants – in this way, you'll be naturally selectingthe traits you wish to encourage in your crops.

You might sacrifice a little from yourharvest but you'll gain in interest throughout the fall and winter in seeingflowers and seed pods develop From the healthiest plants, collect a fewripe fruits, free of cracks or bug holes which can serve as entry points fordisease and microorganisms.

Wash the fruits well, then slice outthe middle portions from each one which is where the biggest, fattest seeds are found.

Put the middle portions into a jar and add some water to cover.

Put on the lid and store in a warm placefor 2-3 days – a windowsill in a sunny position will do – giving it to shake a few times a day to loosen the mixture.

This will cause the gelatinous sacaround the tomato seed to break down through a fermentation process.

The sac part contains chemicals whichprevent germination.

Pour the liquid through a kitchen sieveand rinse with cold water.

The fleshy part of the tomato, includingthe sac, should come away from the seed, leaving you with seeds in the sieve.

Repeat this a few times if necessary.

Dry the seeds by putting them on a finemesh, or something like a paper plate.

if you put them onto paper towels theytend to stick quite firmly, so it's best to create ready-madeplanting discs, which can be sown direct into pots next year.

Cut circles of paper towel and place a couple of seeds per disc to use when you're planting them out.

After a week in a dry place, the seeds should be dry enough to store.

Put them in an envelope and be sure tolabel them with the date and variety.

The tomato method also works well forother seeds extracted from fruits.

For other seeds, using coarse sieves can helpseparate the seed from the surrounding plant material.

Whatever method you use, it's importantthat all seeds are dried out thoroughly before storage and then kept in airtight containers whichare mice and pest-proof, in a cool dark place.

Prepared correctly from good healthyplants, your seeds should remain viable easily into the next growing season, andin some cases for several years.

Once you've kept the seeds you need, why not offer surplus at a local seed swap event or to friends and family.

With any luck you'll be rewarded withequally cared-for seeds which will grow into great plants – starting the whole process again.

[Music].

Source: Youtube

Humble Request :- Please listen full massage of video to understand our main motive of this channel.

Source: Youtube

Posted by in seed saving Tags: , , , , on Sep 14, 2019

Why do we need to save seeds? There are a lot of seeds in the market now.

Why do we need to worry about food, when there's a lot of food in the market now? So many people keep asking me about that.

Why do you have to save seeds? But actually there's a lot of food in the market, there're a lot of seeds in the market but there're something behind the seeds The most of people don't think about it.

Most of people don't know about it.

Because we were disconnected from farmer and consumer We don't know what do they grow, we just eat whatever look nice.

And the farmer, they don't think about they grow for somebody to eat.

They just think about that they grow for sell.

That's all.

So when these two groups don't know each other there's something happen in the middle.

I grew up as a farmer so I see somethinghappens in my farmer life.

The first thing that I see is when I was kid my family or people in my village used to growmore than five varieties of rice every year.

So I just asked my mother why we need to grow five varieties of rice and at the end we just mix everything together to eat.

My mother said we have to save varieties of rice, because different kind of rice, they have different quality, different character Some kind of rice, they survive in dry season.

When there's no rain for many months, they can survive.

Some kind of rice, they survive in flooding.

When they have a big flood,they can extend itself for one meter in 1 or 2 nights Some varieties, they can survive even they have disease, they have some epidemic so when they grow more than five varieties of rice, whatever happens they'll still have food, have rice to eat That means security of life But now people grow only 1 or 2 varieties for sell.

So whatever happens, they'll lost, they don't have anything.

That means life have no security.

When I was kid, nobody sells seeds Seed is something you can give topeople, you can share with people, you can change with people, with something else but when I was about twelve or thirteen-years-old there's a company came and then they started to give hybrid seed hybrid watermelon seed topeople in my village because people in my village used to grow watermelon for many years and then they're very famous about that When the company came, they gave hybrid seed along with the chemical fertilizer So when people start to grow hybrid seed, they love it because they grow very fast and have a lot of fruit and then all thefruit look the same size and then taste good Next year villager want to grow that seed again but they need to buy it And then after three years, they all grow hybrid seed the local watermelon seed disappear So.

after that everybody need to buy seed You have no choice Because there's no local seed left in that area and in many places around it.

And the price of seed rised up very fast At the beginning, it's only maybe less than 100 baht per kilo But after four, five years later the price goes up to 1000 baht per kilo And at the end, now the price of watermelon seed goes up to 12 thousand baht per kilo It does not happen with watermelon seed only It happens with all kind of vegetable all kind of seed that we grow for eat So that thing.

I feel like.

it's not normal Why do we need to buy seeds so expensive like that? Why does the seed have to be very expensive like that? So the price of the watermelon seed in the village now is about 10.

000 baht per kilo or 300 dollars per kilo And the farmer in a village, they have average income about 30.

000 baht or 900 dollars per year So if one farmer who want to grow watermelon about 9 acres they need to invest at least 100.

000 baht So when they start to think about it They need to think about where to get money.

That's the beginning of debt in farmer life Because now sixty percent of money that farmers invest will go to the company.

So if one family who wants to grow 9 acres of watermelon so they need to be in debt for sure Because they have 30.

000 baht or 900 dollars per year but they need 100.

000 to invest That means they need to be in debt So this is the big problem in everywhere We can see it quite clear that the seed business and the chemical business involved with debt of villager Clearly.

Now.

Everywhere Now the whole village People will be in debt 100% now and most of themthey don't know how to pay debt in their life What happens now in everywhere in Thailand or maybe in other countries All the farmers turn to be a slave in their land They use debt as a chain to tie all the farmer very tight, push them to work very hard Farmer need to get up early and work until dark everyday just work to make money and send moneyto the company and then don't have anything to eat Farmers, who grow food, but have no food to eat Farmers, who work hard, but have very bad life How can that happen? So Seed was used as a tool to trap farmer into debt system and turn farmer into slave And then no where they can get out of this system Now everybody turns to slave completely So that's the most scary part of it Because now, they work harder than normal slave nobody works 8 hours per day in the past even slave, they've never worked 8 hours per day Slave, they worked in season They had only seasons to work 2 seasons to work: planting season and harvest season and the rest is free time But now we work all year long work for nothing So our life is worse than any life in the history Debt make me feel like a.

It's wrong.

Why do we need to develop our life in this way? So.

Seed or food is a tool to turn people into slave if you don't think clearly if we don't have seed we have nofreedom If we don't save seed we cannot be happy Our ancestors select the best for us what kind of plant that they go well last long, give a lot of fruit and taste good They save those things And then it turned to the life heritage for all of us now Now we have a lot of food to enjoy That's the benefit of our ancestor that give to us But now We don't save seed.

We let a few company save seed for us But they did not select seed as our ancestor just doing before They select the worse one and then they develop our seed to make them weaker They cannot stay long They cannot rely on themself They need to rely on chemical and food from the factory So the taste is bad We don't have a good quality of food anymore So what happened now is We have no heritage to keep to our next generation anymore So this food can be the last food, the last meal for our ancestor, our era Because we ruin everything.

We ruin our food.

That means we ruin our life, we ruin our next generation We have nothing That's why if you like, we need to save seeds now Because seed is life.

Seed is our nextgeneration Seed is freedom.

Seed is happiness.

If you have no seed, you have nothing.

You are the good slave.

Good slave for a few company, and then that's the end What we can do now is We come back to the farm We come back to this place that we call Pun Pun.

We started 7 years ago.

So we start to grow our own food here We start to save seeds collect seeds from the best and grow them here And then we can enjoy our life.

We save seed and networking with another groups, and then.

try to share seed together.

We try to keep the seed alive We don't want the seed to end now We just work well and then more and more people're interested about seed We can give seeds to people, a lot every year We give free seed When they sell seed very expensive, we give it for free.

We always give seed.

Food is life.

We cannot sell life.

We try to give life to people.

And now we feel like.

we start a small heaven here We start to work on it.

We want to turn it into a heaven.

Heaven means we have a lot of food.

We have a lot of people who come to live together and enjoy living together.

And we hope that, one day we have enough seed, enough food for our next generation And now we see that, that thing is not too far away from us.

We can do.

Source: Youtube

Posted by in seed saving Tags: , , , , on Sep 14, 2019

– Today I wanted totalk about seed saving, specifically how to save seeds from the brasaica or brassica family.

And specifically kale, right there.

– [Camera Woman] What'sthe brassica family? – Broccoli, kale, cabbages.

This stuff, you already knowthat this is super healthy.

It's like a super green food for you.

What you maybe didn't knowis that you can save the seed from your kale for the next year, which is pretty cool.

The trick here is that kale will seed on its second year.

What you wanna do is, first of all, you wanna get your kale through the winter and you can do this a couple ways.

Ours, sometimes the snow is enough of of a insulating blanketthat it just kinda stays a little bit green andthen when the snow melts, it grows again.

– [Camera Woman] Really? – Or you can put it under, you can put a hoop houseon top of your kale.

We have a couple of hoop house videos.

A couple of really neat designs that work really well for that.

On your second year, the kale flowers, and this is kind ofreally late in the year for a flower but I wanted to show you.

But you'll get a really long stem of yellow flowers which abunch of different bees like.

And then the flowers are pollinated and then you get thesegreen seed pods here.

Which kinda look like string beans that are goin' straight out.

– [Camera Woman] Yeah they do.

– Like this, okay? Leave those on the plant and let them dry.

– [Camera Woman] Youmean let them go brown? – Yep, and here's what happens.

So these are the driedzucchini, not zucchini, kale seed pods.

(squeaking) So lemme show you what's in the seed pod.

There are little seeds.

You can take this and justkind of rub it with your hand and see how the seeds justcome right out like that.

Those are kale seeds, pretty cool huh? There we go, I just seeded the garden.

– [Camera Woman] You don'tneed a video for that.

– No.

Another way to harvest allthis is to take these long, just these whole stems of these, put 'em in a big paper bagand shake the paper bag and then you've kinda de-seededthese little pods here and you'll have little black kale seeds in the bottom of the bag.

– [Camera Woman] The pods'llopen up by themselves? – Yeah, well, just by mechanical action.

When you're banging aroundthe sides of a paper bag.

– [Camera Woman] We wanna see that.

– And they'll open up.

This is lettuce, looks like our red sales or red leaf lettuce that has bolted.

It's a little late in the year to go to seed but this is the precursor to collecting seeds from your lettuce.

Very similar to kale or things like that.

Again, it'll flower, and thenit'll have a little seed pod, let the seed pods go brown.

They usually go brown.

Like this, and then you can collect them.

All right, there ya go.

If you like what you're seeing here, will you hit the subscribe button.

We post new shows every weekand it's free to subscribe.

If you have any questions or comments, leave 'em below there.

If you know anythingmore about salad greens and why kale alwaysflowers in the second year, maybe 'cause it's a biannual.

You know, consider that.

Smart, huh? Right, there's morecool stuff on our site.

There's a bunch more seedsaving and gardening videos.

There's a link below andat the end of the show.

(upbeat music).

Source: Youtube

Posted by in seed saving Tags: , , , , , , , , on Sep 14, 2019

how to grow beet seed part 1 greetingsmy name is Hank and I have not paid for seed at the store for almost 10 yearsbecause I grow my own it's April 3rd 2016 springtime here in zone 5 in NorthAmerica and it's time to check the cellar for last year's beets so that Ican replant them and grow seed I would have just left the beets in the groundfrom the previous summer had I been in a warmer climate but herein zone 5 the winter has a chance of reaching nighttime temperatures of 20degrees below zero Fahrenheit or even lowerthis turns beets to mush so to be safe I store them in a cellar you don't have tohave a cellar I have stored beets in a simple hole here in the ground dug witha shovel the hole just needs to be more than three feet deep and covered here inzone 5 anything less than three feet deep usually dies even in my cellar solast year I kept my beets in the same bag as the carrots I grew and looks likethey did well together don't be tempted to grow seed with beets from the storethose are hybrid beets and would not likely produce good seed all of my beets are from heirloom seedsand are open pollinated a person should use at least 12 beets for openpollination anything fewer than 12 could lead to inbreeding and have poor resultsso the more the better I kept my beets in a bird feed bag and folded the topclosed to regulate moisture but most any animal feed bag works fine for this if Ileave my beets exposed in the cellar they get dry through the winter and someof them die so to get started I usually hoe a small trench for the beets waterthe trench to soften the ground and plunge the beets into the wet soil rootdown since beets are wind pollinated you should plant them in two or more rowsnext to each other to increase pollination no matter which way the windblows then I cover the beets with dirt and water them well if your soil hasgood drainage then you should water them every daythis has been part 1 of how to grow beet seed please stay tuned for part 2 I willpost a link to that video in the info section of this video once it hasfinished thanks for watching and happy gardening.

Source: Youtube

Posted by in seed saving Tags: , , , , , , , , on Sep 14, 2019

how to grow cabbage seed part 1greetings my name is Hank and I have not paid for seed at thestore for almost 10 years because I grow my ownit's April 3rd 2016 springtime here in zone 5 in North America and it's time tocheck the cellar for last year's cabbage so that I can replant them and grow seedI would have just left the cabbage in the ground from the previous summerhad I been in a warmer climate but here in zone 5 the winter has a chance ofreaching nighttime temperatures of 20 degrees below zero Fahrenheit or evenlower this turns cabbage to mush so to be safeI store them in a cellar you don't have to have a cellar I have stored cabbagein a simple hole here in the ground dug with a shovel the hole just needs to bemore than three feet deep and covered here in zone 5 anything less than 3 feetdeep usually dies even in my cellar the cabbage looks a little worse forwear but otherwise ready to grow don't be tempted to grow seed with cabbagefrom the store those are hybrid cabbage and would not likely produce good seedall of my cabbage are from heirloom seeds and are open pollinated a personshould use at least 12 heads of cabbage for open pollination anything fewer than12 could lead to inbreeding and have poor results so the more themerrier so to get started I usually hoe a small trench for the cabbage water thetrench to soften the ground and lay the cabbage down in the wet soil then Icover the roots of the cabbage with dirt and water them if your soil has gooddrainage then you should water them every day onetip I use when growing cabbage for seed is to cut a deep X in the top of thehead this helps the leaves open up and spread and gives the cabbage a headstart on seed production since the cabbage leaves are usually wrapped sotightly that they have trouble opening up on their own after a few days outsidethe cabbage began to get some color to them the leaves turn greener and thehead slowly opens up eventually forming a green bud in the center a bud thatwill become a towering spire of stems and leaves this has been part one of howto grow cabbage seed please stay tuned for part two I will post a link to thatvideo in the info section of this video once it has finished thanks for watchingand happy gardening.

Source: Youtube

Posted by in seed saving Tags: , , , , , , , , on Sep 13, 2019

how to grow cabbage seed part 2 welcome back in part one I planted last year's full heads ofcabbage in the ground and they started growing right away making tall stemscovered with leaves and flower buds i watered my cabbage every day and insix weeks they started to bloom week after week they continued to growmore stems and more blooms until there were hundreds of blooms attracting avariety of insects including these honeybees the impressive bouquet of flowers becamefruit which looks a little bit like green beans and after 10 weeks the fruit was so heavy that the stemsbegan falling all over the place this happens every year and i have foundthat looping a rope around each plant helps to hold them up keeping your seedpods out of the mud and in their own row it takes quite a few weeks for the seedpods to mature but once the pods are dried you may remove them from the plantthe dried pods should contain a number of seeds as long as your plants had asuccessful pollination this has been how to grow cabbage seedpart 2 thanks for watching see you next time yeah yeah.

Source: Youtube

Every winter, I get itchy to start planting seeds, because I want to get my garden growing – even though the snow is outside, or it's cold weather.

So in today's video I'm going to walk you through exactly what to do to start seeds indoors so that you will have a fantastic garden that's ready to go as early as possible in the season.

So stick with me to the end of this video and you'll see exactly what it is you need to do to be successful with growing seeds indoors.

Now, first of all, the question is "why would you want to do this?" Well, mostly, you would start seeds indoors for plants that like warmer weather.

So particularly things like tomatoes and peppers, which love warm weather, and they're not going to germinate until the ground has gotten to a certain temperature.

So if you plant them directly outside it's gonna be really late in the season before you get anything growing on those plants.

In fact, you might not even get tomatoes or peppers depending on where you're living.

So you're gonna want to start those in advance Other plants, like Lettuce and spinach and peas and beans and corn and things – those are going to go straight into the garden you don't need to start them indoors.

But there are a lot of other vegetables and flowers and some herbs that you want to start inside.

In the notes underneath this video we have for you a download showing you when to start what.

Which plants should be started inside, which ones can you put directly into the garden.

And usually the date at which you decide to plant your seedlings indoors or outdoors has to do with the expected last frost date in your area.

It's going to be different for everybody so again underneath this video right down there, we have a link for you that allows you to find when the last frost is expected in your part of the country.

So that's going to determine when you plant different types of seeds So what do you need to grow seeds indoors? Well, it's pretty simple.

You only need a few things.

You need something to plant your seeds in, you need some kind of seed starting mix, you need water, and you need heat.

That's pretty much it.

So let's start with the seed starting mix – what are you going to plant this in? Now there are a lot of different types of seed starting mixes out there.

We actually tested a ton of them and, again, down there is a link to our review of over a dozen different types of seed starting mixes and the one that I really like best is this one from Coast of Maine organic seed starter but there are lots of other good ones out there as well.

A few things to keep in mind: First, never use garden soil.

We tried that as well you know people are always saying, "yeah, sure, you can try it!" It's got all sorts of insects and pathogens in it that especially you're starting your seeds indoors, you don't want to bring that inside.

It's also less likely that your seeds are going to germinate in that mix, so just don't do it.

Potting mix similarly It can work but it's not going to be as optimal of a growing environment for your seedlings as a seed starting mix – one that's specifically built for it.

So this is the one we're going to use today.

A few things to keep in mind: First of all, when it comes out of the bag, it's dry – it's really dry, and you need to moisten it.

So what I do is I put the seed starting mix into a large trug So you can see here – you can put it into anything but you're gonna want to add moisture to it – water – and it's probably gonna take a lot more water than you think it is to make it nice and moist.

If you're only planting a few seeds obviously you don't need something as big as this; a bowl will do, but make sure you're not just using it straight out of out of the bag.

Now people do do that – they put this into the seed trays and then they water it.

The problem with that is it doesn't absorb moisture very easily when it's dry, so if you're just going to water it on top you'll get parts of your mix that are wet and part of it that is dry and that will never work properly.

Your seedlings won't grow very well so always moisten the soil first.

Make sure when you do that that it isn't too wet, so when you squeeze it, you don't want water to come dripping out.

If it does, it's too wet.

Add some more dry mix.

And when you bounce it in your hand it should fall apart If it doesn't hold together at all, it's too dry.

So that's kind of the test is it too wet or is it too dry you want to just right.

It holds together a little bit, it doesn't squeeze water out, and when you bounce it it falls apart.

You've got your seat starting mix nice and moist and ready to go, what are you gonna put it in? So this is something that you've probably seen; you can get these in every hardware store, big box, garden center or any of those things, and it is a very simple system.

You've got a tray a waterproof tray so that keeps things the water in there Then you have a bunch of these plastic cells these plastic trays.

They're pretty flimsy, they've got holes in the bottom and they fit in there.

And then you have a greenhouse cover that goes on top.

That's important because it's gonna keep the moisture in So while seeds are germinating, you want them to be in a nice moist – not wet – but moist environment and the easiest way to do that is to cover it with something like this.

You could also use a plastic bag, you can use Saran wrap, you can use pretty much anything you can find that's gonna keep the moisture in, but nice and easy this way.

Now this is what a lot of people use, and there's nothing really wrong with it unless you're a pretty lazy gardener like me.

I tend to forget to water things which means that these dry out on me.

You're gonna put the water underneath, you're gonna put these in there and, I find, I come and my seedlings are all wilting because I forgot to water it.

So, I like a all-in-one self watering system.

So this is one of my favorite ones.

It's got the same components, generally speaking.

Here is the seed tray.

Now this one is from Gardener's Supply.

It's their Deep Root Seed Starting tray, or as part of a kit you can get it as well.

I like it because these cells are bigger, right? You can see the difference in size.

What that means is that, as the seedlings develop in here, I don't need to transplant them into a larger pot.

So when you start them in something like this, you're probably going to transplant them into something bigger like this to grow on before you then put them into the garden.

If you put them directly from here, either they won't have enough roots and they'll be too small and they'll just get flattened or blown over or die in your garden, or you've left them in here too long the roots have all wrapped around and they're also going to be less likely to survive when you plant them out.

So starting in this, you probably do want to transplant up into something bigger.

That's why I like this.

It's larger; I don't have to transplant.

This also comes with a watering tray You can see, I use that quite a lot.

I really need to wash it before i use it again.

You want to use clean seed starting equipment right? Partially, you don't want any bacteria, fungus anything from last year or since then to infect your seeds as you're growing them, so i gotta clean this.

One thing I like about this, it's dishwasher safe so I could just rinse it stick it in the top of my dishwasher as well as this, and that will essentially sterilize them.

Otherwise what you're probably going to do is you're going to use a water and bleach solution – ten percent bleach – to wash all of your seed starting trays before you use them again.

So this, I could do that, right, and water it that way.

What I like with this system though is that it has this sort of platform or tray that goes in there just like that and this sits on top so the bottom of these containers are not sitting directly in water.

So then the question is, "how does the water get from down here into the seedlings?" and that's where this comes in.

This is the capillary mat.

It's a piece of special fabric and you lay it in here on top and you make sure that one end of it is hanging over and it's sitting in the water in the tray underneath.

And what that's going to do is it's going to wick the water from underneath up across the entire surface of this capillary mat so this is going, to be wet.

You now put that on top and the moist seed starting mix that's in these cells is then going to wick water from the capillary mat up into your seedlings.

So it's a really nice system you can't overwater this way.

The problem with with these is the bottom is sitting in water.

You know, I've over-watered them many many times, and then you get all sorts of problems with fungus gnats and molds and all sorts of dead seedlings, which you don't want.

This kind of a system prevents that from happening.

So i really like that.

It also has a greenhouse cover.

Then I have some other systems as well.

This is one I've had, it's a very similar type of self watering system.

I've had this one for about 15 years I think.

I got it from Lee Valley and it's the same sort of idea.

So you have your water reservoir in the bottom, and then you have your table, your platform with your capillary mat.

This one is structured a little different, it hangs off the sides it sits in there.

This is what you plant your seeds in, and then it has a greenhouse cover.

There are a couple of extra features on this system that I really like, and one is this right here So this allows you to see how much water is in the tray underneath.

This little indicator.

Inside is a little float.

As you fill the tray with water, the red thing moves up and you can see when it's time to water.

Which is great because then you're not gonna run out of water in here.

The other thing I like and you can't see it so well with that, is that there are openings on both ends here to fill the tray with water.

So it makes it much easier to water it.

You don't have to pick the whole thing up to fill it with water.

The final thing I really like about this, is when you are ready to transplant your seedlings – they've grown and you're gonna transplant them – instead of having to poke them all out from the bottom, you simply turn this upside down, do that, and it will push your soil blocks right out of here.

You just grab them and plant them.

Perfect! Nice and easy.

This is this is one system that I really like.

Now there are lots of other similar sorts of systems out there.

One that I've had for a long time is something a little bigger.

This is called the Bio Dome.

this is from Park Seed.

You can see I have it labeled with all sorts of things I've been planting.

It's got vents on top so you can control the amount of air circulation and moisture inside this, and you can put any seed trays you want inside this bottom reservoir here.

Now these are all systems that you buy.

They range from this this jiffy 72 cell pack was about eight bucks to twenty five, thirty, forty dollars for a system like this.

But you don't need to spend that kind of money, so if money is the issue absolutely don't bother with this, You can do this yourself.

You don't need anything fancy.

One thing I do recommend is that you have some sort of water proof tray to put underneath all your seed starting stuff.

This is a boot tray.

This isn't even specifically for seed starting and when you have this, all of your seed starting kits can fit inside this.

So that's great; you're not gonna get wet water everywhere.

but you can also do other things.

So let's say you decide you want to start with peat pellets instead.

So some people do this, you put a seed in here you just stick it in water and it expands – that's one option.

You, can use peat or in this case these are cow pots so this is cow manure, basically, pots – biodegradable – the idea being that as the seedlings develop and the roots start to come out the sides you just put this whole thing in the ground and it biodegrades and fertilizes the plant as its growing.

You can use those.

You can start seeds in plastic containers, styrofoam cups, anything.

This is just a yogurt container.

Poke some holes in the bottom, you put your seed starting mix in it – there you go.

Now you would want to cover this with Saran wrap or a plastic bag you just kind of put it on top like that like a dome, as your as your greenhouse.

Or you can use any sort of recyclable plastic things.

This is, Jack's spinach was in this.

You poke some holes in the bottom, you would fill it with about that much potting mix – you you really don't need much, an inch or two something like that, sow your seeds in it, put the lid back on, put it in your tray so you can water it from the bottom.

One of the things with all of these it's really important to keep in mind that you need to water from the bottom.

If you're watering from on top like with a watering can or something, you're going to end up flattening your seedlings as they emerge.

The seeds will wash away and won't be in the trays where you put them, so you're always going to water from the bottom and that's why you like that tray.

Okay so that's what you grow your seeds in lots of different options.

The next thing seeds need for germination many of them, at least the ones that you're going to grow indoors, is heat so if you're growing in, say, a colder garage or maybe you're growing in like i grow them out here outdoors and we're in Tucson right now and It's cool at night.

It gets down to about 50.

That's a little on the cold side.

But in the day it's in the 70s which is perfect, so I can do that but you need to give your seedlings some supplemental heat, and the easiest way to do that is with a seedling heat mat.

It arrives rolled up, you you plug it in, and it heats up.

It's not waterproof.

It's water resistant.

So don't submerge it in the water.

Don't put it in the bath to wash it or something like that, but if it gets wet it's fine.

So you can throw your seeds directly on this.

If you want you to put your containers on it, I prefer to put the seed mat underneath the waterproof tray.

What this does is it heats up to 85, 90 degrees maybe and it heats the soil, the seed starting mix in your containers.

It heats that up as well.

There are some seeds, particularly things again like tomatoes and peppers, that need to be at maybe about 85 degrees (the soil) in order to germinate.

So without this heat mat you're unlikely to get the soil warm enough to successfully germinate your seeds.

Or if you do manage to without the heat mat you're going to be much more successful with the heat mat.

Now these come in different sizes; this one's four feet long 22 inches 20 inches and I use it because one of these will fit on it and I can stack a lot of them side-by-side.

This one runs about a hundred bucks so it's not cheap.

It's well worth it if you're going to be starting a lot of seeds.

You can buy it anywhere – on Amazon a lot of companies sell these and make them.

So far I haven't found any real differences between the different brands.

They're all essentially the same, so go with whatever you can find.

If this is something that isn't in your budget, there are other things you can do to create a warm environment for your seeds.

Seeds don't need light in order to germinate, so you can put them, for example, in a closet.

Maybe you've got a warm closet that's next to the hot-water heater or the furnace or something like that put your seedlings in there.

You can put them on top of the fridge.

That generates quite a lot of heat.

You can put them beside your computer or your TV – but be really careful with that – you don't want to short out your system by getting it wet.

Another option is to use a metal tray or a metal shelf and put this on it and put an incandescent light bulb underneath.

A 40 watt what bulb should do it.

It has to be incandescent so that can be you know those old-fashioned light bulbs or a halogen bulb.

An LED isn't going to do it because it doesn't give off heat, nor do fluorescent lights really.

So, again, it has to be an incandescent light bulb, to heat that up.

I sometimes get asked, "well if it needs heat, can I put this in front of a sunny window?" That's going to get really nice and warm during the day and that's true it might get really nice and warm during the day, but what happens at night? Generally, as the temperatures go down outside, that window – unless it's some triple insulated thing – it's going to get cold and it's going to cool down your seeds to below the temperature at which they're going to germinate.

So I don't recommend trying to germinate in say a south or west facing window and expecting it to heat things up.

So the next step then is filling up your seed trays with potting mix.

So let's go ahead and do that.

So iIm just gonna fill my tray with the pre-moistened mix.

I'm not gonna pack it in there or anything I'm just going to lightly put it in like that and then what I'm gonna do is each one of these, I'm just going to lightly push down the center.

Nothing too hard, I just want to make sure there are no air pockets in there.

And then I'm going to fill it one more time.

And again I'm not going to pack it in there.

I'm just going to flatten it out like that okay and that is all there is to it.

I'm just gonna go ahead and fill all of them right now.

Well, there we go! We have all of the 72 cells full of seed starting mix just lightly tapped down a bit so that it's not gonna blow away.

The process that you used to fill this is exactly the same as you would do with larger ones.

So if I was filling something like this, for example, I would do the same process.

Lightly fill it, push down the center, lightly fill it again.

So the next step then is to actually sow the seeds.

You're going to find your seeds.

I have a ton of seeds I'm going to be growing this year.

I have a lot of hot peppers.

Jack likes hot hot hot peppers, so we've been growing Trinidad Scorpion and Ghost Pepper and this year I'm growing for him Carolina Reaper.

Now this is the hottest hot pepper out there (supposedly even more hot than the ghost pepper) so we're gonna try that.

Every seed packet should tell you on the back how long it's going to take to germinate.

Now not all of them do, this one, these seeds are from Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds they don't say it.

I get a lot of seeds from Renée's Garden.

They're terrific; they have a ton of information on the back, exactly when to sow it, how deep, how far apart I want to germinate – all of that kind of information.

It's terrific.

Botanical Gardens is another one that has a lot of seeds, and they'll put that information on as well.

So look for that information if it's there.

These are pretty small seeds, so you're going to want to just lightly cover them when you sow them.

You're not going to push them way down into the middle.

Although peppers are pretty resilient.

You can poke that thing down about half an inch and it will probably still germinate, but for best germination, just going to lightly lay it on the surface.

I'm going to put two seeds in each cell.

Now you don't have to do that and for larger plants, ones that come up really quickly and have very very big seedlings, I wouldn't do that, but for something smaller like this I'm going to put two in each cell.

I'm doing that because there's a chance that they won't germinate.

So by putting two in each cell, the end result is I'm probably going to have one nice strong seedling in each of these cells.

If they both come up, by the time they have their first set of true leaves, what i'm going to do is I'm going to pull out or cut off the spindlier, thinner or weaker one, get rid of it, and let the stronger one grow.

Let me just go ahead and put these seeds in.

So they're just laying on the surface right now and I go to just make sure they're nice and firmly there, some of them are going under.

Then what I'm gonna do is I'm going to take a little bit of mix and just spread it on top like that.

So that they're covered but just a little bit and that's it.

We now have Carolina Reaper seeds in here.

The question is how am I ever gonna know that? So one thing – don't forget to do – is put labels on your seedlings or your seeds.

You have a lot of different options.

For example, here's these little wooden they're kind of like popsicle sticks, but they're sold specifically for seeds.

But you don't need to get the ones that are shaped like this, you can buy just regular popsicle sticks or craft sticks at craft stores.

Hardware stores sometimes have them, and you'd simply write on it the name of what you've planted, and stick it in there.

You can also use these are just plastic tags that have come out of plants that I bought.

Write on the back with the seeds that you're planting.

You can get all sorts of different sizes.

This is another seed tag label thing that I bought.

Now something to keep in mind is, as you're doing that, don't forget you've got to put your greenhouse cover on top.

You want to make sure that those seed labels aren't too tall.

This one isn't going to work.

What I recommend is make sure before you stick these in that they're short enough, and something like this – what I would do is, I've simply cut it in half and then I have two for the price of one.

And there you go.

You can write on these with pencil, a china marker, a sharpie.

Something indelible or that isn't gonna run because they're gonna get kind of moist when you've got the greenhouse lid on.

You don't want to come back in a few weeks and realize you can't read what it says on here.

The plastic ones are a little easier that way.

You can use a sharpie or a pencil actually works really well on these.

These wooden ones you know, when you do transplant these into your garden, these wooden ones probably aren't going to last very long.

So what I normally do, if I want to know what these plants are when I transplant them, I'm going to use something like this.

And I write on it with either a sharpie or a china marker, and stick that in with the plant because these tend to fall apart and kind of disintegrate over the season.

So okay so these are Carolina Reapers.

Now, once I've got my seeds all set up in there I'm going to give a very light mist Just so that the surface is nice and moist.

Now you don't want to make it wet.

You don't want anything sopping wet at any time, just keep it nice and moist and put the lid on it.

The other thing I'm going to do is I'm going to water it and when you have your seeds in here, you don't want to water from on top.

A lot of people will do that.

They'll get out a watering can or something and try to water from on top.

There are a couple of problems with that.

First being you start watering on top and you wash away the seeds.

Or if you actually have seedlings that have come up already, you're gonna flatten them, you're gonna break them.

You don't want to do that so it's not as good to water from on top.

The other thing with watering from on top is you can't really tell how much water you've put in, and you could find that you're ending up with water sitting in the bottom of this container and you're going to end up with fungal problems.

Mold, fungus, gnats all sorts of nasty things.

You don't want that so with these it's a little harder.

You're gonna have to lift it up and you're going to pour in enough water.

Maybe a quarter of the way up to the sides of the cells every time you water.

And it should absorb it all.

If, after 15 minutes, you come and take a look and there's still water in the bottom, pour that off.

You don't want this sitting in water.

That's all there is to it for starting seeds! In our next video, I'm going to show you what happens when these seeds germinate, because when they start to come up you're gonna need to do a few things differently.

First of all, you're gonna take it off the heat.

You don't need heat any more.

But then there are some things that your plants absolutely need at that point and there's one extra little thing that many people don't know about, but that makes a real difference in having really strong, stocky plants that are going to do really well.

Thank you for coming and looking at this video and if you want to see what happens next, why don't you subscribe to our YouTube channel? You'll get all of our seed starting videos.

You can also visit gardeningproductsreview.

Com, that's our website.

You'll find these videos there as well, with detailed notes,downloads, all sorts of links, and where you can buy things, as well as a ton of other resources and – just like it sounds like -reviews of products including all of the seed starting things that you see right here.

Source: Youtube

Posted by in growing herbs Tags: , , , , , on Sep 13, 2019

All of our vegetable plants and herbs areready for the season.

We've got a great variety of tomatoes, peppers,broccoli, squash, melons.

So come on down and check us out!.

Source: Youtube

some interesting additions to theCalifornia garden bountiful spring harvest some helpful tips for yourraised bed garden and a lot more in today's episode of California gardeningwe will begin with a garden tour we will look at all the harvests we made we havesome things for you to do in your garden and finally we will look at some coolgardening products so let's begin with the garden tour starting with the raisedbeds we have our black Cobra pepper that was overwinter is producing a lot ofpeppers now followed by the Anaheim chili peppers which are doing okay andthe container prince eggplant which we planted a lot of these in this raisedbed right next to the eggplants we have theokras and because the weather has not been very warm some of these okra plantsare not doing that well but hopefully they will start picking up as theweather warms up and our tomato jungle as you can see here just for tomatoplants but they have taken off and are producing a lot of tomatoes on the otherside we have some more okra plants again not doing that well and we are growingsome beans as you can see here right along the edge of the bed and on the other bed the first bed wehave some onions that are still growing couple of eggplant some cucumbers andhere we have some hyacinth beans that are growing they are just sprouting andit will be a little bit of time before they become big plants and thatconcludes the tour of our raised beds let's now look at the containers we aretrying to grow a loquat tree for the first time and I'm super excited aboutit our volunteer tomato plant has produceda lot of tomatoes as you can see here in this container our container Prince eggplant has nowproduced eggplants as you can see beautiful looking eggplantsand we are also trying to grow a mango tree and I'm very excited for this aswell we have some amaranth greens that aregrowing in this container we have a lone cauliflower that will beharvested next month and our potatoes The Container potatoesare growing very well and I'm pretty impressed with how long they have beengrowing and now let's look at the harvest wemade beginning with cilantro now cilantro is a cool season crop growsbest in the cooler spring and the fall weather and we were noticing that thecilantro was beginning to bold since the temperatures were warming up a littlebit this week actually was quite warm and as you can see here the harvestlooks quite good and once your cilantro starts bolting what you can do is startchopping off the cilantro at the stems and then the top part of the cilantrowill still give you a lot of cilantro as you can see here it's a pretty goodharvest and fresh cilantro is absolutely amazing and as you can see here the stems havenow become more woody and almost about to bolt and you'll see a difference oncethe stems reach to this size where they have become woody now you can still keepharvesting it from the sides and let the plant grow but at this stage I thinkit's a good idea to just remove the plants and then use your harvest and useyour container for the next plant you can already see some flowers growingthere and this is an indication that the cilantro has bolted and now let's look at kohlrabiwe were growing these purple kohlrabi plants in our raised beds and this hasactually been one of the longest growing seasons for our kohlrabi and this time Imade sure we waited long enough to have good sized bulbs the last time Iharvested kohlrabi the bulbs were quite small but they were also a little morecrunchy and more usable than the large bulbs so with kohlrabi it's just atoss-up between either harvesting bulbs early where you get smaller bulbs orwait for a long time and get bulbs like these the ones that you see herethat are a little woody from the outside but once you remove the skin thekohlrabi inside is very tender very nice and it tastes amazing and here you cansee some more harvests and a question that I was asked on my Instagram postwhen I posted the kohlrabi picture was how do I use my kohlrabi well theeasiest thing to do with kohlrabi is to just eat them raw they taste amazingwhen eaten raw and they also taste amazing when cooked so when cooking it Ijust chopped it up and then I boil it with lentils add some spices some gingersome coconut and then just cook it up and then it tastes amazing with eitherquinoa or rice and kohlrabi makes a great vegetable to grow in your gardenit is just so easy to grow kohlrabi you should give it a shot and now let's look at mulberries we hada mulberry tree that's been growing in our side yard for quite a long time nowand this mulberry is the mulberry that will bloom multiple times during theyear this is I think the third time it has bloomed and produced mulberries onthis tree so although the mulberries are quite small this mulberry tree producesa lot of mulberries and as you can see here the harvest is not that great involume but almost every day we were just coming picking some berries the kidswere eating it right off of the plant so if you want to get a lot of berries in asmall space this is a good variety to grow but I am going to try some othermulberry variety is very soon and let you know how that goes and moving on to onions we were growingthis small bulbing kind of onions the ones that produces smaller bulbs but canbe eaten as spring onions and we started harvesting them from our raised bed andthese have been growing since fall so it's been growing for quite a while andas you can see the bulbs have formed and it's a good time to start harvestingthese spring onions now the way these onions are eaten is byjust washing them up and then chopping them up just like you see here andusually eaten raw I love eating these onions raw but youcan use it just like any other onion as wellsince our raised bed had so many plants we harvested it little by little andthen eventually one day we just harvested them alland this is exactly how it's washed and eaten mostly rawand kids love harvesting onions it's one of their favorite vegetables to harvestbecause they're just so easy to harvest and we did grow a lot of onions in thissmall space so this was a very productive raised bed and the soil that we are using for ouronions is also quite loose and that is the key to growing good onions is tohave a very well draining soil although onions do require a lot ofwater just before harvest a few days or a few weeks before the harvest you canstop watering your onions but in this case these onions are slightly differentbecause they are spring onions and they are eaten raw you want a little bit ofjuicy flavor when you're eating the onionsso you don't have to stop watering completely so that the onions have alittle bit of juice left inside them and you can also harvest these onions andthen dry them just like any other onions you can leave them out in the Sun andthey will do very well they will dry out and you can store them just like anyother onions as well and as you can see here the kids love toharvest the onions as well the soil for the onion should be light enough so thateven kids can just pull them out this is my daughter she is just pulling outthese onions with great ease and this is how it should be your soil should beloose and it should be loose enough for the onions to be pulled out very easilylike you see here and once again gardening is a lot of joyespecially with kids kids love gardening and they love to help their parents inthe garden and it's a real joy to do gardening with kidsand now let's look at the black Cobra pepper this was overwintered from lastyear and it did pretty well I wasn't expecting this pepper plant to be overwintered and produce peppers right away but overwintering your plants helps youget your produce right at the beginning of the seasonwhich means that since the plant is overwintered it will start triggeringfruits in the beginning or as soon as the weather is nice and warm for it toproduce peppers and as you can see there are a lot of peppers and this is anextremely hot pepper for those of you who want to grow extremely hot peppersthis is a good option but for those of you who do not like hot peppers you maywant to try some other variety now I have a pretty good tolerance for hotpeppers and I find this pepper really hot to eat so this is a pepper that'svery high on the Scoville rating for sureand moving on to potatoes we were growing the Yukon Gold potatoes in ourraised beds and it was time to harvest those potatoes now I would have likedthe potatoes to grow a little longer than this harvest time but it's still agood time to harvest these potatoes because the potatoes were forming verywell and we harvested one potato plant just to check how big the potatoes wereand they are quite big we are using the trench method to growthese potatoes we basically planted these potatoes in a trench and as theplants grew we started covering them up now some people also call this thehealing method but in the hilling method generally you start at one level andthen keep adding soil over the potato plantin the trench method you can actually plant the potato very deep and thencover it with soil so there are similar methods but also a little different insome ways in any case you want to make sure that you cover your potato plantswith soil once they are growing and the reason for doing that is to preventgreen potatoes from being formed on the plant the green potatoes are not ediblethey should not be used and this is one of the reasons why we cover the potatoplants as they grow and in this case by planting this potatoplant in a trench it was also able to use some of the nutrients from thenative soil below the raised bed and I think that helped the potato plant growquite well and as you can see here these Yukon Goldpotatoes produce a lot of large potatoes and taste wise I think Yukon Goldpotatoes are extremely delicious they have a nice buttery taste to them and Ireally like eating Yukon Gold potatoes and they're also easy to grow so onceyou start seeing decent size potatoes harvested from one plant you can goahead and harvest the other plants as well now if you are not planning to usethese potatoes right away they will store very well under ground and stillbe available for consumption or storage after you harvest them laterbut we still harvested all our potatoes together we wanted to use this raisedbed for the next crop and as you can see the potatoes arequite deep into the soil and that's because we planted them in a trench and this is one more vegetable that kidslove to harvest and this is how our first harvest lookslike as you can see quite decently sized potatoes they look pretty and they tasteabsolutely delicious now since the potatoes were of decentsize we went ahead and harvested the rest of the potatoes from the raised bed and the soil for a raised bed was quiteloose and not compacted at all and that helped the potatoes grow very well inthis raised bed now for growing potatoes you want to use a lot of compost we havea lot of worms in this bed as well that are producing vermicompost all the timeand we also have some perlite which helps with the aeration and drainage forthis raised bed mix you're harvesting the potatoes make sureto look around everywhere in the soil you never know where the potato ishiding some of these potatoes can be absolutely huge so make sure you harvestall the potatoes and once you are done harvesting just make sure you turn overthe soil in the entire raised bed and then check for any other potatoes thatmight be growing now one of the things about the Yukon Gold potatoes is that itis susceptible to blight more than most of the varieties that have grown andwhen light hits you have to remove the leaves and remove all the plants and Iwill be showing that in detail in a later section in this video but that'ssomething to note that different potato varieties have different characteristicsand different disease resistance so the Yukon Gold potato although it's quitelarge in size and it tastes amazing it is susceptible to blight late blightwhich means that the potato plant will start having discolored leaves later inthe season and eventually die but the other potato variety that I'm growing inthe container did not have this problem so it really depends on what you'relooking for I would still go for the best potato variety that I like to eatand which produces decently sized potatoes but if you want lessmaintenance then you should try growing some other potatoes and you can see some roots that arecoming into this raised bed and this is a common problem if you have treesaround your raised bed garden and that's why you want to have your trees awayfrom any raised bed gardening that you're doing if you have large treesespecially like pine trees or really large trees they will send out roots andthey will send out roots that go into your raised bed and get all thenutrients from your vegetable garden and in my case I have some fruit trees veryclose to this raised bed every time I harvest vegetables from this raised bedI do make sure that I remove all the roots around itand this is how our harvest looks like as you can see beautiful lookingpotatoes and we are going to use them right away so we've washed them if youwant to store them you can leave the dirt on and they store better in thatcase but we wanted to use these potatoes right away and we need a quick weigh-infor all the potatoes that we had and as you can see a lot of good size potatoesand on an average you can get about 4 to 5 potatoes per plant so as long asyou're meeting that target like 3 to 4 at least then you have had a goodharvest because these are organically grown and they taste amazingthey are really fresh if you harvest these potatoes and try to cut them youcan see the freshness you can see that they're crisp and very deliciousand this is how our harvest looks like and let's do a final weigh-in and ourpotatoes weigh in at 13 pounds which is an impressive harvest from just one 4foot by 4 foot raised bed and the potatoes will store for about a fewweeks and I hope you like this Yukon Goldpotato harvest moving on to strawberries we weregrowing our strawberries in this strawberry grow bagand the benefit of using this grow bag was that the strawberries were a lotcleaner when we harvested them as you can see not much of insect damage or anydirt that can get into these strawberries so I really liked thisstrawberry planting bag and I will provide a link to this grow bag in thevideo description and the comments below and strawberries will usually produce inthe spring and the summer season and you can see here beautiful lookingstrawberries and we were able to harvest strawberries multiple times during thegrowing season this month these strawberries just kept producingand the other benefit of using this grow bag is that you can grow multiplevarieties of strawberry in the same bag and which is why we actually havedifferent varieties each growing out from each pocket of this strawberry growbag and here you can see the strawberries a lot of strawberries thatwe harvested so overall I was quite happy with the way the strawberryplanter bag produces helps you grow strawberries that producefruits that are quite clean quite nice and harvested fresh from your homegarden and finally Tomatoes we harvested our first tomato of the season and youcan see here beautiful looking tomato and our tomato plants have taken offquite well and this was a first tomato harvest and we expect a lot moretomatoes to grow in this tomato bed and now let's look at the things for youto do in your garden this month the first thing you can do is plant somemore summer vegetables we are planting some watermelon seeds here this is thegiant watermelon and I've usually noticed that the giant variety of seedsare not very viable this is the giant pepper as well andwe're going to see how these seeds germinate the viability of the seeds isa big question especially for these giant seeds but we'll see how it goes weare sowing these seeds and this seed packet is from this year so hopefully weshould get a decent germination rate from these seeds now we are also sewing some pole beansthese pole beans will go on to our raised bed where it will grow on thelarge easy trellis and you can see here the beans they look amazing these seedsare quite nice we are going to be sewing these seeds in these seed starting cellsand they will usually germinate in a few days now I was talking about the blightfor the potatoes you can see that the leaf so the potatoes look like this whenthey are struck with late blight and in this scenario you can see that theleaves are quite severely affected now you should be watching out for this Iactually was a little delayed in removing these leaves but if you seeblight you should immediately remove these leaves The Container potatoesdon't have this problem it was only the Yukon Gold potatoes if a growing in theraised bed that had the blight but the solution to that is you just remove thefoliage just remove them and do not compost them just throw themand you can also start transplanting your summer vegetables in this case wetransplanted our okra seedlings we are trying to grow a lot of okra this seasonbut the weather has been cooler than usual for a spring season which is quitesurprising actually because it's now end of May and we are still having somecooler days which is a little surprising for this time of the year but we arestill going to go ahead and plant our okra seedlings because they need sometime to settle down before the summer sets in and once the summer season is onand when the weather is hot the okra plants thrive we just love to grow inthe warm or hot summer weather so we want to make sure that we get our plantsin before the summer starts and now let's review some gardening productsthis month we will be reviewing some interesting products from a companycalled VermiSterra and they have two products that we will see todayone is the VermiSterra vermicompost and the other product is the VermiSterraworm tea now a little bit about this company first VermiSterra is afamily-owned company located in thermal Southern California they have a hugewarm farm with red wigglers that they feed with organic matter like grass andtree clippings their farm for over 20 years to learn the benefits of usingnatural organic soil amendments and their products our OMRI certified theytake care to make sure their worms are fed only organic matter to create agreat quality vermicompost and warm tea the vermi compost and worm tea areneutral pH so it won't burn plants and is safe for seedlings as well so theVermiSterra vermicompost is a very fine vermicompost and it comes in two gradesone is a standard grade that we are seeing here it's a little coarse and canbe used very effectively on raised beds and in gardens in the soil and there isalso a premium grade which you can use for seed starting mixes or for indoorplants now to use this vermicompost I usually prepare my raised beds with alot of organic matter so this is a good amendment to theraised bed and as you can see here you can add this directly on the raised bedand once you have added this on your raised bed all you do is just mix itvery well into the soil and vermicompost has a lot of beneficialnutrients that will help your plants uptake all the nutrients pretty quicklynow you can also sprinkle some vermicompost along the plants that youare already growing in your raised beds or in the ground and this will add a lotof rich organic matter into your soil and all you do is just use a cultivatorto mix it in very well with the soil and this is also a good time to get rid ofany weeds that are there in your raised bed or the soil and the main benefit ofusing the vermicompost or the warm tea is that it helps plants uptake nutrientsand this results in stronger plants that can fight off insects and diseasesand the next product we are looking at is the worm tea which comes in threedifferent sizes as you see here and it is basically tea that is prepared fromvermicompost and it also has a lot of good beneficialnutrients that you can give to your plantsnow this worm tea has to be mixed with water in order for you to apply this toyour garden and you can do a foliar application as well as drench your soilwith this worm tea this is a 1/3 cup measurement and whatI'm doing is I'm taking about 6 of this measurement 6 to 7 is good enough for a2 gallon container and you can look at the instructions on the label to see howmuch you need to mix with water in order to apply it to your plantsnow once you've added the worm tea into your watering canyou can just fill it up with water and then what I usually do is just drench myplants completely with this solution and what I'm doing here is I'm adding a lotof beneficial nutrients beneficial bacteria into the soil and this willreally help the plants uptake a lot of nutrients now these okra plants were not doing toogreat and I really wanted to revitalize these okra plants and the worm teareally helps in such scenarios it's very similar to seaweed where it reallyinvigorates the plants and helps them build a stronger system stronger stemstronger leaves and this really helps with overall plant growth so it isrecommended that you use this product in your garden every week but I would sayeven if you use it every 15 days or so it's a good addition to your garden bedor your soil you're adding a lot of beneficial nutrients in the soil and this product looked to be a verygreat quality it was well packaged and we will see the results soon we willwait for a few weeks or a few months to see how our plants do but if you'redoing organic gardening this is a great addition to your gardenand I also like supporting family-owned companies especially in SouthernCalifornia so if you want to buy their productsplease do check out the links in the comments below and in the videodescription below so there we have it folks that was ourepisode on the California Garden for the month of April if you like this video dogive us a thumbs up if you have any comments leave them inthe comments box below we'll see you again soon happy gardening.

Source: Youtube

Hello everyone, I am Rin of Lunatic's Delightand welcome to my garden.

Starting off here in this little bowl we haveJohnny Jump Ups from seed.

Here we have a Gerber Daisy that is yellowwith a dark eye.

Just to the right of that we have a Gladiolusin an unknown color and next to that we have a Bonanza Orange Marigold and then a orange-ypeach Dahlia.

And next to that we have a French Marigoldin the color Disco Marietta and a Dianthus in coconut surprise which smells like cinnamoncandy! Just behind the Dianthus we have two moreGladiola in unknown colors.

In front of the Gladiola we have another FrenchMarigold in Disco Marietta and another Marigold here in front of a flower with aninteresting story.

This flower is named Private Ryan becauseof the twelve Zephyranthes I planted, it's the only one that didn't pop up, but insteadwas growing underground and I had to rescue it.

Here to the right of private Ryan we haveanother Marigold in Disco Marietta and behind that we have a California Calla Lily in FlameSunrise I believe it is called.

Here we have the most recent addition to thegarden, which is a White Veitchii Gardenia.

And this is a plant I have wanted for quite some time, this is a white snap dragon, which Ihave named Shāo and I also have a red one here named Ran and they are named after thedragons from Avatar: The Last Airbender.

Here we have some Sassy Sarsaparilla Jasmine,which smells like root beer! And here are some Carnations from seed.

I don't know what colors those are going tobe yet, there still very little!~ And next to them we have a Purple de Oro Day Lily.

And next to that, we have George the succulent! Hanging out in his little glass jar that Igot for him.

And here is some Super bells in the colorBlue Moon Punch.

Kind of a hanging basket type plant, but they'redoing good there.

And next to them, is a Rápido Blue Bell flowerwhich I have named Lupin because bell flowers look a lot like moon flowers which I was gonnaname 'em Moony, but Moony is Lupin's name in Harry Potter, thus, Lupin.

Back here we have more Marigolds in DiscoMarietta and a True Lily and here we have and African Daisy in Serenity White with threeGeraniums, two in Hot Pink and one in Violet.

Over here we have some Rosemary.

And some Chives and some Munstead [English] Lavender.

Here is some Golden Sage, culinary grade GoldenSage.

Osteospermum Blushing Beauties here.

Their flowers are looking a little sad, theiralmost spent, but we do have two of these plants and the second one has a lot of budson it so we should get some more flowers soon! Behind them we have a clematis of unknowncolor name, but its kind of a purple-y color, single flower that we got for Earth Day froma plant breeder.

And next to that, we have a Hibiscus in TahitiWind named Tiki.

Below Tiki we have another True Lily and nextto that we have a Fire Dance Torch Lily and next to that we have a Dahlia in the colorMarissa.

And last, but certainly not least, we havemy rose! This is a Sugar Moon Tea Rose and here's apicture of what the blossoms will look like when they fully open.

This plant smells absolutely amazing and Iam so excited to finally have a rose! I have wanted one for so long and I can'twait to have all kinds of flowers from this.

Oh, I also forgot to mention that we namedthe Serenity White African Daisy, Serenity, after the ship in Firefly because that's oneof our favorite shows and it seemed fitting! And that's all for now! If you'd like me to make an update video inthe future, please give this video a thumbs up! Thanks so much for watching and I'll see yain the next, bye!.

Source: Youtube

Posted by in seed saving Tags: , , , , , , , on Sep 13, 2019

(electronic music) – In Sheridan and in Buffalo, there's a local foodskind of rumbling.

– [Announcer] In theworld of small farming, there's a movement afoot.

– [Female Voice] Withoutseed, there is nothing.

– [Announcer]Small-scale farmers around the countryare seeing access to one of their mostvital resources shrinking.

– It used to bethat every farmer was saving seed,and maybe he was trading seed with his neighbors, but in general everyonewas saving seed, and now that'sjust not the case.

– [Announcer] Inthe last 60 years, a fundamental skill has vanished from the hands of farmers.

– Until probably the 1950s, there wouldn't have been a need to educate farmersabout seed saving, because they were all doing it.

But with the growth ofthe agricultural industry and the seed industry, particularly afterthe Green Revolution, you see that seed was sort of taken out of the farmer's hands, and put into thehands of seed business and seed companies.

– [Announcer] In our modern, technology-drivenera, food production has become increasinglyspecialized, at the cost ofdiversity and access.

– The farmer, youhave to understand, you needed to payfor the equipment, and so he bought in to this, 'cause he could growmore dependable crops.

They were disease resistant.

They were prolific.

They looked beautiful, and they stayed on theshelf in a grocery store for days and days and days, as opposed to that seedhis grandmother had.

– [Announcer] Seed Savers, on this Farm to Fork Wyoming.

– [Announcer] Fundingfor Farm to Fork Wyoming is provided by WyomingCommunity Bank, your locally-ownedcommunity bank in Riverton and Lander, and on the web at www.

Wyocb.

Com.

And by viewers like you.

Thank you.

(electronic music) – Here's the thing.

We wanna feed the world.

I mean we wanna feed the world.

We wanna make sureeverybody has food.

– [Announcer] Moreback yard to mid-scale food producers are realizing they play an importantpart in our resilience.

– [Female Voice] Butwhat we've got is a world of malnourished obesity.

– [Announcer] As today'sindustrial food system champions the causeof feeding the world, local growers arewondering, at what cost? – There is a lot of focus on, let's feed the world,which, by the way, I don't really agree with.

I think people shouldfeed themselves, and to be let alone to do that, and if they needhelp, doing something because they're going to starve, then people need to be fed.

But, that is not something that you have to do all the time because it destroysthe economies in other places ifyou provide food from, what? How many thousands of miles does the food go now? – [Announcer] Many argue that increasedproduction has brought us more food, but less security.

– We're not growing seeds for taste and nutrition.

We are growing them for storage, and transportation, and so you're gettingempty calories.

You're getting less nutrition, but they're beautiful.

You're getting alonger store life, a longer storage life,but they're beautiful, and we're gettingdisease-resistant, nothing wants it.

The bugs do not want it.

We shouldn't either.

– [Announcer] Sothere's a growing effort to take food backinto our own hands.

– The Campbell CountyMaster Gardeners opened this seedlibrary in 2016, to provide a serviceto our community.

– I think thatthere's been a shift in our culture, and I think it's been reallyinteresting to watch in terms of like,younger people, millennials,looking to the past, as the way to maybefind some security.

So here you come,and you can get rid of that risk of buying seeds, because here you cancheck out seed for free.

And if it doesn't work, you're not out any money.

– I mean, with the worldthat we're living in, with technology,all these things, things are very different, and I think that we find an element of security from traditions, fromself sufficiency, things that we've kindof lost over the years.

– And we also wantedto do a small part to play in addressingfood insecurity in our community.

With some families in Gillette, like money is tight, and you might not have, you have to choosebetween buying groceries or buyinga pack of seeds, you might not chooseto buy a pack of seeds.

So you can come here,check out seeds for free, and give it a goin your own garden, see if they growand work for you.

– You see a lot ofwomen or a lot of people just in generalwho are interested in canning, or keeping chickens, or seed saving, orhaving a garden, and there's really,something's going on in the culture that is making us look to these sorts of things, and I think that that's part of the larger sort of, you know, with globalizationand technology, it's a way to find a little bit of security.

– It's not that I wantbig ag to go away.

I want there to bea lot of balance, so that we, people like me, that are veryinterested in plants that are natural, not modified, that we save those things.

– [Announcer]Traditional, unpatented, open-pollinated seeds are the starting point for many.

– [Female Voice] So then this is the black tomato,and then we've got another sort, I mean just, there's two drawers.

– That there is attention paid to saving thosethings, along with whatever's going on inconventional agriculture.

– No one can do it all,and the way I look at it is that we need adiversity of options, as well as a diversityof varieties, so if we only have one option, and that option is to buy seed from a big agribusiness company, then we're just limitingour possibilities.

What happens when that business gets bought by another one? And all of a sudden they retire the varieties that worked for Wyoming wheat growers,or things like that? Then people areleft in the lurch.

– [Female Voice] Iknow some of these Hopi black beans I've donated.

These are those ones from that defunct seed company.

– I think it'simportant to always have that diversity at every level, even at the business level.

– I think that'sa much better way, and a better way for survival, than it would be to become more of a monoculture in seeds.

– [Announcer] Sowhile seed technology has helped attain more food with less farmers, ithas come at the cost of freedom andgenetic diversity.

– They're reallygood at what they do.

They're really goodat what they do, but they don't doeverything, I think, and I think that that'swhat we need to remember, is that there are other markets that they're not addressing.

There are other growers that they're not addressing.

There are research questions that they're not even asking.

– [Announcer] Whatwas once shaped in the hands ofmany is now guided by only a few.

– On many levelsdiversity shrivels away, so first of all,your agribusiness is not interestedin small crops, or crops that are important for very specific regions.

– Extreme weather.

I mean, we have, yesterday it was22 in the morning, and it was 74 in the afternoon.

– They're notinterested in crops that are sort ofoutside the purview in your Walmarts or yournormal grocery stores.

– We grow Frech filet beans, and they're onlyabout two inches long.

– So, you're notgonna be able to find these really interestingpurple carrots, or these really interesting tiny green eggplants.

– We do have a lot of varieties.

We grow just about anything you possibly cangrown in Wyoming, and we keep trying it anyway.

– I have okra seeds.

I can grow okra.

– So things like that.

You know, most big agribusiness is not gonna begeared toward thinking that those areinteresting crops, whereas farmersare experimenters.

– What we're working on is kind of winter harvesting.

So these we put out, Ithink the first of April.

And we haven't done anything, and look at how,I mean it was down to 18 here, nothing on 'em, but the windows, so we now know that these will begood cultivators to save seed for.

– They love to try new things to see what's gonna work, what might do better, and eaters are the same way.

– Kids, kids are great.

Kids love purple peppers.

– So, when peoplesee those kinds of new crops incommercial markets, or even just at thefarmer's market, I feel like people getreally excited about it.

– So what we do is we're trying to broaden people'sbrains (laughs).

– And that feedbackis really important to making farmerstry new varieties, and say, oh, well, let's try these different crops, so that's one waythat having control over your seed is gonnaincrease biodiversity.

– I don't think people realize that the wholeentire historical, biological time capsulesin those little guys.

– I just think we ought to really educateourselves about seeds, about what they mean, about how important they are, and to have a great diversity of plants and seedsin our environment.

– Well, you know, seed is life.

A seed is everythingyou need for, I mean without seedswe'd all starve to death.

– [Announcer] Seed bankshave been developed in response to the lossof genetic diversity.

– In Svalbard, in Norway,they have a seed bank that's called (mumbles), so those seeds are nolonger being renewed.

You know, they are purelyjust storing the seed.

So, you know, I meanSyria's been so war torn and their seed bank is now gone, but a lot of the seedis still in Svalbard, and you know, hopefullywhen things calm down, they will be ableto reaccess that, but then there are also other kinds of seed banks, where really whatthey're doing is continuing to regeneratethe seed year after year to ensure that itdoesn't just die in the seed bank.

Of course, the USDAgerm plasm system also stores a lot of seed, but they also do havea regeneration program, so they're growing out the seed.

Those are reallyimportant resources for preserving germ plasm and genetic diversitythat can be accessed.

– You know, we live on about 150 crops, worldwide.

That's it.

So, developing manydifferent varieties, you keep the biodiversity alive.

You wanna keep biodiversity, because remember thatIrish potato famine? They grew a potatothat was wonderful.

It was great.

It was very productive.

It was a hearty potato,and then it got a fungus.

Because one seed didn't make it, thousands of people died or emigrated from their country.

– It's really theloss of knowledge around how to steward a variety, how to make sure that that variety staystrue, doesn't decrease in quality, doesn'tdecrease in resilience.

That kind of knowledge has also been widely lost.

– [Announcer] So today,there are groups working to restore traditionalplant breeding and seed saving amongsmall producers, for the public domain.

– So, I think themovement really comes from farmers whowant to exercise their right to save that seed.

They know that that's an input.

They know that it's themost important piece of what they do.

Without the seed,there is no crop.

You know, a lot ofthe other inputs you would still getsomething, you know? If you suddenly takeaway fertilizer, you're still gonnabe able to grow some kinds of crops.

You're still gonnabe able to get something out of your land, but without seed,there is nothing.

– [Announcer] Now,there's a revived interest in traditional seed stewardship.

– There are small tomid-sized seed companies.

– There are companiesnow that just work with saving seeds andmaking seeds available from the littleguy that invented the mortgage liftertomato, you know? And crazy named things.

– Seed libraries, thereare seed exchanges.

There's the indigenousseed network.

Those folks aredoing a lot of work.

– [Announcer] Becausethe food security we have today still rests on the genetic diversitybuilt by farmers through thousands of years of selective seed saving.

– Thank God there arethese little farmers saving seeds,because without them we would haveabsolutely nothing, 'cause you have to havean open-pollinated seed to even play with whenyou wanna hybrid it.

So, thank goodnessthat there are people that have done thisall over the world.

– The other people that I think we often forget about,and we really shouldn't, are the public universities.

Land grant universitieswere established for the purpose ofincreasing our knowledge about agriculture,and there are still public universities that have plant breeding programsthat are in danger of losing those programs,and we need them.

That is where so muchof the germ plasm that all of the other folks who are doing breedingprojects comes from, is from those universities.

– [Announcer] Theseare all efforts to offset a growing trend in restrictive ownershipof genetic diversity through patent overreach.

– So this is allabout giving it back to the people, andwe're basically wanting to democratize seed.

– We really believein putting seed back in the hands of farmers, making sure that theyare able to exercise their rights, andtheir responsibilities to provide and steward seed, and good varietiesfor organic systems.

We do that through research, so conducting variety trials, doing plant breeding, andalso through education, so teaching people howto do these practices.

so teaching people howto do these practices.

– Here's our firstseed experiment for this spring.

– Teaching workshopson seed production.

– This is just the pea patch, and here's the deal.

They bloom at different times.

Some are very early.

Some are verylate, so you're not cross pollinating at all.

– Also some technical expertise to make sure that people know how many plants doyou need to keep to maintain a population? How do you do theselection and grow gain? – Lettuce willsometimes bolt early, and so you might bein a rush and like, oh, here, it's bolting.

It's gonna produce seed, and we'll just takeseeds for that, don't.

Save seed from yourbest, healthiest plants that have the traitsthat you want.

– What does it look liketo run a variety trial on your farm? How much work is it? How do you take that data and then make it meaningful? – [Announcer] Thisrestoration of knowledge is key to maintainingand increasing these shared seed resources.

Meanwhile, seedlibraries for the public are cropping up all over.

– So we have afount of different tomato varieties, andthe important thing to remember aboutthe seed library is we can only takeopen-pollinated varieties, so we can't take anyseed that's been patented or that's GMO seed, because we are sharingthese seeds for free.

– So urban gardening,I mean there's a lot out there for urban gardening.

I mean, grow food.

Teach your childrenwhere it comes from, for goodness sake.

Everybody can grow food.

It's nothing.

It takes nothing.

You put a seed in the ground.

– And so when we get donations from seed companies,we do let them know, this seed is gonnabe here for free for the community, so that's why we only accept open-pollinated varieties.

– [Announcer] WhileGillette Seed Library is housed at the localag extension office, seed libraries are proliferating in public librariesacross the country.

– So this is the seed catalog.

This is where allthe seeds live.

So they're kind of organized, so this is vegetables,and the herbs start here, and flowers.

Everything's organizedalphabetically and then by variety.

So if you came in here, and you could saywe've got beans.

And so this is like ablue lake pull bean.

It's got all the information, scientific name,days to maturity, and then this sticker here indicates ease of saving, so green is easy.

What's really importantwith libraries is the community, orthe space for that and where a spacethat's open to everyone regardless of class,regardless of position.

I mean, your countycommissioner down to somebody who doesn't have a home.

We're all in thisspace together, and that's what makesus really unique, and so we have to reallybe conscious of that, and we have to provideaccess for everyone, but I feel like theother part of access is sharing, and the seeds are an extension of that, because they're knowledge.

They're tools.

They're somethingthat we all use.

We all eat food, and we all consume things, and it's really just another way to empower people withknowledge and food.

– Guess what? You could harvest some of it.

You isolate a plant, or you just pick thebest plant you have, the best tomato, andthen you save that seed.

– Like here's a green tomato, and the thing for usis our growing seasons are so short, right? So like this one, 85 daysis a long time for us, so we want kind of things.

We want to get thingsdown to the 60 range, usually for tomatoes.

– Eventually we'dlike to create seeds that are acclimated and adapted to our climate, sothat when you check out a seed from our seed library, you know it's gonnagrow well here.

Because it's been saved from a member of our community, brought back tothe seed library, and then you can use it and grow it in your garden.

– And so that's partof like adapting, and see this one's better.

77 days, so and then you'll see with the yellowsticker that this is, instead of easy it'dbe like intermediate.

But it's still pretty easy.

Yeah.

– Regional adaptationis so important, particularly for regionsthat are underserved by agribusiness.

– We're such a unique, like we're a microclimate, and there's not alot of information on like our zones, and how short ourgrowing season is, and so there's someunique challenges to seed saving here,and gardening here.

– Most of the farmersthat we work with are not in the corn belt, so they're not reallybeing thought of in terms of what kinds of crops should be grown.

– Now these allsurvive very nicely when it was about24 degrees down here in the (mumbles) shed.

– [Announcer] It isthis simple process in the hands of many, through the previous11,000 years that has createdthe vast majority of crop adaptations enjoyed around the world today.

– We saved a lot of these seeds, but all of them aredefinitely heirlooms, open-pollinated,some are heirlooms.

– There were some winter peas that a gentleman saved, that survived that40 below cold snap we had last winter, so now we have, and he's like I don't know how theylived, but they lived, and so, you know, that's how we're getting these adaptations.

That's how thesethings are happening, and so now we havethose available in the seed library, you know? So, maybe it's notan impossible dream to grow in winter (laughs).

– [Announcer] Plantshave a variety of life strategiesthat make some easier to save seedfrom than others.

– So we have 27different gardens, and we have it spreadout quite a ways.

We do seed saving in acouple of different ways.

One of them is we rotate, so when something is in bloom, the other one isn't.

So if you're growingtwo kinds of beans, one comes to bloom first,and then the other, so you can save theseed from the first one, 'cause you don't wantcross pollination.

The other thing too is like we can plant somethingthis far away, and I have a chartthat tells you how far away you could plant for seed saving, you know.

Or if you'll onlyplant one cultivator, like one kind of pea, then that seed's fine.

– Some of the things likewith cross pollination and stuff like that, that's a little more advanced, you aren't necessarilythinking about squash and pumpkinscross pollinate, and so I save those seeds and the next year Ididn't know what I had.

– So if you do wanna save seeds from squash, you haveto isolate the blossoms, and you preferably willself pollinate those, with like a cottonswab or something.

You isolate that blossom, so then you knowthat you're getting a true to type seedfrom that plant.

– There are crops that are mostlyself pollinating, and then there are crops that are mostly crossing, and then there's sort ofeverything in between, so mostly self pollinating crops would be things like lettuce, and peas, andmostly out crossing would be brassicas.

– Brassicas are the hardest.

That would be cauliflower,brussel sprouts, those things.

– And corn, for example.

And then in betweenthere are things like tomatoes and cucumbers, and all of those things.

So, you know, thesetwo groups of plants have different life strategies.

In corn, if you selfpollinate corn all the time, we see really severeinbreeding depression.

The plants get shorter.

The yield gets to be less.

That doesn't happen in plants like peas.

The more you inbreedthem, you know, we don't see thatkind of change.

– And the easiest seeds to save, this is what we tell people, are peas, beans,lettuce, tomatoes, and peppers, so if you'renew to seed saving, those are the five varieties to start with first.

– For plants that are mostly self pollinating,you have to have a perfect flower,so you have to have the stigma and the anthers on the same flower, and very often whatyou'll find is that that flower has thosethings enclosed together, so peas very often will have the stigma and theanther closed together.

For other crops like corn, that are highlyencouraging crossing, you'll find temporalor spatial differences in flowers, so corn, youhave the male flower, which is the tassel, on the top, and you have the female flower, which is the silk, onthe bottom of the plant.

And that spatial separation helps encourage pollination from neighboring plants, so very oftenyou'll have the wind blow pollen from your neighbor onto the silk of theplant next to it.

– [Announcer] This easeof cross pollination is cause for muchconcern in regards to GMO corn cropsspreading their DNA among non-GMO varieties.

– In corn, it's ahuge possibility.

I mean, most conventional corn, it is genetically modified, so for growers whoare trying to grow organic corn seed,it's a huge challenge to ensure that theyare not getting that crosspollination happening.

– I feel like that's a lot of institutional knowledge that goes along with just with seedsaving in general, and so I kind ofwanted to extract that knowledge outof the community that we alreadyhave, have it housed in a place whereeverybody can access that.

– In seed vaults,they serve a purpose in that they'represerving the seed for long term, butwe want the seed out in the community,and in people's hands.

So that they'recomfortable with seed.

They're growing the seed, and they're saving seed, and they're bringing itback to the seed library, so somebody thatyou've never met can then check outseed that you donated and grow it in their garden, and then it justcontinues the cycle.

So, part of ourmission statement is to create aculture of sharing, and that's reallywhat we're trying to foster here.

– Yeah, and well thisbelongs to the community.

This is for the community.

That's why it belongsin the library.

– [Announcer] And heirloomseeds are a favorite among these communitycollections.

– A regular heirloom seedis just defined really as open pollinated.

It's just pollinated by nature, one way or another,and it's been like that for who knows how long? – [Announcer] Producerslike Prairiana and Lower Pineyalso steward seeds for their community.

It's really nice whensomebody does come up with some pepper seeds,or tomato seeds, and says, here, try these.

We like 'em.

And so we try 'em, and they're onesthat they've had for a long time.

– Well and everythinghas a story, and that's also anotherinteresting thing, like we have a formthat when people donate seeds, we askthem to fill out, and then at the very bottom, like, is there anythingthat you would like us to know about these seeds? Is there anythingyou would like us to include in terms of like an anecdote or a story? Because I feel likethat's just as important as the seeds themselves, 'cause that's partof our history.

– That's what's soneat about heirlooms is because people cometo the farmer's market, and go, this just tastes exactly like my grandmother'sgreen beans, you know, so that's very rewarding.

– There was one wherea gentleman was, he had saved seeds whilehe was in World War II, and he brought them back, and then his daughter had them, and then his granddaughter, and so that's somethingthat we've seen.

We've also hadpeople being like, I remember my grandmothergerminating these seeds in tea towels on the counter.

– You know, somepeople will have this old family bean, thatthey've grown for years, and they say, youknow, we live in town.

I don't have aplace to keep 'em.

– Some seeds that were donated, they were like we, you know, the woman who donated them said, they were saved by this family who had passed away,and so we decided to name the varietyafter the family.

– Another lady who isquite ill, fighting cancer, and she has this cornthat she wants preserved.

– People do stillhave 'em out there.

We just don't know it.

They don't know thatpeople want their seeds.

– Well and interestingly too, seeds and by defaultfood can be political, and so that's really interesting how those two thingsare, you know, you don't necessarilythink about what you're eatingand, you know, the scarcity or the abundance.

– That biodiversity is a cultural diversity thing.

– A friend of mine whogrew peppers from Aleppo and so those are very rare, and so you didn'tthink, it never really occurred to her thatto grow these peppers is political, and it'san act of kind of, it's a conscious actof saving these foods.

(electronic music) – People are really wonderful and giving us seedsto try to keep going.

– I think being more seed aware can only mean good forour local communities.

– Keep growing'em, and you know, keep adapting themto new environments.

Who knows how well a seed from a hundred yearsago would do today? The climate has changed.

Our managementpractices have changed.

We need varietiesthat are growing with our systems, and growing with our changing climate.

– [Announcer] This episode of Farm to ForkWyoming is available for 25 dollars.

Order online atwww.

Shop.

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To learn more and watch WyomingPBS programs online, visit us at www.

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This program wasproduced by Wyoming PBS, which is solely responsiblefor its content.

Source: Youtube

Every day we throw heaps of leftovers and scraps out which could actually be used to regrow fruits, vegetables, and herbs completely free of charge.

Not only can we save money, but also reduce our carbon footprint.

These fruits, vegetables, and herbs can all be purchased just once, and then regrown forever! Start out with a firm, healthy, organic sweet potato if it’s starting to sprout, all the better as that gives you a head start.

Place your sweet potato into a jar of water, immersing most of it in, but allowing a couple inches to be above water.

Be sure to change your water out occasionally to prevent molding.

Place your jar with the sweet potato into an area that gets sunlight, you’ll start seeing sprouts.

When the sprouts are four to five inches long, pull them off the sweet potato, which will grow more sprouts.

Place the sprouts in water – you can use the same jar.

When the sprout is well rooted, plant it in a hill of soil that’s about 10 inches high.

All you need is a piece of sprouting ginger to regrow more.

The root that you choose to plant should be plump with tight skin, and not shriveled and old.

It should also have a few eye buds on it.

Soak the ginger root in warm water overnight first.

Then, fill a pot with well-drained potting soil.

Place the ginger root with the eye bud pointing upwards in the soil and cover with 1 to 2 inches of soil; water well.

Place your ginger in a spot that doesn’t get too much bright sunlight, but does stay fairly warm.

Use a spray bottle to keep the soil moist.

Ginger doesn’t grow quickly, but in several weeks you’ll begin to see shoots popping out of the soil.

It’s ready for harvest about 3 to 4 months after growth begins.

You can grow your carrots in water by cutting the tops off of a carrot you bought at the grocery store.

You’ll need about an inch of the root.

Stick a toothpick into either side of the stump and then balance it on top of a glass.

Now, fill your glass with water, allow it to barely touch the bottom edge of the stump.

Place it in an area that gets sunlight, adding water when necessary so that it continues to touch the edge.

You’ll see green sprouts in the top of the carrot within a week, and small white roots will grow from the bottom in about the same amount of time.

If you want to grow green onions indefinitely, it’s ridiculously easy.

This is all you have to do: put a bunch of scallions with their roots into a glass filled with water and put the glass in a sunny spot like a window.

Cut off what you need to use for cooking, and your green onions will literally regrow almost overnight! This is an especially clever idea for re-growing celery from the base and it’s nearly as simple as re-growing onions all you do is chop celery stalks from the base of celery you’ve purchased from the supermarket and use it like you normally would.

Rinse it off and put it into a small bowl of warm water on a sunny windowsill.

Make sure that the base side is facing down, while the cut stalks face upright.

You’ll need to change out the water every couple of days, and use a spray bottle to water the base of the celery where the leaves are growing out.

After a week has passed, you can transfer your celery base to a planter and cover it up, except for the leaf tips, using a mixture of potting soil and dirt.

Water it generously and you’ll see growth really take off.

Re-growing leeks is similar to re-growing green onions, extremely easy.

Place a bunch of leeks with their roots downwards in a shallow glass container that’s filled with water.

Cut off what you need to use in your kitchen for now, and leave the rest in the glass.

Place the glass on a sunny windowsill, and occasionally change the water while the leeks begin to regrow themselves.

Along with celery and onions, bok choy can also be re-grown.

Like re-growing celery, all you have to do is chop us the bok choy you plan to cook with from the base, and then place it face up in a small bowl of warm water.

It may even begin to regenerate quicker than your celery, sometimes as fast as overnight.

In a couple of weeks, you can transfer it to a container of its own and continue growing it in soil.

Choose the largest bulbs you can find.

Separate the garlic head into individual cloves just before planting, and then fill up a container with well-drained soil that’s light and fluffy.

Make a hole using your finger that’s about twice the depth of the clove.

Press down very firmly as you fill up the hole with soil and water it well.

Keep it watered regularly until it flowers, or about a month before harvest which allows the bulbs to dry out.

It’s ready when about one-third to one-half of the leaves have turned brown and wilted.

Regrowing basil is so easy.

Look for a stem that has 6 or more leaves on it.

The longer the stem the better.

Use scissors to cut the stem from the rest of the bunch.

Cut the top leaves or the flowers off and the bottom leaves off right at the point of origin or where it meets the stem.

Place it in a jar of water, and then watch it grow.

You should see roots in about a week.

Lemongrass is fantastic in stir-fries, and it’s really easy to grow too.

All you do is take the stalks you purchase at the store and put them into a jar with about an inch of water.

That’s it.

Within two days the roots will sprout.

Just keep changing the water, and in three or four weeks, it should have two inches of roots so that it can be transplanted to soil.

Gently strip away all leaf sets on the stem, leaving on a couple of new leaves at the top of the cutting.

Place it in a shallow bowl of water, making sure the water covers both sets of leaf nodes that were previously stripped away.

Now, all you do is wait, making sure the water level is above the leaf nodes and switched out once a week.

Once the cutting roots, we can take anywhere from a few weeks to well over a month, let it remain in the water another 5 days to get stronger before planting it in soil.

Source: Youtube

Delicious! We have three eggplants or talong Hi Guys, It's S&H Sisters Forever.

I'm Sarah and I'm Hannah Hi Guys, It's S&H Sisters Forever.

I'm Sarah and I'm Hannah.

Today we'll be showing you to our garden! First, to start up we have some dianthus, wait you know what's my favorite flower is? Petunia! What? Petunia! Tell Sarah your favorite flower.

Oh no Here is the dianthus to start up.

Here pinkish reddish flowers and some of them are not in bloom yet.

And all the way down there.

We also have the roses, Some of Not all of them are blooming.

We have catnip over here with a lovely purple flower.

The stems going up and I really like the catnip.

Catnips are like lavender Do it attracts cats? Yes! This is our butterfly garden so we saw butterfly flying seconds ago.

Oh, there is a butterfly, Oh there's more! There it is! Can I touch it! Can I get it? My hat! Oh look here are our Peonies! My hat! Hello S&H Sisters Forever Viewers! We have some Weigelas.

Underneath them are the catnips what are those there mom.

Spirea! Spirea next to the Weigla next to the catnip.

Then we have some normal plants.

Daylily.

They are not ready yet.

NO! Remember the garden we did? Let's go look at it! Before anything else, remember our vegetable garden last year.

THANK YOU! We got almost 10K views! How about water? It feels dry, I'll go get the hose.

It's good.

Can I try one? It's not the best.

Not the best? Is it bitter? YESSS! Look at the radishes sticking out the ground.

yes? may I see? These are the radish the one with the little red knobs at the bottom.

It should be ready soon.

Here are some carrots.

I think these are this! These are the lettuce.

We can harvest them later.

The spinach is not growing well so we are going to plant more lettuce.

Here are our strawberries.

Some of them are not growing, still green like that.

I don't think there are flowers.

That's a lot, right? Our first year to have a harvest.

Oh, this one is almost ready! Huh? Oh yea you go get it.

You can eat it.

For sure there is another one somewhere.

My first strawberry.

Hmmm, how is it? sweet or sour? It's ready.

A mix of sweet and sour.

This is green peas.

What's in the middle? This is the Japanese cucumber This is a super super sweet hybrid cherry tomato.

The hybrid hot pepper.

Here are the long beans, they will be really long.

Here are the long beans are also known as sitaw.

What's that? Sitaw We also have Kamatis OR tomato in English.

It's tiny? may I see? May I see? Yea, it's tiny.

Ah okay Not ready, we need to plant it back.

Dig it, babe! Oh You want to try that Hannah or Sarah? I don't want to eat it.

Delicious! it looks like a clown nose.

alright, wash your hands babe.

Okay! Wash your hands.

You want to bite it? Mmmmmm Is it good? How is it? Can mommy try? Sarah you go bite babe and then mommy Mmmm it sounds good.

Oh my goodness! Tiny? Yea sure, No, YOu can wash that for daddy.

Okay.

When we eat our first one, it was really spicy maybe because it's not really ready or the red skin Zucchini! We have three eggplants or talong Mom spends a lot of time just to find her Okra.

I love okra.

We planted watermelon.

This I think.

Uhuh.

so the watermelon will be ready like about after 100 days.

Is it a hundred days? Maybe about ninety plus days Mom planted ampalaya.

Uhuh! here or bitter melon but it didn't survive.

stinky flowers.

Okay, we'll show you our potted vegetables.

Why are you covering your nose? yeahthose are beautiful but stinky viburnum here are the green bell sweetpeppers.

uhuh! Yummy! flat flat Italian parsley mix green pepper cilantro andparsley Do you notice we plant flowers next to vegetables so Oh bugs will not eat them.

This is a tomato.

Oh, wait there is one more thing.

What is it? The glorious thing of all.

What? The tree.

It's a pear tree.

Yea A pear tree that's bear fruit.

We can't wait to show you our harvest soon!!!.

Source: Youtube

All right, we are going to get up in here.

We are going to get up in this bed.

I shouldn't be walking in it, but that's okay because I have some plants to pull up.

This pepper plant, it's going to be in our way! Alright.

Alright let's see.

Hey guys its Feather Garden Belle Witchy Mommy! So I am here with my bulrash, my pitiful little bulrash plant.

We've got a few flowers on it.

and I'm just gonna grab a few pieces because we are just going to make a cup of tea, While we are doing our video.

So, it's almost time for me to pull it up for the season.

I have a bunch of babies thatare growing all over my yard and so that's nice.

Just gonna get a few ofthese.

The young leaves on barrage really good for teas, and salads.

and the flowers are just absolutely gorgeous floating around your cup.

This will be nice.

Nice to have a real cup! I will leave some flowers for the bees! I am going to try to get the leaves that look really good, the ones that aren't so brown.

Now we can go make our tea! So, this is what we have for our tea.

The leaves look nice and healthy they're really young.

They're small.

The big leaves are a little more uncomfortable to deal with because theyhave all these little burrs.

These probably taste delicious in tea.

Alright so let's get our tea brewing! I love this little mug.

This is actually Lily's mug, she picked it out It has an elephant on it, see the trunk.

and it says and so the adventure begins.

Tea is such a ritual.

The whole process of brewing your own cup of tea, there is more to it than just putting your herb in and pouring the water in and drinking it.

It's really a whole entire ritual in itself.

It looks delicious, I am going to let that steep, for about 10 to 15 minutes.

Source: Youtube

Posted by in seed saving Tags: , , , on Sep 12, 2019

HEY GUYS IT'S BRETT AT BROUSSARD HOMESTEAD TODAY WE'RE GOING TO BE SAVING OKRA SEED AND WE'LL SHOW YOU HOW WE DO THAT THIS IS THE POD THAT'S READY THIS IS WHAT IT LOOKED LIKE A MONTH AGO I LIKE THIS ONE AND I'M GOING TO BEND IT DOWN THAT TELLS US TO LEAVE IT ALONE SO WE CAN COLLECT HE SEED TODAY NOW THAT IT'S DRY WE'RE GOING TO TAKE IT IT RATTLES THAT'S HOW WE KNOW IT'S READY NOW WE'RE GOING TO TAKE IT INSIDE AND PROCESS IT HERE WE ARE BACK IN THE KITCHEN I ACTUALLY FOUND 2 PODS TO SAVE SEED FROM THIS ONE IS STILL A LITTLE GREEN.

IT MIGHT NOT BE READY BUT WE'LL SEE ALL OF THESE SPOTS OPEN UP ON THE SPINES WHEN ITS DRY IF YOU LEAVE IT ON THE PLANT TOO LONG IT WILL OPEN AND DROP THE SEEDS ON THE GROUND SO WE WANT TO CATCH IT BEFORE THAT WE CAREFULLY OPEN THIS UP AND SEE THE DARK GREEN DRY SEEDS FALL RIGHT OUT I MAKE SURE TO OPEN UP ALL THE SECTIONS AND GET ALL THE SEEDS OUT SOME LIKE TO HIDE JUST FROM THIS ONE POD WE'RE GETTING PROBABLY ABOUT 40-50 SEEDS THAT ONE'S DONE AND CAN GO INTO THE COMPOST THESE SEEDS LOOK GOOD AND DRY TOO SOME ARE KIND OF SHRIVELED LIKE THIS ONE WE'LL CULL THOSE OUT WE TAKE ALL THE SEEDS OUT THEN GO THROUGH AND SAVE THE BEST ONES THAT'S ALL THERE IS TO IT AFTER GOING THROUGH THE SEEDS I REALIZED MOST OF THE SEEDS FROM THE SECOND POD WITH THE GREEN ON IT WERE NOT DRY ENOUGH SO THIS IS WHAT I'M LEFT WITH WE WILL COLLECT FROM 2 – 4 DOZEN PODS IN A SEASON AND WE'LL GET A FEW THOUSAND SEEDS FOR THE NEXT YEAR'S PLANTING TO STORE THIS I TAKE A QUART ZIPLOCK I ADD A MOISTURE ABSORBER JUST IN CASE THERE'S ANY MOISTURE LEFT IN THOSE SEEDS THAT KEEPS THEM FRESH IN THE FREEZER THIS GOES IN THE FREEZER AND AS I GET MORE SEED I JUST ADD TO IT LAST YEAR WE TRIED STORING THEM ON THE SHELF AND THEY GERMINATED AND GREW BUT I DIDN'T FIND THEM AS VIGOROUS AS WHEN THEY HAVE GONE THROUGH A FREEZE AND THE FREEZER REPLICATES THAT SO I HOPE THIS VIDEO WAS HELPFUL AND WE'LL SEE YOU NEXT TIME.

Source: Youtube

Hi, I'm Gardener Scott.

Many of us grow carrots in our home gardens and almost all of us buy packets of seeds for those carrots.

With a little bit of patience, you can collect your own carrot seeds and forego having to ever buy a packet again.

Join me as I show you how to collect carrot seeds.

Believe it or not, collecting carrot seeds is not as easy as you might think.

They're not like a lot of the other plants you grow in your garden.

First, carrots are biennial plants.

That means they're going to flower in their second year of life.

So the first year you're growing carrots you might get big beautiful bushy plants, but no flowers.

And no flowers means no seeds.

So you have to grow carrots for two years to get these beautiful flowers to produce seeds.

For most gardeners in most gardens I would recommend go ahead and buy the package of carrot seeds, sow them, and have a crop that same year.

But if you find a variety that's special, you might want to take the extra time to collect the seeds yourself.

Now, these carrots are a variety called Cosmic Purple.

And I was given just a few seeds of the Cosmic Purple a year ago by a gardener friend of mine.

Now, I could have sown those seeds, grown the carrots, and harvested six or seven purple carrots and that would have been the end of it.

But I wanted a lot more than six or seven carrots.

So last year those carrots that I planted stayed in the ground over the winter.

And this spring they popped up with absolutely no problem.

And now in midsummer I have dozens and dozens of these carrot flowers and I will have thousands and thousands of carrot seeds to carry me into the future with a lot of Cosmic Purple carrots.

You may think there were a lot of carrots growing in this bed, but if you look, this is just one carrot right here.

And from this one purple carrot I count 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 stems coming off of just this one plant.

Over here is another one with a similar number of stems coming out of it.

And over here is another.

So there's just a few carrots planted right here, but there's probably close to 50 stems coming from just these few carrots.

Each of those stems will branch and split and eventually give you a flower at the tip.

On just this one stem alone I counted close to 25 flowers.

And on each of these flower heads I count between 50 and 60 of these smaller clusters of little white flowers.

And each of these clusters has somewhere between 30 and 40 individual white flowers.

That means if you do the math, we've got dozens upon dozens upon dozens of seeds.

As each of these little white flowers mature a little seed will develop.

This green head right here isn't immature.

It's actually the next stage.

The white flowers will turn into individual seeds.

Now, all we need to do is wait, let them dry, and they'll be ready to harvest.

So you can see you don't need a lot of carrots to collect a lot of seeds.

Just leave a couple extra carrots in the ground at the end of the season and the next year you'll have a lot of seeds.

Each carrot will give you about 15 stems and each of those stems will give you 25 umbels and each of those umbels.

probably between 30 and 50 flower clusters.

And each of those flower clusters has ten or 12 flowers and each of those flowers will turn into a seed.

That's a lot of seed by just saving a couple carrots at the end of the season.

After a few weeks, these flower clusters loaded with seeds will be dried and ready to harvest.

I just take what used to be the flowers, cut them off the stem, and then drop them into the paper bag.

Not all of the flower clusters will dry on the plant at the same rate so leave the ones that are still green and only take off the ones that have dried.

With all of these flower clusters ready it may take a little while, but you want to try to get as many of these as you can if you want a lot of seeds.

Now that I have a bag of dried carrot umbels I'm ready to begin the process of separating them into individual seeds.

I like to set up a work space with lots of room.

I'll lay down the newspapers and then collect the couple tools I'll need to make this process a little easier.

So let's begin by taking out one of the individual umbels.

Even when dried it still holds its basic shape and if you look closely you'll be able to see the individual seeds.

Each of the seeds resemble a little burr.

You can actually see the little sharp points that are sticking out from each of the Individual seeds.

And remember, each one of these at one point was one of those little white flowers.

By allowing the seeds to dry on the plant you can see how easy they are to brush off onto a plate.

Just by using my fingers I'm plucking off the tips and letting the seeds fall onto this plate.

This one umbel has given almost a plate full of seeds and there's still more to pluck out.

You want to try to be careful and leave as much of the big pieces of the umbel in place.

That just saves the cleanup later on.

As you do this you'll notice some of the seeds are bouncing onto the newspaper that's one reason why I set it up, just to help with the cleanup later on.

I don't know the exact count but there are hundreds of seeds here from just the one umbel and remember I've got dozens of umbels.

And so now I just repeat the process.

taking a dried umbel loaded with seeds and then just using my fingertips, brush them off onto the plate, trying to leave behind the dried structure.

And I'll just toss this into the compost pile later on.

This does take quite a while, but remember you're dealing with thousands of seeds, which will grow thousands of carrots.

So you'll be able to have ample carrots for many seasons to come.

It's worth spending a little bit of time now to benefit later on.

It won't take long before your plate begins to fill with all these seeds.

So, I like to move in stages.

This is the first stage.

collecting the seed.

Now, we'll move on to the next stage which is cleaning the seed.

These seeds are ready to use exactly as they are.

In fact, you could plant them as they are now and expect to get carrots.

But if you're going to store them for the long term and with thousands of seeds I'm planning on storing them, you want to remove that outer layer.

Remember I pointed out those little hairs, those little spikes? For long-term storage to be able to put a lot of seeds in a smaller space you should try to get rid of that outer shell.

The first way I do this is just to use the seeds themselves as basically little pieces of sandpaper against each other.

And I'll just rub the seeds against each other in my hands.

And this will separate most of those little hairs away from the seed.

This technique works really well to clean up the seeds, but all that chaff falls right back into the plate and at some point we're gonna have to separate the chaff from the seed.

So I prefer to use a second technique and this is where the sieve comes in.

So I'll take another plate and the sieve.

Now I'll drop the seeds into the sieve and I'll just work the seeds around the inside.

Now instead of the seeds rubbing up against each other as the only way to remove those outer hairs the roughness of this screen does the same and what happens is all the chaff falls through the screen onto this plate.

And now this chaff can be discarded and what's left behind is mostly seeds inside the sieve.

There's still some bits of stem that remain inside this sieve.

So at this point,I'll use my colander.

I'll place it over another plate and then just dump those seeds in.

The seeds will fall through and some of the larger pieces will remain behind.

There might be a couple very small stem pieces that fall through the colander at this point but they're very easy to pick out.

And what's left behind is cleaned carrot seeds ready for storage or planting.

If you don't have a sieve or a colander or choose not to use them, you can turn to a fan or go outside on a windy day.

After you've rubbed the seeds together and gotten all that outer layer to separate.

In windy conditions, or with the fan, just drop the seeds on to the plate and all those little bits of chaff will blow away.

It's a little bit messier, but just as effective.

Some of the heavier bits of stem will still fall onto the plate, just like the colander.

You just pick them out and you've got clean seed.

I still have a lot of work to do to collect the rest of the seeds from this bag, but really this process started a year ago.

So another hour or so really isn't that bad.

There you have it.

How to collect carrot seeds.

If you have any comments or questions, please let me know below.

If you haven't subscribed to the Gardener Scott channel you can do so now.

And if you like the video you can give me a thumbs up and share it.

I'm Gardener Scott.

Enjoy gardening.

Source: Youtube

>>> >>> HERBS >>> HERBS NEVER >>> HERBS NEVER TASTE >>> HERBS NEVER TASTE BETTER >>> HERBS NEVER TASTE BETTERTHAN >>> HERBS NEVER TASTE BETTERTHAN WHEN >>> HERBS NEVER TASTE BETTERTHAN WHEN THEY >>> HERBS NEVER TASTE BETTERTHAN WHEN THEY ARE >>> HERBS NEVER TASTE BETTERTHAN WHEN THEY ARE GROWN >>> HERBS NEVER TASTE BETTERTHAN WHEN THEY ARE GROWN IN THAN WHEN THEY ARE GROWN IN THAN WHEN THEY ARE GROWN INYOUR THAN WHEN THEY ARE GROWN INYOUR OWN THAN WHEN THEY ARE GROWN INYOUR OWN GARDEN.

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THINGS THAT YOU BROUGHT.

FIRST THINGS THAT YOU BROUGHT.

FIRST IDENTIFY THINGS THAT YOU BROUGHT.

FIRST IDENTIFY SOME THINGS THAT YOU BROUGHT.

FIRST IDENTIFY SOME OF THINGS THAT YOU BROUGHT.

FIRST IDENTIFY SOME OF THE FIRST IDENTIFY SOME OF THE FIRST IDENTIFY SOME OF THEPLANS.

PLANS.

PLANS.

>> PLANS.

>> I'LL PLANS.

>> I'LL SHOW PLANS.

>> I'LL SHOW YOU PLANS.

>> I'LL SHOW YOU MY PLANS.

>> I'LL SHOW YOU MY FAVORITES >> I'LL SHOW YOU MY FAVORITES >> I'LL SHOW YOU MY FAVORITESFIRST.

FIRST.

FIRST.

SO FIRST.

SO THIS FIRST.

SO THIS IS FIRST.

SO THIS IS FRENCH FIRST.

SO THIS IS FRENCH TERRACOTTA.

SO THIS IS FRENCH TERRACOTTA.

SO THIS IS FRENCH TERRACOTTA.

IT SO THIS IS FRENCH TERRACOTTA.

IT IS SO THIS IS FRENCH TERRACOTTA.

IT IS SO SO THIS IS FRENCH TERRACOTTA.

IT IS SO GOOD SO THIS IS FRENCH TERRACOTTA.

IT IS SO GOOD THAT SO THIS IS FRENCH TERRACOTTA.

IT IS SO GOOD THAT YOU SO THIS IS FRENCH TERRACOTTA.

IT IS SO GOOD THAT YOU CAN IT IS SO GOOD THAT YOU CAN IT IS SO GOOD THAT YOU CANHARDLY IT IS SO GOOD THAT YOU CANHARDLY EAT IT IS SO GOOD THAT YOU CANHARDLY EAT IT.

HARDLY EAT IT.

HARDLY EAT IT.

THE HARDLY EAT IT.

THE PROBLEM HARDLY EAT IT.

THE PROBLEM IS, HARDLY EAT IT.

THE PROBLEM IS, IT HARDLY EAT IT.

THE PROBLEM IS, IT DIES HARDLY EAT IT.

THE PROBLEM IS, IT DIES FOR HARDLY EAT IT.

THE PROBLEM IS, IT DIES FOR A THE PROBLEM IS, IT DIES FOR A THE PROBLEM IS, IT DIES FOR ALOT THE PROBLEM IS, IT DIES FOR ALOT OF THE PROBLEM IS, IT DIES FOR ALOT OF PEOPLE.

LOT OF PEOPLE.

LOT OF PEOPLE.

PEOPLE LOT OF PEOPLE.

PEOPLE TELL LOT OF PEOPLE.

PEOPLE TELL ME LOT OF PEOPLE.

PEOPLE TELL ME I'VE LOT OF PEOPLE.

PEOPLE TELL ME I'VE TRIED LOT OF PEOPLE.

PEOPLE TELL ME I'VE TRIED TO PEOPLE TELL ME I'VE TRIED TO PEOPLE TELL ME I'VE TRIED TOGROW PEOPLE TELL ME I'VE TRIED TOGROW IT.

GROW IT.

GROW IT.

THE GROW IT.

THE REASON GROW IT.

THE REASON IT GROW IT.

THE REASON IT NEEDS GROW IT.

THE REASON IT NEEDS REALLY GROW IT.

THE REASON IT NEEDS REALLY WELL THE REASON IT NEEDS REALLY WELL THE REASON IT NEEDS REALLY WELLDRAINED THE REASON IT NEEDS REALLY WELLDRAINED SOIL.

DRAINED SOIL.

DRAINED SOIL.

PUT DRAINED SOIL.

PUT IN DRAINED SOIL.

PUT IN A DRAINED SOIL.

PUT IN A POT DRAINED SOIL.

PUT IN A POT WITH DRAINED SOIL.

PUT IN A POT WITH GOOD DRAINED SOIL.

PUT IN A POT WITH GOOD POTTING PUT IN A POT WITH GOOD POTTING PUT IN A POT WITH GOOD POTTINGSOIL.

SOIL.

SOIL.

AND SOIL.

AND YOU SOIL.

AND YOU GOT SOIL.

AND YOU GOT A SOIL.

AND YOU GOT A GOOD SOIL.

AND YOU GOT A GOOD CHANCE.

AND YOU GOT A GOOD CHANCE.

AND YOU GOT A GOOD CHANCE.

>> AND YOU GOT A GOOD CHANCE.

>> YOU AND YOU GOT A GOOD CHANCE.

>> YOU CAN AND YOU GOT A GOOD CHANCE.

>> YOU CAN PUT AND YOU GOT A GOOD CHANCE.

>> YOU CAN PUT LOTS AND YOU GOT A GOOD CHANCE.

>> YOU CAN PUT LOTS OF >> YOU CAN PUT LOTS OF >> YOU CAN PUT LOTS OFDIFFERENT >> YOU CAN PUT LOTS OFDIFFERENT THINGS >> YOU CAN PUT LOTS OFDIFFERENT THINGS IN >> YOU CAN PUT LOTS OFDIFFERENT THINGS IN THERE? DIFFERENT THINGS IN THERE? DIFFERENT THINGS IN THERE?>> DIFFERENT THINGS IN THERE?>> YES.

>> YES.

>> YES.

THIS >> YES.

THIS IS >> YES.

THIS IS A >> YES.

THIS IS A HOT >> YES.

THIS IS A HOT PEPPER.

THIS IS A HOT PEPPER.

THIS IS A HOT PEPPER.

IT THIS IS A HOT PEPPER.

IT IS THIS IS A HOT PEPPER.

IT IS CALLED THIS IS A HOT PEPPER.

IT IS CALLED HOT THIS IS A HOT PEPPER.

IT IS CALLED HOT BANANA.

IT IS CALLED HOT BANANA.

IT IS CALLED HOT BANANA.

>> IT IS CALLED HOT BANANA.

>> IS IT IS CALLED HOT BANANA.

>> IS IT IT IS CALLED HOT BANANA.

>> IS IT SUPER IT IS CALLED HOT BANANA.

>> IS IT SUPER HOT? >> IS IT SUPER HOT? >> IS IT SUPER HOT?>> >> IS IT SUPER HOT?>> IF >> IS IT SUPER HOT?>> IF YOU >> IS IT SUPER HOT?>> IF YOU EAT >> IS IT SUPER HOT?>> IF YOU EAT IT >> IS IT SUPER HOT?>> IF YOU EAT IT AT >> IS IT SUPER HOT?>> IF YOU EAT IT AT THIS >> IS IT SUPER HOT?>> IF YOU EAT IT AT THIS STAGE >> IF YOU EAT IT AT THIS STAGE >> IF YOU EAT IT AT THIS STAGEWHEN >> IF YOU EAT IT AT THIS STAGEWHEN IT >> IF YOU EAT IT AT THIS STAGEWHEN IT JUST >> IF YOU EAT IT AT THIS STAGEWHEN IT JUST TURNS >> IF YOU EAT IT AT THIS STAGEWHEN IT JUST TURNS YELLOW, >> IF YOU EAT IT AT THIS STAGEWHEN IT JUST TURNS YELLOW, IT WHEN IT JUST TURNS YELLOW, IT WHEN IT JUST TURNS YELLOW, ITBURN WHEN IT JUST TURNS YELLOW, ITBURN THAT WHEN IT JUST TURNS YELLOW, ITBURN THAT HAIR WHEN IT JUST TURNS YELLOW, ITBURN THAT HAIR RIGHT WHEN IT JUST TURNS YELLOW, ITBURN THAT HAIR RIGHT OUT WHEN IT JUST TURNS YELLOW, ITBURN THAT HAIR RIGHT OUT OF BURN THAT HAIR RIGHT OUT OF BURN THAT HAIR RIGHT OUT OFYOUR BURN THAT HAIR RIGHT OUT OFYOUR EARS.

YOUR EARS.

YOUR EARS.

>> YOUR EARS.

>> I'VE YOUR EARS.

>> I'VE BEEN YOUR EARS.

>> I'VE BEEN LOOKING YOUR EARS.

>> I'VE BEEN LOOKING TO YOUR EARS.

>> I'VE BEEN LOOKING TO DO YOUR EARS.

>> I'VE BEEN LOOKING TO DO THAT >> I'VE BEEN LOOKING TO DO THAT >> I'VE BEEN LOOKING TO DO THATANYWAY.

ANYWAY.

ANYWAY.

WHAT ANYWAY.

WHAT ELSE? WHAT ELSE? WHAT ELSE?>> WHAT ELSE?>> LET'S WHAT ELSE?>> LET'S SEE WHAT ELSE?>> LET'S SEE THIS WHAT ELSE?>> LET'S SEE THIS IS WHAT ELSE?>> LET'S SEE THIS IS THE WHAT ELSE?>> LET'S SEE THIS IS THE BEST, >> LET'S SEE THIS IS THE BEST, >> LET'S SEE THIS IS THE BEST,THE >> LET'S SEE THIS IS THE BEST,THE BEST.

THE BEST.

THE BEST.

THIS THE BEST.

THIS IS THE BEST.

THIS IS LEMON.

THIS IS LEMON.

THIS IS LEMON.

SMELL THIS IS LEMON.

SMELL THAT.

SMELL THAT.

SMELL THAT.

MY SMELL THAT.

MY GOSH.

MY GOSH.

MY GOSH.

THIS MY GOSH.

THIS HERB MY GOSH.

THIS HERB IS MY GOSH.

THIS HERB IS A MY GOSH.

THIS HERB IS A LITTLE THIS HERB IS A LITTLE THIS HERB IS A LITTLEDIFFERENT.

DIFFERENT.

DIFFERENT.

YOU DIFFERENT.

YOU HAVE DIFFERENT.

YOU HAVE TO DIFFERENT.

YOU HAVE TO FERTILIZE DIFFERENT.

YOU HAVE TO FERTILIZE TO DIFFERENT.

YOU HAVE TO FERTILIZE TO EAT DIFFERENT.

YOU HAVE TO FERTILIZE TO EAT A YOU HAVE TO FERTILIZE TO EAT A YOU HAVE TO FERTILIZE TO EAT ALOT YOU HAVE TO FERTILIZE TO EAT ALOT OF YOU HAVE TO FERTILIZE TO EAT ALOT OF IT.

LOT OF IT.

LOT OF IT.

EVERY LOT OF IT.

EVERY FOUR LOT OF IT.

EVERY FOUR WEEKS LOT OF IT.

EVERY FOUR WEEKS I LOT OF IT.

EVERY FOUR WEEKS I GIVE LOT OF IT.

EVERY FOUR WEEKS I GIVE IT EVERY FOUR WEEKS I GIVE IT EVERY FOUR WEEKS I GIVE ITORGANIC EVERY FOUR WEEKS I GIVE ITORGANIC FERTILIZER.

ORGANIC FERTILIZER.

ORGANIC FERTILIZER.

THE ORGANIC FERTILIZER.

THE SMELL ORGANIC FERTILIZER.

THE SMELL IS ORGANIC FERTILIZER.

THE SMELL IS AMAZING.

THE SMELL IS AMAZING.

THE SMELL IS AMAZING.

>> THE SMELL IS AMAZING.

>> EVERYTHING THE SMELL IS AMAZING.

>> EVERYTHING HERE THE SMELL IS AMAZING.

>> EVERYTHING HERE IS THE SMELL IS AMAZING.

>> EVERYTHING HERE IS TOTALLY >> EVERYTHING HERE IS TOTALLY >> EVERYTHING HERE IS TOTALLYEDIBLE.

EDIBLE.

EDIBLE.

SO EDIBLE.

SO YOU EDIBLE.

SO YOU FEEL EDIBLE.

SO YOU FEEL SAFE.

SO YOU FEEL SAFE.

SO YOU FEEL SAFE.

>> SO YOU FEEL SAFE.

>> TELL SO YOU FEEL SAFE.

>> TELL ME SO YOU FEEL SAFE.

>> TELL ME ABOUT SO YOU FEEL SAFE.

>> TELL ME ABOUT THIS SO YOU FEEL SAFE.

>> TELL ME ABOUT THIS GUY.

>> TELL ME ABOUT THIS GUY.

>> TELL ME ABOUT THIS GUY.

>> >> TELL ME ABOUT THIS GUY.

>> THESE >> TELL ME ABOUT THIS GUY.

>> THESE ARE >> TELL ME ABOUT THIS GUY.

>> THESE ARE CHIVES.

>> THESE ARE CHIVES.

>> THESE ARE CHIVES.

THEY >> THESE ARE CHIVES.

THEY HAVE >> THESE ARE CHIVES.

THEY HAVE PRETTY >> THESE ARE CHIVES.

THEY HAVE PRETTY FLOWERS.

THEY HAVE PRETTY FLOWERS.

THEY HAVE PRETTY FLOWERS.

ISN'T THEY HAVE PRETTY FLOWERS.

ISN'T THAT THEY HAVE PRETTY FLOWERS.

ISN'T THAT GREAT THEY HAVE PRETTY FLOWERS.

ISN'T THAT GREAT T THEY HAVE PRETTY FLOWERS.

ISN'T THAT GREAT T IS THEY HAVE PRETTY FLOWERS.

ISN'T THAT GREAT T IS GREAT ISN'T THAT GREAT T IS GREAT ISN'T THAT GREAT T IS GREATBECAUSE ISN'T THAT GREAT T IS GREATBECAUSE IT ISN'T THAT GREAT T IS GREATBECAUSE IT HAS ISN'T THAT GREAT T IS GREATBECAUSE IT HAS A ISN'T THAT GREAT T IS GREATBECAUSE IT HAS A MILD ISN'T THAT GREAT T IS GREATBECAUSE IT HAS A MILD ONION BECAUSE IT HAS A MILD ONION BECAUSE IT HAS A MILD ONIONFLAVOR BECAUSE IT HAS A MILD ONIONFLAVOR THAT BECAUSE IT HAS A MILD ONIONFLAVOR THAT IS BECAUSE IT HAS A MILD ONIONFLAVOR THAT IS NOT BECAUSE IT HAS A MILD ONIONFLAVOR THAT IS NOT SO BECAUSE IT HAS A MILD ONIONFLAVOR THAT IS NOT SO STRONG.

FLAVOR THAT IS NOT SO STRONG.

FLAVOR THAT IS NOT SO STRONG.

THERE FLAVOR THAT IS NOT SO STRONG.

THERE IS FLAVOR THAT IS NOT SO STRONG.

THERE IS ONE FLAVOR THAT IS NOT SO STRONG.

THERE IS ONE THING.

THERE IS ONE THING.

THERE IS ONE THING.

THEY THERE IS ONE THING.

THEY SEE THERE IS ONE THING.

THEY SEE LIKE THERE IS ONE THING.

THEY SEE LIKE MAD THERE IS ONE THING.

THEY SEE LIKE MAD TOO.

THEY SEE LIKE MAD TOO.

THEY SEE LIKE MAD TOO.

I THEY SEE LIKE MAD TOO.

I HAVE THEY SEE LIKE MAD TOO.

I HAVE CHIVES THEY SEE LIKE MAD TOO.

I HAVE CHIVES GROWING THEY SEE LIKE MAD TOO.

I HAVE CHIVES GROWING ALL THEY SEE LIKE MAD TOO.

I HAVE CHIVES GROWING ALL OVER I HAVE CHIVES GROWING ALL OVER I HAVE CHIVES GROWING ALL OVERMY I HAVE CHIVES GROWING ALL OVERMY GARDEN.

MY GARDEN.

MY GARDEN.

>> MY GARDEN.

>> WHY MY GARDEN.

>> WHY DON'T MY GARDEN.

>> WHY DON'T WE MY GARDEN.

>> WHY DON'T WE GO MY GARDEN.

>> WHY DON'T WE GO TO MY GARDEN.

>> WHY DON'T WE GO TO YOUR >> WHY DON'T WE GO TO YOUR >> WHY DON'T WE GO TO YOURHOUSE? HOUSE? HOUSE?>> HOUSE?>> THIS HOUSE?>> THIS IS HOUSE?>> THIS IS BASIL.

>> THIS IS BASIL.

>> THIS IS BASIL.

>> >> THIS IS BASIL.

>> YOU >> THIS IS BASIL.

>> YOU HAVE >> THIS IS BASIL.

>> YOU HAVE CILANTRO.

>> YOU HAVE CILANTRO.

>> YOU HAVE CILANTRO.

PEOPLE >> YOU HAVE CILANTRO.

PEOPLE SAY >> YOU HAVE CILANTRO.

PEOPLE SAY I >> YOU HAVE CILANTRO.

PEOPLE SAY I CANNOT >> YOU HAVE CILANTRO.

PEOPLE SAY I CANNOT GROW PEOPLE SAY I CANNOT GROW PEOPLE SAY I CANNOT GROWCILANTRO.

CILANTRO.

CILANTRO.

IT CILANTRO.

IT GOES CILANTRO.

IT GOES TO CILANTRO.

IT GOES TO SEED CILANTRO.

IT GOES TO SEED RIGHT CILANTRO.

IT GOES TO SEED RIGHT AWAY.

IT GOES TO SEED RIGHT AWAY.

IT GOES TO SEED RIGHT AWAY.

SO IT GOES TO SEED RIGHT AWAY.

SO YOU IT GOES TO SEED RIGHT AWAY.

SO YOU CAN IT GOES TO SEED RIGHT AWAY.

SO YOU CAN CRUSH IT GOES TO SEED RIGHT AWAY.

SO YOU CAN CRUSH THE IT GOES TO SEED RIGHT AWAY.

SO YOU CAN CRUSH THE SEEDS IT GOES TO SEED RIGHT AWAY.

SO YOU CAN CRUSH THE SEEDS AND SO YOU CAN CRUSH THE SEEDS AND SO YOU CAN CRUSH THE SEEDS ANDUSE SO YOU CAN CRUSH THE SEEDS ANDUSE THEM SO YOU CAN CRUSH THE SEEDS ANDUSE THEM IN SO YOU CAN CRUSH THE SEEDS ANDUSE THEM IN STEWS SO YOU CAN CRUSH THE SEEDS ANDUSE THEM IN STEWS AND SO YOU CAN CRUSH THE SEEDS ANDUSE THEM IN STEWS AND SOUPS.

USE THEM IN STEWS AND SOUPS.

USE THEM IN STEWS AND SOUPS.

BUT USE THEM IN STEWS AND SOUPS.

BUT THAT USE THEM IN STEWS AND SOUPS.

BUT THAT IS USE THEM IN STEWS AND SOUPS.

BUT THAT IS SO USE THEM IN STEWS AND SOUPS.

BUT THAT IS SO GOOD USE THEM IN STEWS AND SOUPS.

BUT THAT IS SO GOOD IN USE THEM IN STEWS AND SOUPS.

BUT THAT IS SO GOOD IN SALADS BUT THAT IS SO GOOD IN SALADS BUT THAT IS SO GOOD IN SALADSAND BUT THAT IS SO GOOD IN SALADSAND MEXICAN.

AND MEXICAN.

AND MEXICAN.

THIS AND MEXICAN.

THIS WILL AND MEXICAN.

THIS WILL GROW AND MEXICAN.

THIS WILL GROW RIGHT AND MEXICAN.

THIS WILL GROW RIGHT BACK.

THIS WILL GROW RIGHT BACK.

THIS WILL GROW RIGHT BACK.

AND THIS WILL GROW RIGHT BACK.

AND NOW THIS WILL GROW RIGHT BACK.

AND NOW LOOK THIS WILL GROW RIGHT BACK.

AND NOW LOOK AT THIS WILL GROW RIGHT BACK.

AND NOW LOOK AT THAT THIS WILL GROW RIGHT BACK.

AND NOW LOOK AT THAT SMELL AND NOW LOOK AT THAT SMELL AND NOW LOOK AT THAT SMELLTHAT.

THAT.

THAT.

SOME THAT.

SOME PEOPLE THAT.

SOME PEOPLE SATE THAT.

SOME PEOPLE SATE IT.

SOME PEOPLE SATE IT.

SOME PEOPLE SATE IT.

IT SOME PEOPLE SATE IT.

IT MIGHT SOME PEOPLE SATE IT.

IT MIGHT BE SOME PEOPLE SATE IT.

IT MIGHT BE A SOME PEOPLE SATE IT.

IT MIGHT BE A GENETIC SOME PEOPLE SATE IT.

IT MIGHT BE A GENETIC THING IT MIGHT BE A GENETIC THING IT MIGHT BE A GENETIC THINGTHEY IT MIGHT BE A GENETIC THINGTHEY SAY IT MIGHT BE A GENETIC THINGTHEY SAY IT IT MIGHT BE A GENETIC THINGTHEY SAY IT MAY IT MIGHT BE A GENETIC THINGTHEY SAY IT MAY BE IT MIGHT BE A GENETIC THINGTHEY SAY IT MAY BE A IT MIGHT BE A GENETIC THINGTHEY SAY IT MAY BE A GENETIC THEY SAY IT MAY BE A GENETIC THEY SAY IT MAY BE A GENETICTHING THEY SAY IT MAY BE A GENETICTHING FOR THEY SAY IT MAY BE A GENETICTHING FOR SOME THEY SAY IT MAY BE A GENETICTHING FOR SOME THEM THEY SAY IT MAY BE A GENETICTHING FOR SOME THEM THAT THEY SAY IT MAY BE A GENETICTHING FOR SOME THEM THAT DON'T THING FOR SOME THEM THAT DON'T THING FOR SOME THEM THAT DON'TLIKE THING FOR SOME THEM THAT DON'TLIKE CILANTRO.

LIKE CILANTRO.

LIKE CILANTRO.

>> LIKE CILANTRO.

>> IS LIKE CILANTRO.

>> IS THIS LIKE CILANTRO.

>> IS THIS AFRICAN LIKE CILANTRO.

>> IS THIS AFRICAN BLUE LIKE CILANTRO.

>> IS THIS AFRICAN BLUE BASIL.

>> IS THIS AFRICAN BLUE BASIL.

>> IS THIS AFRICAN BLUE BASIL.

I >> IS THIS AFRICAN BLUE BASIL.

I HAVE >> IS THIS AFRICAN BLUE BASIL.

I HAVE AND >> IS THIS AFRICAN BLUE BASIL.

I HAVE AND I >> IS THIS AFRICAN BLUE BASIL.

I HAVE AND I WILLAN >> IS THIS AFRICAN BLUE BASIL.

I HAVE AND I WILLAN FRIEND >> IS THIS AFRICAN BLUE BASIL.

I HAVE AND I WILLAN FRIEND THAT I HAVE AND I WILLAN FRIEND THAT I HAVE AND I WILLAN FRIEND THATPUTS I HAVE AND I WILLAN FRIEND THATPUTS IN I HAVE AND I WILLAN FRIEND THATPUTS IN PESTO.

PUTS IN PESTO.

PUTS IN PESTO.

BUT PUTS IN PESTO.

BUT I PUTS IN PESTO.

BUT I THINK PUTS IN PESTO.

BUT I THINK IT PUTS IN PESTO.

BUT I THINK IT MAY PUTS IN PESTO.

BUT I THINK IT MAY MAKE PUTS IN PESTO.

BUT I THINK IT MAY MAKE YOUR BUT I THINK IT MAY MAKE YOUR BUT I THINK IT MAY MAKE YOURHAIR.

HAIR.

HAIR.

>> HAIR.

>> TELL HAIR.

>> TELL ME HAIR.

>> TELL ME WHERE HAIR.

>> TELL ME WHERE I HAIR.

>> TELL ME WHERE I PUT HAIR.

>> TELL ME WHERE I PUT THIS.

>> TELL ME WHERE I PUT THIS.

>> TELL ME WHERE I PUT THIS.

YOU >> TELL ME WHERE I PUT THIS.

YOU SEE >> TELL ME WHERE I PUT THIS.

YOU SEE THE >> TELL ME WHERE I PUT THIS.

YOU SEE THE SOIL >> TELL ME WHERE I PUT THIS.

YOU SEE THE SOIL AND >> TELL ME WHERE I PUT THIS.

YOU SEE THE SOIL AND THE YOU SEE THE SOIL AND THE YOU SEE THE SOIL AND THEDRAINAGE.

DRAINAGE.

DRAINAGE.

SO DRAINAGE.

SO WHERE DRAINAGE.

SO WHERE DO DRAINAGE.

SO WHERE DO WE DRAINAGE.

SO WHERE DO WE PUT DRAINAGE.

SO WHERE DO WE PUT THIS? SO WHERE DO WE PUT THIS? SO WHERE DO WE PUT THIS?SUN? SUN? SUN?NO SUN?NO SUN? NO SUN? NO SUN?>> NO SUN?>> EVERYTHING NO SUN?>> EVERYTHING HERE NO SUN?>> EVERYTHING HERE NEEDS NO SUN?>> EVERYTHING HERE NEEDS FULL >> EVERYTHING HERE NEEDS FULL >> EVERYTHING HERE NEEDS FULLSUN.

SUN.

SUN.

THIS SUN.

THIS IS SUN.

THIS IS VIETNAMESE SUN.

THIS IS VIETNAMESE CILANTRO.

THIS IS VIETNAMESE CILANTRO.

THIS IS VIETNAMESE CILANTRO.

IT THIS IS VIETNAMESE CILANTRO.

IT IS THIS IS VIETNAMESE CILANTRO.

IT IS REALLY THIS IS VIETNAMESE CILANTRO.

IT IS REALLY GOOD.

IT IS REALLY GOOD.

IT IS REALLY GOOD.

IT IT IS REALLY GOOD.

IT CAN IT IS REALLY GOOD.

IT CAN NEVER IT IS REALLY GOOD.

IT CAN NEVER DRY IT IS REALLY GOOD.

IT CAN NEVER DRY OUT.

IT CAN NEVER DRY OUT.

IT CAN NEVER DRY OUT.

THYME, IT CAN NEVER DRY OUT.

THYME, SAVORY.

THYME, SAVORY.

THYME, SAVORY.

WINTER THYME, SAVORY.

WINTER SAVORY, THYME, SAVORY.

WINTER SAVORY, YUCK.

WINTER SAVORY, YUCK.

WINTER SAVORY, YUCK.

>> WINTER SAVORY, YUCK.

>> SHOULD WINTER SAVORY, YUCK.

>> SHOULD WE WINTER SAVORY, YUCK.

>> SHOULD WE BUY WINTER SAVORY, YUCK.

>> SHOULD WE BUY SEEDS WINTER SAVORY, YUCK.

>> SHOULD WE BUY SEEDS OR >> SHOULD WE BUY SEEDS OR >> SHOULD WE BUY SEEDS ORLITTLE >> SHOULD WE BUY SEEDS ORLITTLE PLANTS? LITTLE PLANTS? LITTLE PLANTS?>> LITTLE PLANTS?>> I LITTLE PLANTS?>> I THINK LITTLE PLANTS?>> I THINK IT LITTLE PLANTS?>> I THINK IT IS LITTLE PLANTS?>> I THINK IT IS EASIEST LITTLE PLANTS?>> I THINK IT IS EASIEST TO LITTLE PLANTS?>> I THINK IT IS EASIEST TO BUY >> I THINK IT IS EASIEST TO BUY >> I THINK IT IS EASIEST TO BUYLITTLE >> I THINK IT IS EASIEST TO BUYLITTLE PLANTS.

LITTLE PLANTS.

LITTLE PLANTS.

>> LITTLE PLANTS.

>> YOU LITTLE PLANTS.

>> YOU NOTICE LITTLE PLANTS.

>> YOU NOTICE SOMETHING.

>> YOU NOTICE SOMETHING.

>> YOU NOTICE SOMETHING.

I >> YOU NOTICE SOMETHING.

I USED >> YOU NOTICE SOMETHING.

I USED THE >> YOU NOTICE SOMETHING.

I USED THE PLASTIC >> YOU NOTICE SOMETHING.

I USED THE PLASTIC POTS >> YOU NOTICE SOMETHING.

I USED THE PLASTIC POTS HERE.

I USED THE PLASTIC POTS HERE.

I USED THE PLASTIC POTS HERE.

THEY I USED THE PLASTIC POTS HERE.

THEY LOVE I USED THE PLASTIC POTS HERE.

THEY LOVE THIS I USED THE PLASTIC POTS HERE.

THEY LOVE THIS POX I USED THE PLASTIC POTS HERE.

THEY LOVE THIS POX I I USED THE PLASTIC POTS HERE.

THEY LOVE THIS POX I USE I USED THE PLASTIC POTS HERE.

THEY LOVE THIS POX I USE POT.

THEY LOVE THIS POX I USE POT.

THEY LOVE THIS POX I USE POT.

BUT THEY LOVE THIS POX I USE POT.

BUT I THEY LOVE THIS POX I USE POT.

BUT I USE THEY LOVE THIS POX I USE POT.

BUT I USE PLASTIC THEY LOVE THIS POX I USE POT.

BUT I USE PLASTIC WHEN THEY LOVE THIS POX I USE POT.

BUT I USE PLASTIC WHEN I THEY LOVE THIS POX I USE POT.

BUT I USE PLASTIC WHEN I GROW BUT I USE PLASTIC WHEN I GROW BUT I USE PLASTIC WHEN I GROWFOOD BUT I USE PLASTIC WHEN I GROWFOOD BECAUSE BUT I USE PLASTIC WHEN I GROWFOOD BECAUSE YOU BUT I USE PLASTIC WHEN I GROWFOOD BECAUSE YOU NEVER BUT I USE PLASTIC WHEN I GROWFOOD BECAUSE YOU NEVER WHERE FOOD BECAUSE YOU NEVER WHERE FOOD BECAUSE YOU NEVER WHERETHEY FOOD BECAUSE YOU NEVER WHERETHEY GET FOOD BECAUSE YOU NEVER WHERETHEY GET THE FOOD BECAUSE YOU NEVER WHERETHEY GET THE CLAY FOOD BECAUSE YOU NEVER WHERETHEY GET THE CLAY TO FOOD BECAUSE YOU NEVER WHERETHEY GET THE CLAY TO MAKE FOOD BECAUSE YOU NEVER WHERETHEY GET THE CLAY TO MAKE A THEY GET THE CLAY TO MAKE A THEY GET THE CLAY TO MAKE ACLAY THEY GET THE CLAY TO MAKE ACLAY POT.

CLAY POT.

CLAY POT.

I'M CLAY POT.

I'M NOT CLAY POT.

I'M NOT THE CLAY POT.

I'M NOT THE BIGGEST CLAY POT.

I'M NOT THE BIGGEST PLASTIC CLAY POT.

I'M NOT THE BIGGEST PLASTIC FAN I'M NOT THE BIGGEST PLASTIC FAN I'M NOT THE BIGGEST PLASTIC FANIN I'M NOT THE BIGGEST PLASTIC FANIN THE I'M NOT THE BIGGEST PLASTIC FANIN THE WORLD.

IN THE WORLD.

IN THE WORLD.

BUT IN THE WORLD.

BUT IT IN THE WORLD.

BUT IT IS IN THE WORLD.

BUT IT IS GREAT IN THE WORLD.

BUT IT IS GREAT FOR IN THE WORLD.

BUT IT IS GREAT FOR SOMETHING BUT IT IS GREAT FOR SOMETHING BUT IT IS GREAT FOR SOMETHINGLIKE BUT IT IS GREAT FOR SOMETHINGLIKE THIS.

LIKE THIS.

LIKE THIS.

THESE LIKE THIS.

THESE ARE LIKE THIS.

THESE ARE COOL LIKE THIS.

THESE ARE COOL ONES.

THESE ARE COOL ONES.

THESE ARE COOL ONES.

>> THESE ARE COOL ONES.

>> THAT THESE ARE COOL ONES.

>> THAT DOES THESE ARE COOL ONES.

>> THAT DOES NOT THESE ARE COOL ONES.

>> THAT DOES NOT LOOK THESE ARE COOL ONES.

>> THAT DOES NOT LOOK LIKE >> THAT DOES NOT LOOK LIKE >> THAT DOES NOT LOOK LIKEPLASTIC.

PLASTIC.

PLASTIC.

AND PLASTIC.

AND YOU'LL PLASTIC.

AND YOU'LL HAVE PLASTIC.

AND YOU'LL HAVE IT PLASTIC.

AND YOU'LL HAVE IT FOREVER.

AND YOU'LL HAVE IT FOREVER.

AND YOU'LL HAVE IT FOREVER.

>> AND YOU'LL HAVE IT FOREVER.

>> IT AND YOU'LL HAVE IT FOREVER.

>> IT WAS AND YOU'LL HAVE IT FOREVER.

>> IT WAS 80 AND YOU'LL HAVE IT FOREVER.

>> IT WAS 80 BUCKS, AND YOU'LL HAVE IT FOREVER.

>> IT WAS 80 BUCKS, BUT AND YOU'LL HAVE IT FOREVER.

>> IT WAS 80 BUCKS, BUT STILL.

>> IT WAS 80 BUCKS, BUT STILL.

>> IT WAS 80 BUCKS, BUT STILL.

>> >> IT WAS 80 BUCKS, BUT STILL.

>> I >> IT WAS 80 BUCKS, BUT STILL.

>> I HAD >> IT WAS 80 BUCKS, BUT STILL.

>> I HAD TO >> IT WAS 80 BUCKS, BUT STILL.

>> I HAD TO PUNCH >> IT WAS 80 BUCKS, BUT STILL.

>> I HAD TO PUNCH THE >> IT WAS 80 BUCKS, BUT STILL.

>> I HAD TO PUNCH THE HOLES >> IT WAS 80 BUCKS, BUT STILL.

>> I HAD TO PUNCH THE HOLES IN >> I HAD TO PUNCH THE HOLES IN >> I HAD TO PUNCH THE HOLES INIT.

IT.

IT.

IT IT.

IT COMES IT.

IT COMES RIGHT IT.

IT COMES RIGHT THROUGH.

IT COMES RIGHT THROUGH.

IT COMES RIGHT THROUGH.

SO IT COMES RIGHT THROUGH.

SO EVERYTHING IT COMES RIGHT THROUGH.

SO EVERYTHING IN IT COMES RIGHT THROUGH.

SO EVERYTHING IN HERE IT COMES RIGHT THROUGH.

SO EVERYTHING IN HERE NEEDS SO EVERYTHING IN HERE NEEDS SO EVERYTHING IN HERE NEEDSSUN.

SUN.

SUN.

THIS SUN.

THIS IS SUN.

THIS IS JUST SUN.

THIS IS JUST LEMON SUN.

THIS IS JUST LEMON THYME.

THIS IS JUST LEMON THYME.

THIS IS JUST LEMON THYME.

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Source: Youtube

[Music] The plant of the moment here at Hampton Court Palace have got to be the herbs here in the kitchen garden.

This time of year as late spring turns into early summer the growth is lush and fresh and perfect for harvesting.

And we really do have an amazing range of herbs here to touch and see and smell and discover.

In broader terms herbs are basically just really useful plants that have been used for hundreds of years in foods.

They can be used to make tea.

They can be added to salads or stews for their texture and flavour.

They can be used for the healing properties or even just for their wonderful scent.

This is Sorrel or Rumex acetosa, which is different to Wood Sorrel which is a type of Oxalis.

These perennial herbs are grown for their tangy slightly sour flavour which is just perfect for adding a real kick to sauces salads or for egg dishes or even to make a classic sorrel soup.

John Evelyn writing 1699 suggested as a replacement for citrus in cooking.

It's even been used as a sweet mixed with brown sugar and used instead of apples in baking.

From even earlier in the sixteen hundreds.

Nicholas Culpeppers book The Complete Herbal suggests sorrel as a treatment for the plague.

It also says the sick can be held powerful to resist the poison of the scorpion Sorrel is easy to start from seed or you can save a bit of time and by a ready grown plant and that way you can start to harvest the leaves immediately.

We grow a few different types here in the kitchen garden such as this common sorrow which has these long leathery leaves can grow up to one metre high.

We also have a French or Buckler leafed sorrel which has a nice citrus tang and also the red veined sorrel which has a beautiful red stripe running through the centre of its leaves.

Tansy or Tanacetum vulgare is sometimes also known as buttons because of its perfectly round yellow flowers.

It's a member of the chrysanthemum family and it has these pinnate deeply divided aromatic leaves that when crushed have this scent which is like camphor with a hint of rosemary.

It's all for a herb too with these upright stems which finger up to 75 centimetres high and it produces these clusters of bright yellow perfectly round flowers.

The leaves and flowers would be toxic if consumed in large quantities.

During Tudor times the wormwood along with Tansy, Dais, Rue and Lavender have been strewn across the floors in order to mask any unpleasant smells and keep away insects.

Some of this plant's historical uses in England include being placed on window sills to repel flies being used as an ant repellent sprigs of it being placed in bed linen to repel any unwanted pests or even as a yellowish green dye for wool.

Salad Burnet or Sanguisorba minor is a herbacious perennial plant that has these distinctive pairs of toothed leaflets that form a rosette shape in the young plants.

It has these unusual clusters of crimson flowers which bloom from Midsummer through to Autumn which are then replaced by small bird fruit.

The leaves when crushed give out a slight cucumber scent and they were traditionally used in salads and as a flavouring.

Typically it can be found on dry grassy meadows often on limestone soils it's drought tolerant and grows all year round.

So it's a good tough plant for an exposed and sunny site in the garden.

It's been grown in Britain since the 16th century when it was planted along the borders of paths so that its scent would rise up when it was old enough.

It can be used instead of mint leaves in some recipes or for a stronger flavour mixed with other herbs especially Rosemary and Tarragon.

As with other herbs which are used in salads always try to pick the youngest freshest leaves as they are less bitter and have the best flavour.

It's really important to keep cutting this plant in order to encourage new growth.

So this unusual herb is called Horehound or Marrubium vulgare.

It's been used in the past in cough remedies for throat sweets.

Historically it's also been used in brewing.

King Henry VIII was reputed to have been very fond of a spiced ale which probably included horehound.

From the tangy tasty salad leaves of Salad Burnet and Sorrel.

To the toxic insect repelling Tansy.

These are just a few of the really cool herbs to discover at Hampton Court Palace right now.

Source: Youtube

 

19 Perfect Tips How To Growing Tomatoes in Pots.

  • Use Biodegradable Pots Peat pots make planting extra easy: Just dig the hole, put in the plant, and fill in with soil.
  • There’s no need to take your plants out of the pot.
  • Feed Them Well Like growing kids, tomatoes are heavy feeders, so add plenty of organic matter (such as compost) to the soil.
  • Give them an early boost by working a little fertilizer into the soil at planting time.
  • Plant Deeply Tomato plants form roots all the way along their stems, so you can give your plants an extra-strong root system (especially the tall, leggy ones) by planting them on their sides.
  • Do remove any leaves that would be covered under the soil, though.
  • Buried leaves could rot and encourage disease.
  • Water Well It’s always a good idea to give freshly added plants a little extra water the first week or two after you plant them to help them get established.They’re most susceptible to drying out when they’re young.
  • Stake Them There are two basic categories of tomatoes: determinate and indeterminate.
    • Determinate tomatoes, sometimes called bush tomatoes, put on most of their growth before they start to bloom and produce fruit.
    • Indeterminate tomatoes keep growing after they start to bloom — so the plants can become quite large (more than 6 feet tall).
  • Stake indeterminate tomatoes to keep them standing.It will help keep the plants healthy and make the fruits easier to harvest.
  • Plant in Pots Try planting your tomatoes in containers if you’ve had trouble growing them in the past.
  • Large containers filled with a high-quality potting mix give your plants more protection from fungal diseases.
  • Try Red Mulch We know mulch is good for the garden — but university research suggests that red plastic mulch may make your tomato plants more productive.(One study showed yields increased by 20 percent by using red mulch.) Red mulch also helps the soil conserve moisture longer during hot, dry periods and inhibits weeds.
  • Keep Out Cutworms Hungry cutworms attack young vegetables.
  • Protect your tomatoes by giving them a collar of newspaper.Or cut the top and bottom off a tin can and sink that into the soil around your plants.It creates a barrier that forces the cutworms to go looking for another dinner.
  • Protect Them from Cold You can use a variety of devices to protect your tomatoes from the cold if you want to get a jump-start on the tomato-growing season.
  • One of the easiest is a simple cloche made from an old milk jug; simply cut the bottom of the jug and set it over your tomato plants.Leave the top open so the cloche doesn’t get too hot inside during sunny days.
  • Keep the Foliage Dry Tomatoes are susceptible to a number of diseases.
  • To keep your plants healthy, water with a soaker hose.This helps the foliage stay drier; wet foliage (especially in late afternoon, evening, and nighttime hours) can encourage common fungal diseases such as blight.
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